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Maine's expanded MacBook program the 'largest of its kind'

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
The Maine Department of Education said Tuesday that it plans to expand to high school students a program that has provided Apple notebook computers to all of the state's middle school students for the past 7 years, creating "the world's largest educational technology program of its kind."

As part of the deal, the Maine Department of Education announced it has placed an order for more than 64,000 MacBooks for students and faculty in grades 7 through 12, and will place an additional order for up to 7,000 more notebooks in the coming weeks.

The Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI), so it's called, has provided Apple notebook computers to all Maine middle school students since 2002 – making Maine the first and only state with a statewide implementation of notebooks for every student. The high school expansion will see the initiative become the world's largest educational technology program of its kind.

"We have seen incredible success with our middle schools showing increased student engagement and achievement with MLTI in place and we want to bring this same opportunity to our high schools," said Maine Education Commissioner Sue Gendron. "Apple has been a great partner and consistently demonstrates that it understands the need to provide a complete solution that puts education first. We're very excited about the new school year."

The notebook package provided by Apple includes a wide array of educational software, professional development, repair and replacement and technical support. In addition to learning how to use technology, students do research, write and edit, conduct online simulations, and take online tutorials.

The high school expansion is an extension of an existing contract with Apple, which competed for and won both MLTI contracts to date, the Maine Department of Education said.

“This expansion is helping Maine close the digital divide,” added Jeff Mao, director of learning technology for the Maine Department of Education. "About 2,000 public high school students in Maine attended high schools with laptops for all students this year. Next fall, the number will be 22,000 to 28,000."
post #2 of 59
This is a great way to spend tax money in schools. I wish NY wasn't so bad at spending our money, we could have something this great as well.
post #3 of 59
Buying in bulk is cheaper...Anyone have an idea of what they would pay per Macbook? $800 maybe? Great PR for Apple.
post #4 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

Buying in bulk is cheaper...Anyone have an idea of what they would pay per Macbook? $800 maybe? Great PR for Apple.

I don't know, but even if were at cost it would mean that their PC purchase would be more likely a Mac and there may be plenty of parents and friends and younger sibling below grade 7 that would likely move to the Mac because of this. I think in a few years Maine may easily have the highest per capita Mac use in the country. I could be wrong, but this seems like a long term seed for Mac adoption.
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post #5 of 59
I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.
post #6 of 59
Here is a State that understands what is important. In most states, especially in California, they spend the school money for the Prisons Industrial Complex. Shame on you Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Nazi!

Way to go, State of Maine! You have shown that children is the future.
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

What century did you grow up in? Computer knowledge is a necessity for all child in industrialized parts of the world to compete on all scholastic levels. You may not feel that you can learn from a computer but I assure that a computer is an excellent tool for learning.
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post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

This program has been going on in Maine for several years now. I'm sure if the taxpayers felt that it was a waste of money, then it would have been stopped already.

The secret to getting technology into schools is having a curriculum to go along with it. It sounds like Maine has been able to successfully come up with a curriculum that uses the technology to enrich the education of the students. Other schools simply drop a computer or two in a classroom and expect the teacher to use it with the students, and that's when the technology does become a waste of tax money.

I really hope I'm not responding to someone who is simply trolling...
post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

This is a great way to spend tax money in schools. I wish NY wasn't so bad at spending our money, we could have something this great as well.

NYC tried to start a program with laptops similar to Maine. There was an experient in several schools and never published any outcome, wether sucessful or not. I tried to get my school one of the selected sites but my boss was uncooperative.

