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Posts by muppetry

Having thoroughly derailed this thread with English etymology, can we please get back to debating the many ways in which Apple is doomed?
 I think they believe it to be a fishing term.
 Toe rag. Improvised sock IIRC.
 Phew. That was close.
 Yes - not used in "proper" English and you won't hear it from well-educated Brits, but common enough in some areas of the country, including London. EDIT: embarrassing typo fixed.
 I stopped using it when I realized that Americans mostly didn't understand it. I still, surprisingly frequently, discover that other words that I've been using don't really exist over here.
 This exemplifies the disconnect in all these arguments - the fundamental assumption that if the phone can be bent by hand then it is too weak - even though the controlled tests indicate that all the current top phones will bend at or less than 150 lbs force applied to the middle of the phone - a force that any moderately strong human can exert in that manner. The HTC One is measurably weaker than the 6+ and roughly similar to the 6, and yet no one is running around...
 It is not a new word, but it is not particularly old fashioned. It is still in common use.
 OK - what I was trying to explain is that the back plate of the phone (where the cut-out is) is not a significant structural element when it comes to the bending mode in question. A rectangular plate is only stiff about one of its three principle axes - the one that is orthogonal (perpendicular) to the plane of the plate. It is hard to deform a plate in its own plane by shearing or bending. On the other two axes, which represent folding the plate (as is the case here), a...
"Whinge" is common in both spoken and written form. Doesn't seen at all awkward to me, but then neither does "maths". Probably just a function of the language you grow up with.
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