or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Blu-ray special features coming to App Store
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Blu-ray special features coming to App Store - Page 3

post #81 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

hmmm....
I think the old betamax crowd see's a final chance to live again here, Except apple already knows that the optical drives are dead just like matte screens and just like fire wire dead dead dead .

SO you can spend money on blu ray and in a few months or couple of years the whole industry will be phased out and replaced by USB 2 or USB 3 data drives . Your money is wasted .
I will never buy a disc again unless it's a transformer level movie.

My MOVIE GUY now gives me usb drives w/star trek on it.

I placed the file on my hard drive and MY MBP DVD player, QUICKTIME player play the movie on perfect quality equal to an itunes movie down load .

A whole industry just died . We just can't see it yet . I wondered about the MBA for a long time. Now I get it . We will have in the near future little SD movie cards or little usb cards or multi movie or large ssd 128 g bricks.

So this whole blu-ray angst going on here is moot and silly . Blu-ray is already obsolete.

9

Not if you own a 42 inch plasma TV. It's the only way to go at this point.
post #82 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

Except that you want to have a physical copy of a file, in addition to having it stored on an HD as a precaution. DVD simply isn't good enough for that function now that the files coming off some video recording devices is so massive. My hybrid camera, for instance, produces huge files and I'd just as soon have something with more capacity to work with. The DVDs I'm burning my files onto are piling up.

Blu-Ray has a place in an HD work flow for the average consumer who is into shooting video. Even if the distribution of professional material is more popular through other means, there is still a point to having a higher capacity optical storage option available for personal use. I assume that DRM is simply not an issue when you're burning your own material but I'm no expert on that subject. I would certainly not be comfortable with having my files stored exclusively on a device that could quite easily fail, taking my video files with it. I realize that optical media is far from secure but having files stored in a variety of forms is a smart thing to do. Putting all your faith in a single storage option is playing Russian Roulette with your memories. It's irreplaceable stuff that becomes far more valuable with age.

As for optical media disappearing as a means of distributing movies and the like, I don't see that happening. What I do see, however, is that the difference in quality between upconverted DVD and Blu-Ray is such that the average consumer will only embrace Blu-Ray if the cost of movies and the players themselves fall in line with what we're all used to paying for DVD. There was a belief that consumers would pay a premium but few will. The sooner Hollywood studios figure that out the sooner Blu-Ray will take hold in a serious way. There are signs that message is sinking in and I hope it does because I'd hate to think people into quality are going to suffer because the average schmuck isn't paying enough attention to bother supporting a superior format. I see the difference between proper HD and upconverted DVD but I also realize that the difference is subtle enough many people, distracted by the details that bombard us daily, simply wouldn't notice. Put in a DVD and it looks pretty good. For most that's good enough.

In any case, Blu-Ray is going to be around for quite some time and be more than a fringe item. It will share the stage, unlike past technologies, but it will be a very popular format. Apple will, eventually, offer Blu-Ray support but it's not something that will happen as quickly as some would like.

See my post here. I would like to add that all dvd media is dead. MY kids now use little game cards for there DS game machines . WE will bypass dvd players for direct movie playback maybe with a roku type machine or your computer . We will buy our movies placed on little storage cards like SD OR USB3 cards.

Permanent storage.

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #83 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Not if you own a 42 inch plasma TV. It's the only way to go at this point.

Why ? Its just a file. A mac mini thru its dvd player or quicktime player can read and play any file. I would not buy so -so movies on dvd anymore > just the 007 level .

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #84 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

That's funny- 'cause none of those things is HD.

HULU is HD .


i think
9

hi res at least
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #85 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

Why ? Its just a file. A mac mini thru its dvd player or quicktime player can read and play any file. I would not buy so -so movies on dvd anymore > just the 007 level .

9

Because nothing looks as good as Blu-ray. And the sound is an even worse story.
post #86 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

That's funny- 'cause none of those things is HD.

HD isn't a prerequisite to having a successful media distribution service.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

HULU is HD .

i think

They offer higher bit rate 480 progressive option. For marketing terms its label HD, but its not officially an HD format.
post #87 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Not if you own a 42 inch plasma TV. It's the only way to go at this point.