It is a very expensive proposition to start a program like this and the NYCDOE (New York City Department of Education) is stuck purchasing all computers through Dell at an inflated price.
The cost of a 20" Imac is $1147.53 and the Macbook is $1237.22. It does come with a Applecare for three years and Microsoft Office installed. It sounds like a good price until you think about how many computers the DOE orders. There is no real discount.
For a middle school like mine it would cost $1,855,830. That is 1500 laptops. If all the text books could be loaded on the laptop, the only thing the student would need would to carry would be a pencil, pen and some paper.
post #10 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What century did you grow up in? Computer knowledge is a necessity for all child in industrialized parts of the world to compete on all scholastic levels. You may not feel that you can learn from a computer but I assure that a computer is an excellent tool for learning.

I agree that a computer is good for learning, but these school districts have seen no return in higher test scores for the multi-million dollar purchases of computers, Mac or otherwise. The three R's are best taught in the traditional ways. If we saw a jump in aptitude, comprehension and the like, I would agree with you.

And, the kids don't have to be immersed in computers to be competent with them later in life. Me (30+ years old) and many like me didn't get into them until post high school years. I could barely turn one on after college. Now, I do it for a living. I'm sure most would agree it's really not that difficult.

Just my 2¢.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by taugust04 View Post

This program has been going on in Maine for several years now. I'm sure if the taxpayers felt that it was a waste of money, then it would have been stopped already.

The secret to getting technology into schools is having a curriculum to go along with it. It sounds like Maine has been able to successfully come up with a curriculum that uses the technology to enrich the education of the students. Other schools simply drop a computer or two in a classroom and expect the teacher to use it with the students, and that's when the technology does become a waste of tax money.

I really hope I'm not responding to someone who is simply trolling...

I agree. Most schools don't train the teachers how to use the computers. No, they are not all computer savvy. Most schools don't train teachers how to integrate computers into the curriculum. There is another problem. There is no one on staff at the school to maintain the computers. I do most of the computer repairs and upgrades myself. If you call the city helpdesk, some one comes in a few days to assess the problem and then someone comes a few days later for the repair. I currently maintain 120 computers and will hopefully add another 150 next year.
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

Here is a State that understands what is important. In most states, especially in California, they spend the school money for the Prisons Industrial Complex. Shame on you Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Nazi!

Wow only 6 posts in to get to "Nazi".
post #13 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckmoser View Post

I agree that a computer is good for learning, but these school districts have seen no return in higher test scores for the multi-million dollar purchases of computers, Mac or otherwise. The three R's are best taught in the traditional ways. If we saw a jump in aptitude, comprehension and the like, I would agree with you.

And, the kids don't have to be immersed in computers to be competent with them later in life. Me (30+ years old) and many like me didn't get into them until post high school years. I could barely turn one on after college. Now, I do it for a living. I'm sure most would agree it's really not that difficult.

Just my 2¢.

Students respond well to using computers for learning. It holds their interest and they communicate more effectively. Don't fall for test scores as the be all and end all. It is a test given on one day. If a child has a bad day they can score low. Besides, it is not the same test every year. If politicians want to show how well they are doing they can have the test dumb ed done so the students score higher.
post #14 of 59
While I missed out on the first roll out of laptops to middle school students (I was already in high school), my little sister was a part of the pilot program in Maine. She was assigned a new iBook to use during 7th and 8th grade in middle school and allowed to bring it home every night. And after that two year period, the school department extended an option to purchase the laptops for only $50! Needless to say, virtually all of these kids went that route and had their own machine to use throughout high school. All of the school's classrooms were outfitted with projectors that teachers could connect their PowerBooks to for their lessons. However, the laptops also had special software installed which allowed teachers to "hand out" digital files and weblinks, restrict web-browsing/instant messaging, and allow students to collaborate on projects through their laptops. My step-brother is just entering middle school this fall and will receive a white MacBook on his first day. As reported in the local newspaper, each MacBook/AppleCare/Software/IT package costs the state of Maine about $785 per student - Quite the discount really!

