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Posts by KazKam

I wasn't saying Kinect isn't a viable product or relatively good at it's form of human-computer interaction. My point was that it isn't as visionary as he billed it. Kinect probably would not have even been on Microsoft's radar had the Wii HCI revolution not happened, ergo, it is Microsoft's very late to the game answer to what Nintendo somewhat "forced" them to do to stay relevant/competitive.
^ This. I don't know why these CEOs and directors keep making these kinds of statements that are obviously thinly veiled attempts to hide their own company's ineptitude, lack of vision, and inability to play catch-up. Do they really think anyone is going to believe these statements are anything else? Hell, even the Kinect, which he bills as some visionary MS product, is actually a four-year-old-late-to-the-game attempt to compete with Wii/Wiimote interaction. Pathetic, dude.
Careful, this is a double-edged sword. One could also argue that labor unions and some of the aforementioned laws are the very same reason the work ethic in the US is abysmal, and the entitlement mentality has driven up wages and compensation so high we are becoming unable to compete in a global market. And that's exactly why American manufacturing businesses DO love China.Also, regardless of how they came about, aren't many of the laws you mentioned mandated at the state...
Again, I am not opposed to issuing smartphone-like devices as standard issue, as long as they are for active-duty responsibilities only. In fact, I firmly believe in the US maintaining the best armed and most capable military in the world.My issue comes in the form of the line blurred between a device issued for WORK, as opposed to a NON-ESSENTIAL item for personal use like a smartphone. This is where my "entitlement" quip comes in.A roof over ones head and food on the...
I don't deny a *locked-down* iPhone or other smartphone has the potential of GREAT practical benefit as a military tool. My initial post is in response to the first two paragraphs of the article: "The U.S. Army is interested in giving each of its soldiers a smartphone, and may give them a choice between Apple's iPhone or one running Google Android. As reported this week by ArmyTimes, the Army is considering making a smartphone a standard piece of equipment in a soldier's...
If you read my initial post, I am not opposed to issuing the military new tech, and I'd love to see Apple get a military contract, as long as those new devices are locked down to military functionality. To bring up Gunslinger's rifle metaphor, US soldiers ARE issued usually some AR-15 variant, but they aren't allowed to shoot at mailboxes when they're off duty.What I am opposed to is issuing completely open iOS or Android devices with paid commercial call/data plans that...
Playing the sympathy card (and possibly falsely), the last act of a desperate man.How about presenting a clear and logical argument for purchasing smartphones and cell plans for all soldiers instead of attempting to appeal to emotions which have no bearing on the topic at hand?
That's probably because you didn't read it. You are out of your league, and grasping at straws.
Exactly.Last I checked, the draft wasn't in effect. Joining the military and defending the US are still voluntary and willful acts, and nowhere in the contract they knowingly sign does it say "thou shalt have the technological ability to converse with your baby-mama and play farmville at all times".Also, it's "You're" not "Your", and "we" not "be", and "?" not ".".
Am I the only one who thinks this is a terrible idea? (Don't answer, rhetorical question.) I do NOT want my taxpayer dollars going to giving every kid in uniform a government subsidized tool for playing Angry Birds and checking his facebook account while he's supposed to be manning his post. Not that there isn't a place for some of this technology in the battlefield, or in daily ops, there is; but only on dedicated locked-down hardware (that could be a iPhone with a...
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