Well, mine is 52" and I have compared several movies (BD and iTunes 720p rentals). BDs have slightly better picture quality, but it's not a quantum leap and not worth almost twice the price. The downloaded file is also much more comfortable to use (jumping to different chapters or forward/rewind is instantaneous and stutter-free, while the BD simply sucks). I also get a free iPhone/iPod standard definition version with these movies from iTunes, while the "digital copies" included with some BDs do only play on Windows machines or even only on PSPs.
post #88 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Because nothing looks as good as Blu-ray. And the sound is an even worse story.

so can there be a blu ray drive .
because the dvd is dead .
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #89 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

Well, mine is 52" and I have compared several movies (BD and iTunes 720p rentals). BDs have slightly better picture quality, but it's not a quantum leap and not worth almost twice the price. The downloaded file is also much more comfortable to use (jumping to different chapters or forward/rewind is instantaneous and stutter-free, while the BD simply sucks). I also get a free iPhone/iPod standard definition version with these movies from iTunes, while the "digital copies" included with some BDs do only play on Windows machines or even only on PSPs.

Samsung BD-P1500 here. So I'm watching Heroes Season 2 on Blu-ray and I rewind a couple of times to rewatch a scene. Jeebus, rewinding sucks. I'm not sure if it's just my Samsung that is molasses slow and jerky on rewinds or what. Sigh....I'm really tired of optical discs.

The hyperbole over 720p versus 1080p is a riot. In a well produced disc you'd be hard pressed to see the difference on a 40" + HDTV. So the whole

"I need Blu-ray for my Macbook Pro" (that cannot display 1080p on less than the 17") claims are a bit interesting.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #90 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

HD isn't a prerequisite to having a successful media distribution service.



They offer higher bit rate 480 progressive option. For marketing terms its label HD, but its not officially an HD format.

On my mac is looks great, When I stream hulu to my 34" 1080p only New video looks pretty good .
Netflix streamed thru the roku box looks fantastic on my 1080p .
not a disc in sight anywhere.

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #91 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

hmmm....
I think the old betamax crowd see's a final chance to live again here, Except apple already knows that the optical drives are dead just like matte screens and just like fire wire dead dead dead .

SO you can spend money on blu ray and in a few months or couple of years the whole industry will be phased out and replaced by USB 2 or USB 3 data drives . Your money is wasted .
I will never buy a disc again unless it's a transformer level movie.

So this whole blu-ray angst going on here is moot and silly . Blu-ray is already obsolete.

9

So if you choose to pick up your media by another method, everybody else will just imitate your moves? Not.

There is no media delivery war in the sense that there isn't going to be a clear-cut winner. Different strokes for different folks. You get your movies one way. I choose another route and somebody else yet another method. This isn't really a new development. For years I didn't buy so much as a single DVD, choosing instead a subscription service via cable. Did stores stop selling DVDs?
post #92 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Samsung BD-P1500 here. So I'm watching Heroes Season 2 on Blu-ray and I rewind a couple of times to rewatch a scene. Jeebus, rewinding sucks. I'm not sure if it's just my Samsung that is molasses slow and jerky on rewinds or what. Sigh....I'm really tired of optical discs.

The hyperbole over 720p versus 1080p is a riot. In a well produced disc you'd be hard pressed to see the difference on a 40" + HDTV. So the whole

"I need Blu-ray for my Macbook Pro" (that cannot display 1080p on less than the 17") claims are a bit interesting.

You will need 1080p down the road .

The very large tv's need 720 or 1080p or their picture would suffer greatly .

i bought a 32 " 1080p and have only twice in a year seen that the 1080p is on
720P does rock thou star wars looks fantastic

So would an hd movie DL be an overkill for a 15" MBP ?

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #93 of 167
100" Screen with projector hooked to macbook. I can obviosly tell the difference in in video quality between a DL file and a BD. BD has far better color saturation and zero pixelation. BD also has a much higher data rate. On that note, it is possible to download better HD movies than those on iTunes
I personally would never buy an optical disc period. So much clutter. Give me a holographic drive and I'm set.
[center] "Hey look, it's in the center. I am SO cool!"[/center]
Reply
[center] "Hey look, it's in the center. I am SO cool!"[/center]
Reply
post #94 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

I will never buy a disc again unless it's a transformer level movie.

You mean a brainless POS movie aimed at adolescent boys getting their first major shot of testosterone? That's somewhat telling...