Fall 2009 Maine MacBook Specs: 2.0GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB DDR3, 120GB HDD, SuperDrive. (End of lease student purchase option will be $85 in Spring 2011)

*There is, however, one MAJOR drawback with this program. The state subsidizes the cost of each MacBook student bundle and makes them available to each regional school department for $200 each for use in high schools. The Middle School program is completely funded by the state and is mandatory. The new high school program is optional at this time. About 60% of Maine's high schools will be taking part this fall.

Everything started with a state tax surplus and is being continued with grants and federal stimulus money. This is an excellent program that helps to get new technologies in the hands of our youth and prepare them for today's digital world.
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willier7 View Post

Students respond well to using computers for learning. It holds their interest and they communicate more effectively. Don't fall for test scores as the be all and end all. It is a test given on one day. If a child has a bad day they can score low. Besides, it is not the same test every year. If politicians want to show how well they are doing they can have the test dumb ed done so the students score higher.

Well, if we can't use test scores to show results, what can we use? The point is is the scores haven't improved- the students didn't score higher. I'm just thinking the money could be used better.
And, I don't think this generation has a problem communicating. In fact, I think a little more one-on-one face time would be beneficial rather than the endless texting and emailing.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

Yes it's much better that they learn from 30yr old textbooks!

Shouldn't you be saying "Hey you kids stay off my lawn dagnabit!"
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't know, but even if were at cost it would mean that their PC purchase would be more likely a Mac and there may be plenty of parents and friends and younger sibling below grade 7 that would likely move to the Mac because of this. I think in a few years Maine may easily have the highest per capita Mac use in the country. I could be wrong, but this seems like a long term seed for Mac adoption.

I believe this is the 4th, 5th year?

Maine may already have highest per capital Mac user base, but you are talking about a state that has, what 1.5 million citizens?

There are schools here, that choose to go with PC's - saying that in the real world, Mac's aren't to be found

As a MUG users Group President, I fight this daily, but hey, a few years back, you wouldn't find but a handful of Mac's in the whole state.

What is sorely missing now, is folks to help with tech support, and convincing folks to teach more Graphic Arts programs. If these kids are to get much out of Mac's, and use those skills in Maine, they need to get into graphics.

Using these laptops for surfing the web, may seems cool to the kids, but folks are right saying you can do that on a PC (as long as it doesn't crash).

As a parent, I think it's great, BUT this money would be MUCH better spent, keeping teachers employed, keeping sports on the programs, fixing up some of the schools, at least turn on the heat

Skip
post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

I believe this is the 4th, 5th year?

Maine may already have highest per capital Mac user base, but you are talking about a state that has, what 1.5 million citizens?

There are schools here, that choose to go with PC's - saying that in the real world, Mac's aren't to be found.

Whether a kid get a real world job in a company running Compaq, Dell, HP or whatever is irrelevant. Owning a Mac means you can run Windows, too. With the prevalence of Macs in colleges and even some colleges requiring Mac use while others only recommending it, there is no real world downsize from using a Mac in grade school.
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post #19 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

I believe this is the 4th, 5th year?

Maine may already have highest per capital Mac user base, but you are talking about a state that has, what 1.5 million citizens?

There are schools here, that choose to go with PC's - saying that in the real world, Mac's aren't to be found

As a MUG users Group President, I fight this daily, but hey, a few years back, you wouldn't find but a handful of Mac's in the whole state.

What is sorely missing now, is folks to help with tech support, and convincing folks to teach more Graphic Arts programs. If these kids are to get much out of Mac's, and use those skills in Maine, they need to get into graphics.

Using these laptops for surfing the web, may seems cool to the kids, but folks are right saying you can do that on a PC (as long as it doesn't crash).

