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Posts by Michael Scrip

True... part of your monthly bill is the subsidy. But it's not that much of it.A 16GB iPhone, for instance, is $650... and you must pay $200 up front. The remaining $450 is spread out over 24 months... which works out to about $20 a month.The biggest part of your phone bill is the service itself. You're right... that's where the carriers make their money.I think the average monthly cell phone bill in the US is around $80 a month... so the carriers could be making around...
Good post.And don't forget... not every iPhone that is sold goes home to an existing iPhone owner who is upgrading.Apple sold an average of 500,000 iPhones every day last quarter. I suspect a hefty amount of them were sold to new iPhone owners.
Maybe this new "no contract" plan will help T-Mobile.Prior to that... T-Mobile has always offered competitive prices compared to "expensive" carriers like Verizon and AT&T... yet their subscribership is small. T-Mobile has been the 4th place carrier (out of 4) in the US for quite a while.It's not just basic arithmetic that kept people away from T-Mobile... it was coverage and phone selection.I guess it depends on where you live... but I know very few people who have...
That's what I was thinking. Sprint and T-Mobile have always been "value" carriers compared to Verizon and AT&T.Yet Verizon and AT&T have 2 to 3 times as many subscribers. I wonder why...Maybe you do get what you pay for I think it's great that T-Mobile is trying something new in the US. The no contract thing is nice... but you now have to buy your phone outright. And your monthly service will be cheaper on T-Mobile... but you may have poorer coverage.
You're basically getting an interest-free loan on a $650 phone spread out over two years... versus paying the $650 in one lump sum up front. That's a big deal to some people.If you're gonna stay with the carrier anyway... why not let them finance the phone?Plus... how often would people change carriers if they could? Every 6 months? That would be a hassle... porting your number and such.In the United States the carriers all use different frequencies and equipment... so...
If you think about it... that's exactly what they do. There are always 3 iPhones on the market at any one time... good, better, best.Right now it's the iPhone 4, iPhone 4S and iPhone 5. It just so happens that they are the 2010, 2011 and 2012 models. This year's "better" iPhone was last year's "best" iPhone. Apple didn't have to create another model to fill that midrange spot... they just kept iPhone 4S in production. It's a good way to down on costs.
True... but considering the iPhone is on a two-year "tick-tock" design schedule.... the "S" makes more sense. Plain number for the first year of the model... "S" for the second year.But I don't think the name really matters in the end. If someone wants an iPhone... they still choose between the newest iPhone or one of the older iPhones.Whether you're faced with this:iPhone 4SiPhone 5iPhone 5SOr this:iPhone 5iPhone 6iPhone 7You can easily make a decision.
I don't think the iPhone naming system is confusing at all. There's always one current iPhone for sale... and 2 more (last year's and the year before)Sometimes the current model has an "S" and other times it doesn't. But that shouldn't matter. All you need to be aware of is which one is the newest... and that the older ones follow behind it.When the iPhone 4 came out... it was the newest iPhone. When the iPhone 4S came out... it was the newest iPhone. When the iPhone 5...
If buyers perceive that nothing has changed... then that's their problem.Apple's marketing kicks in and TELLS you all the stuff that have been improved.Apple made sure that everyone knew that the iPhone 4S was quite an improvement over the iPhone 4Faster processor, better camera, Siri...I see what you're saying... that a person might not understand what an "S" model is.Then again... Apple makes sure to highlight the improvements. It's kinda hard to ignore "It's the most...
My favorite part was "it's just a big iPod Touch" meaning that a "phone OS" doesn't belong on a tablet device. And then here comes all the Android tablets... a Blackberry tablet... and even a Palm tablet... all from phone manufacturers. Sheesh...
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