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Apple's iPhone "wrecking" the cell industry - Page 6

post #201 of 211
Yes it appears so.


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Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Or a ploy to pimp your blog \
post #202 of 211
Solipsism listed some good reasons why this is unnecessary.

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Originally Posted by brucep View Post

They kept all options open . They may still sell the iphone and there own Branded phone .
post #203 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

There was nothing grammatically wrong with the spelling, except for that minor issue of it not actually existing as a word, yet.

post #204 of 211
You know what let them say whatever the so called experts say in this case, all I know is the IPhone is incredible and the best phone I have ever had the joy of owning. Also AT&T is a much better company then T-Mobile ever DREAMED of being. After years of being with the sorry excuse of a cell company T-Mobile AT&T is pure class.
post #205 of 211
The iphone "wrecked" the cell phone industry worldwide by:

(1) exposing the weakness in simlocking laws worldwide
(2) exposing the weakness in smartphone statistics --- most of the Nokia smartphones are sold and used as feature phones (the biggest market for N-series 3G phone is China, a country where they don't even have a single 3G network), most of the linux phones are made by Motorola for Asian countries (China in particular) where they are used as feature phones.
(3) exposing the contractual usage terms of carriers worldwide --- most of the carriers already have anti-tethering language in their contracts, people just don't realize them.

The iphone's launch is a GOOD thing for consumers --- because it exposes many of the myths as incorrect.
post #206 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

I agree with your view, but would add the that the analyst is looking at it from the telco's perspective. From their point of view, I can see how the iPhone, and Apple, are a mixed blessing. They just haven't anticipated the volume of data that iPhone users would consume because no other device was as easy and productive to use.

Apple doesn't sit still and the telcos don't seem to be able to keep up with the pace that Apple prefers.

ATT doesn't know the meaning of keeping pace. This is the co. (Ma Bell anyone?) that only offered rotary dial until it was broken up by the US Gov't. for being a monopoly.
post #207 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBG4 Dude View Post

ATT doesn't know the meaning of keeping pace. This is the co. (Ma Bell anyone?) that only offered rotary dial until it was broken up by the US Gov't. for being a monopoly.

It wasn't broken up BECAUSE it was a monopoly. It was broken up because it was felt that smaller companies would be more nimble in upgrading. It was a very complex issue. The government had encouraged that monopoly for decades. But when the company resisted changing some long held rules, the government stepped in.

There were Touch Tone button phones LONG before the government stepped in. Over a decade before. In the early '60's.

The crisis began with the rules for allowing fax machines, and came to a head with modems, and owning your own "feature" phone.

Until much later, the monopoly of AT&T was considered to be one main reason why the US had the best phone system in the world, and the largest. While Europeans were dealing with a lot of small, and not always compatible systems, the one here, and in Canada, which followed our standards, was the leader in quality and reliability.

One reason why Europe and other areas caught on to cell phones in such a big way faster than we did was that fact. Their landlines weren't as good. This was far cheaper to implement that having a major overhaul of all those nationally based systems.

Poorer countries from the Eastern block, with really poor systems were especially eager to get cell.

The same thing is true in many other areas of the world. In some areas, such as parts of Africa, Central and South America and parts of Asia, the stealing of the copper landlines were such a big problem that the phone companies often gave up in moving service out of big cities.

I know some people are not going to like what I wrote, but it can be looked up using Google.
post #208 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Until much later, the monopoly of AT&T was considered to be one main reason why the US had the best phone system in the world, and the largest. While Europeans were dealing with a lot of small, and not always compatible systems, the one here, and in Canada, which followed our standards, was the leader in quality and reliability.

I agree, the same for Australia, it was because Telstra (or Telecom in the day) was a national monopoly that we have a strong national landline and mobile network. It's also been a matter of distance and low population, it's just unaffordable to run copper everywhere so the mobile systems offered the solution.

Now we have a national mobile broadband network that outpaces landline in places.

The network is key national infrastructure and while it is surely off topic i personally feel and observe that it needs to be nationalised infrastructure, the benefits of a unified network technology and simultaneous upgrading are too big to be ignored. Let the companies fight it out over providing retail service and value adds.

The biggest mistake in Australian telco history was the decision to privatise Telstra's retail and infrastructure arms into the one company, its fragmented the network, caused fights over access rights and done nothing positive to the consumer in terms of pricing. The alternative was to sell the retail arm and keep the infrastructure.

Guess what now, the government is getting ready to roll out the "National Broadband Network" because the private telcos all just fight and want to extract more retail profit not build leading infrastructure.

Its one of the strange areas where competition does not create improvements, just barriers.
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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post #209 of 211
With Apple 'Wrecking' the smartphone industry, many copycats will start to spawn..
post #210 of 211
Copycats started right after the announcement of the iPhone in 2007. What we are waiting for is a successful copycat.

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Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post

With Apple 'Wrecking' the smartphone industry, many copycats will start to spawn..
post #211 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Copycats started right after the announcement of the iPhone in 2007. What we are waiting for is a successful copycat.

+1! I'm always somehow tempted by other nice phones that are released but after some time of usage I never like them and that's why the iPhone is perfect for me as a student. The shortest time I bought and sold away a phone was in 2 weeks. A 16GB samsung omnia. Touchscreen was barely responsive and people called it the " true iPhone killer " at that time. Jeez. Isn't that the same situation for the Palm Pee? Oh I mean Pre.
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