As a parent, I think it's great, BUT this money would be MUCH better spent, keeping teachers employed, keeping sports on the programs, fixing up some of the schools, at least turn on the heat

Skip

Well, in case you haven't heard, Macs run Windows
Also, the real benefit to an Apple computer now is that it can run any x86/x64 operating system. Hiring more teachers hasn't been the problem, it's the bar consistently being lowered that matters. I have this argument with the 6 teachers in my family all of the time. They do not get that they really are being paid for the summers off, and the 5 weeks of vacation throughout the year.
It is what is being taught that is the real problem, not the funding for such things.
post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willier7 View Post

I agree. Most schools don't train the teachers how to use the computers. No, they are not all computer savvy. Most schools don't train teachers how to integrate computers into the curriculum. There is another problem. There is no one on staff at the school to maintain the computers. I do most of the computer repairs and upgrades myself. If you call the city helpdesk, some one comes in a few days to assess the problem and then someone comes a few days later for the repair. I currently maintain 120 computers and will hopefully add another 150 next year.

Most schools don't, but the ones that offer training don't get far as long as the teachers DO NOT except training, unless they ARE getting PAID for their time

As a Mac Users Group we offered to train the teachers in our school district, and what we had the first night, was several teachers show up, and ALL ask the same question, "who has the paperwork for us, so we can get paid for this time"?

Skip
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

Why does everyone put down television? There are good TV channels out their like The Learning Channel, Discovery, Home and Garden TV, where people can learn alot especially for those that can't travel the world or work in every industry. Learnt more about Dubai, China, the South Pole research center run by the US, etc. than from any classroom. Good ol' Mike Holmes has taught me alot about house maintenance. Yeah sure, we don't watch them as much as the "dumb" shows you're talking about. Heck, my first lessons about computers were through the "Bits and Bytes" TV series, which is a great computers basics TV series.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

Most schools don't, but the ones that offer training don't get far as long as the teachers DO NOT except training, unless they ARE getting PAID for their time

As a Mac Users Group we offered to train the teachers in our school district, and what we had the first night, was several teachers show up, and ALL ask the same question, "who has the paperwork for us, so we can get paid for this time"?

Skip

Yes, this is what I was referring to arguing about with the teachers in my family. I work about 2k-2200 hours per year to make 67k. They do not work nearly as much, and yet buying pencils out of their pocket seems to them like a complete travesty of justice. I explain to them that the State doesnt pick up the tab for my Van, my ladders, my tools, etc. Why do they expect to be paid for their tools to do their job?

School Days Per Year
School Days Comparison Graph
\t
School Days
School\t180
County Avg\t179.0
State Avg\t182.4
\t
School Hours Per Day
School Hours Comparison Graph
\t
School Hours Per Day
\t
School Hours Per Year
School\t5:45\t1,035 Hours
County Avg\t6:10\t1,104 Hours
State Avg\t6:43\t1,225 Hours
This is from http://new-york.schooltree.org/priva...my-005533.html

Just to do the math, because their argument is they work at home grading papers as well, if you nearly double the time and say they work 10 hour days for 180 days, that is 1800 hours. Not bad for 60-65K a year (many, many teachers make well over that figure btw), with summers off and crazy vacation time during the year as well.
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

Here is a State that understands what is important. In most states, especially in California, they spend the school money for the Prisons Industrial Complex. Shame on you Arnold Schwarzenegger, the N**i!

Way to go, State of Maine! You have shown that children is the future.

And you just put it back a few decades.

I would suggest that you edit out your malicious comment toute de suite.
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

Not bad for 60-65K a year (many, many teachers make well over that figure btw)

And many, many times more than than earn no where near that amount.
Average salary for K-12 in US is ~$52k.
Only 11 states have a average more than $55k.
Obviously that will go up/down based on location.

http://dcjobsource.com/teachersalaries.html
(other sites are comparable)
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

Yes, this is what I was referring to arguing about with the teachers in my family. I work about 2k-2200 hours per year to make 67k. They do not work nearly as much, and yet buying pencils out of their pocket seems to them like a complete travesty of justice. I explain to them that the State doesnt pick up the tab for my Van, my ladders, my tools, etc. Why do they expect to be paid for their tools to do their job?

School Days Per Year
School Days Comparison Graph
\t
School Days
School\t180
County Avg\t179.0
State Avg\t182.4
\t
School Hours Per Day
School Hours Comparison Graph
\t
School Hours Per Day
\t
School Hours Per Year
School\t5:45\t1,035 Hours
County Avg\t6:10\t1,104 Hours
State Avg\t6:43\t1,225 Hours
This is from http://new-york.schooltree.org/priva...my-005533.html

Just to do the math, because their argument is they work at home grading papers as well, if you nearly double the time and say they work 10 hour days for 180 days, that is 1800 hours. Not bad for 60-65K a year (many, many teachers make well over that figure btw), with summers off and crazy vacation time during the year as well.

There are lot of problems in education and I do not want to hikack this thread. The number of days students spend in school is set by an agricultural calender so students could help on the farm. Yes it is antiquated and should be changed.
Teachers after a few years on the job, in NY make about $67,000. It is not a lot when you are required to get a masters degree plus an additional 30 masters level credits, or an additional masters.
The amount of time spent teaching is only part of the problem. While you seem down on teachers and what they do, try this. Give a party to your child and invite 31 additional friends. Now get them all to sit for the next six hours and teach them several subjects. Do it without any additional assistance from another adult. Best of luck. Most parents have trouble with their own kids on an outing for a shorter period of time.
Buying a few pencils? I spend close to 5 thousand dollars a year for things students should bring to class. Pens, paper, notebooks, glue, pencils, tissues...
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

Buying in bulk is cheaper...Anyone have an idea of what they would pay per Macbook? $800 maybe? Great PR for Apple.

I work for a school in upstate NY and were about to get 75 Macs this summer (replacing PCs) and Apple discounted the educational price of the Macs we ordered. Those Macs are the white MacBooks upgraded to 4GB of RAM, and the 2.66 GHz 20" iMac upgraded with 4GB of RAM. They took anywhere from an extra $130-160 off the already educational institution discount. So yes, Apple is willing to work with people to get them a good deal.

I'm unable to give you the exact prices (confidential), but somewhere in the range of $850 w/2GB and $900 w/4GB. This was for around 60 white MacBooks.

Also, the price of AppleCare was discounted....

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post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

And I suppose you think computers are just used as toys and students just sit there and play Oregon Trail all day long.

You have absolutely NO idea what you're talking about. You sound these these annoying parents that love to come to board of education meetings to bitch and complain about things you don't have any clue about, you just think you do. Most people have no clue what its like to run a school district....

I work in a school district and we've seen computers increase students learning abilities immensely, especially students with special needs.

If the computers are deployed correctly and used correctly they can be better than any text book. Some computers are even replacing text books. The more interactive you can get, the more improvements you'll see.

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post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

Buying in bulk is cheaper...Anyone have an idea of what they would pay per Macbook? $800 maybe? Great PR for Apple.


15% OFF


And 65,700 free ipod touches !!


Maine will be swimming with ipod touches soon .
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post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

I work for a school in upstate NY and were about to get 75 Macs this summer (replacing PCs) and Apple discounted the educational price of the Macs we ordered. Those Macs are the white MacBooks upgraded to 4GB of RAM, and the 2.66 GHz 20" iMac upgraded with 4GB of RAM. They took anywhere from an extra $130-160 off the already educational institution discount. So yes, Apple is willing to work with people to get them a good deal.

I'm unable to give you the exact prices (confidential), but somewhere in the range of $850 w/2GB and $900 w/4GB. This was for around 60 white MacBooks.

Also, the price of AppleCare was discounted....

I know Apple will work with you. Best of luck with your laptops. In NYC we are stuck with the mayor's exclusive deal with Dell. You can check the prices at shopdoe, the Doe's online catalogue. My gripe would be with the city and their purchasing not Apple. I will say my experience with the Apple reps have been outstanding. Go Jill Kaufman at Apple.
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

I believe this is the 4th, 5th year?



As a parent, I think it's great, BUT this money would be MUCH better spent, keeping teachers employed, keeping sports on the programs, fixing up some of the schools, at least turn on the heat

Skip

NO no take it back dude . As a parent you would be thrilled that your kids have a great tool to learn like a MBP

These student will be better prepared to face college life.

No teacher will Lose there job if you gave the kids a text book right. There both tools LIKE A PENCIL .

PEACE

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post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willier7 View Post

There are lot of problems in education and I do not want to hikack this thread. The number of days students spend in school is set by an agricultural calender so students could help on the farm. Yes it is antiquated and should be changed.
Teachers after a few years on the job, in NY make about $67,000. It is not a lot when you are required to get a masters degree plus an additional 30 masters level credits, or an additional masters.
The amount of time spent teaching is only part of the problem. While you seem down on teachers and what they do, try this. Give a party to your child and invite 31 additional friends. Now get them all to sit for the next six hours and teach them several subjects. Do it without any additional assistance from another adult. Best of luck. Most parents have trouble with their own kids on an outing for a shorter period of time.
Buying a few pencils? I spend close to 5 thousand dollars a year for things students should bring to class. Pens, paper, notebooks, glue, pencils, tissues...

5k a year is seriously doubtful, like I said there are 6 teachers in my family I see everyday. Just because you deal with 30 kids at a time with no help, do not assume you are the norm. Because 5K on supplies and 30 kids to a class per teacher is highly abnormal, and I would not let my daughter attend your school if that is the case. I am not down on teachers, I am down on the "parents cant do my job so I should get more" or the " my supplies should be paid for by someone else." It's a job, and everyone has to deal with that stuff. It sounds to me like you would see the taxes increased just to get more money in your pocket than laptops for every student.

That said, if you do have 30 kids in your class, nothing would be better than all of them having their own laptops while you can monitor their screens from yours, and present to the class on screen.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willier7 View Post

I know Apple will work with you. Best of luck with your laptops. In NYC we are stuck with the mayor's exclusive deal with Dell. You can check the prices at shopdoe, the Doe's online catalogue. My gripe would be with the city and their purchasing not Apple. I will say my experience with the Apple reps have been outstanding. Go Jill Kaufman at Apple.

Apple so far has been absolutely great! They will even be sending a tech down to help us get everything setup. Were primarily a Windows centric school so these Macs will be integrating with Active Directory.

Apple basically came to us earlier in the year and we had a meeting with the superintendent and our IT team about the probability of using Macs in a Windows environment, which obviously can be done fairly easily these days.

Then Apple gave a presentation to the faculty in both the high school and elementary school and they absolutely LOVED the Mac! Some even said they're going to get one for their home use just by the presentation given that day. So that being said, they were very popular and so were getting some Macs.

They will be dual boot computers. Were currently waiting for them to arrive so we can start some massive testing on our network so we know what the Apple tech will need to work on.

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post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

5k a year is seriously doubtful, like I said there are 6 teachers in my family I see everyday. Just because you deal with 30 kids at a time with no help, do not assume you are the norm. Because 5K on supplies and 30 kids to a class per teacher is highly abnormal, and I would not let my daughter attend your school if that is the case. I am not down on teachers, I am down on the "parents cant do my job so I should get more" or the " my supplies should be paid for by someone else." It's a job, and everyone has to deal with that stuff. It sounds to me like you would see the taxes increased just to get more money in your pocket than laptops for every student.

That said, if you do have 30 kids in your class, nothing would be better than all of them having their own laptops while you can monitor their screens from yours, and present to the class on screen.

Gee as a computer teacher, I never thought of that (sarcasm). I purchased the schools copy of ARD. It not only allows me to view the students computers in my lab, but also allows me to monitor all the Macs in the building. I also can install, update software in the entire building.
As a lab teacher I see 400 students a week. 4000 homeworks a marking period as well as 400 projects a marking period. I read and view all of them on my time. While you my know some teachers you are hung up on your own problems. Most teachers are hard working. Not all of them, like any profession. Making blanket statements about their work ethics or the money they make is compared to the time they work is foolish. Maybe you should become a teacher and stop the jealousy and join the easy life you portray.
post #34 of 59
I take it no one on here owns a house.
Otherwise you would see this idea stinks.
Who in the heck would want their MIL rate to go up to buy their neighbors notebooks?
Get a job and buy your own.
post #35 of 59
Try to shut the camera on on a macbook.
Or do you think it is OK for these kids streaming themselves naked over the NET? And meeting people thru the use of laptops that the tax payer supply.
post #36 of 59
Well I also work in IT for a School.
I see students all day in the LABS trying to download warez,set up torrents, use face book and all the other Social crap online. They try all the Proxy sites daily to try to get around the firewall.
I wonder when the kids actually pay attention to the teacher?
The teacher has the ability to shut the computers down with their computer but they don't.
If you think these programs are a success stop fooling yourselves and just say you want someone else to buy you a laptop.
Do a google search and see all the school systems that failed trying to run a laptop program, Maine just isn't reporting the truth behind close doors just like I am not able to tell tax payers what their children actually does at school!
And to top it off I get to call and have websites and blogs shutdown because someone is blogging little Sally is a slut. Which shouldn't be a schools problem!
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenMeanie View Post

Try to shut the camera on on a macbook.
Or do you think it is OK for these kids streaming themselves naked over the NET? And meeting people thru the use of laptops that the tax payer supply.

Assuming you meant, try and turn the webcam OFF....

You can manage any apps that make use of the cameras with OS X Server. Student's wouldn't have rights to install apps. The fact that there is cameras on them actually make them useful for certain things.

This is really a BS argument. Talk about scraping for misc scraps on the bottom of the barrel for an argument against this purchase.....

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5
120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM
AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

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Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5
120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM
AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #38 of 59
I argue with teachers all day long over their pay rates.
Don't like the job leave and get another no one forces you to stay there.
Guess what none of them leave because they enjoy those summers off and the health plans.
And yes after tenure they make way to much $$$ to teach off the WEB or out of a book in CT.
post #39 of 59
And what about when they go home with them?
What about when they try to boot off USB,CD ETC ETC.
I seen all the tricks of the trades and visit other schools and none of this stuff is set up right.
Are you stopping them from throwing another HD in it when the get home? NO.
I go thru this stuff on a daily basis.
And when a parent comes into school to complain you will loose that fight!

Have you ever tried to get a parent to pay for a stolen laptop? Do you have to buy Lowjack at addition cost?
No schools in my area run OSX servers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

Assuming you meant, try and turn the webcam OFF....

You can manage any apps that make use of the cameras with OS X Server. Student's wouldn't have rights to install apps. The fact that there is cameras on them actually make them useful for certain things.

This is really a BS argument. Talk about scraping for misc scraps on the bottom of the barrel for an argument against this purchase.....
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post

I think this is a terrible use of tax dollars. I personally never learned anything on a computer in school that I couldn't have learned from a book. This is needlessly wasteful. Computers are not educational, they dumb you down like TV.

HA ha ha ha ha

Tens of millions of USA students do 100 percent of theIr high school /college work on their computers . And the line keeps s moving to younger and younger grades. My son is in the 3rd grade NYC advanced class.
They have 8 computer labs in his school and his room itself has 4 dells .

Maine rocks . NYC is too big for this ?? NO its too corrupt.

In the UISA we have an army of computer toting kids. A flash mob to end all flash mobs. Sadly i wonder how many KIDS can't find <fill in blank>ON A MAP. .

Yet books are important too. Barnes and noble is always packed.
whats in a name ? 
beatles
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whats in a name ? 
beatles
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