As for this theoretical future that everyone keeps talking about with instant HD streaming, movies on SD cards and/or USB 2/3 drives, well, good luck with that. Feel free to sit around and wait for that. Blu-Ray is here and now and delivers quality and convenience that no other current media delivers. I'll be happy to support high-quality HD downloads or flash-based delivery if/when they arrive, but until then I'm going to enjoy Blu-Ray. Life's too short to sit around waiting.
post #95 of 167
Its about looking at current and long term trends.

Since 2000 watching movies on DVD has been the most popular trend. Other forms of media distribution have had to compete with DVD to gain consumer attention. Cable companies are using HD broadcast and video on demand as additional service to entice consumer use. It is an effective strategy as cable subscriptions are at a high. The advantage for cable is that it allows people would rather watch anything they want, when they want, without waiting or leaving the house. Cable companies are looking into effective methods of streaming video content. To continue to extend its services and convenience, at some point cable will get into streaming to portable media devices.

Physical media will become of less usefulness and importance as the market moves in this direction.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

So if you choose to pick up your media by another method, everybody else will just imitate your moves? Not.

There is no media delivery war in the sense that there isn't going to be a clear-cut winner. Different strokes for different folks. You get your movies one way. I choose another route and somebody else yet another method. This isn't really a new development. For years I didn't buy so much as a single DVD, choosing instead a subscription service via cable. Did stores stop selling DVDs?
post #96 of 167
The point that's missed. No one is sitting around waiting for HD streaming. Most people don't need HD streaming. Far more people are watching upscaled DVD on HDTV's than those watching Blu-ray. What we have right now is good enough for most.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

As for this theoretical future that everyone keeps talking about with instant HD streaming, movies on SD cards and/or USB 2/3 drives, well, good luck with that. Feel free to sit around and wait for that. Blu-Ray is here and now and delivers quality and convenience that no other current media delivers. I'll be happy to support high-quality HD downloads or flash-based delivery if/when they arrive, but until then I'm going to enjoy Blu-Ray. Life's too short to sit around waiting.
post #97 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Samsung BD-P1500 here. So I'm watching Heroes Season 2 on Blu-ray and I rewind a couple of times to rewatch a scene. Jeebus, rewinding sucks. I'm not sure if it's just my Samsung that is molasses slow and jerky on rewinds or what. Sigh....I'm really tired of optical discs.

Well, I have the Pioneer LX 71, which is commonly considered to be one of the faster ones and even on that machine forward/rewind is almost unusable. It is really not fun at all. Another issue outside the US is of course that BD prices have not really adjusted here. Heroes Season 2 on BD is 70 EUR (100 USD) over here, the 720p version on iTunes is 29.99 and looks and sounds great (5.1).

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

The hyperbole over 720p versus 1080p is a riot. In a well produced disc you'd be hard pressed to see the difference on a 40" + HDTV. So the whole
"I need Blu-ray for my Macbook Pro" (that cannot display 1080p on less than the 17") claims are a bit interesting.

Absolutely. I have quite a few BDs that do not even look significantly better than upscaled widescreen DVDs, some look even grainier than the DVD. Fortunately I did not pay much for them, as I got 15 free BDs when buying the player.
post #98 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

Well, we don't know that, but as BD is still creeping around 3% of the movie market in the US and even less globally (in most of Asia it will likely not even take off at all, as they work on an alternate cheaper format), there is little reason to believe that adding a BD drive would really help sales. Especially since the major part of Apple's computer business is laptops and the price of slim BD writers is still prohibitive. Raising the price by 300 - 400 USD just to cater for 3% of the audience would not really help right now.

Your numbers are about a year and a half out of date, Blu-Ray is around 10-15% unit sales in the US, depending on the week.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Right after DVD overtook VHS and before Hulu.

I don't think Hulu and Blu-Ray markets are the same. Hulu isn't better than standard definition.
post #99 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Your numbers are about a year and a half out of date, Blu-Ray is around 10-15% unit sales in the US, depending on the week.

I do not know the actual numbers for 2009, but the 3% figure is not a year and a half old either. It is actually the official number reported for all of 2008 by the DEG (http://www.dvdinformation.com/News/p...009yearEnd.htm).
post #100 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

The point that's missed. No one is sitting around waiting for HD streaming. Most people don't need HD streaming. Far more people are watching upscaled DVD on HDTV's than those watching Blu-ray. What we have right now is good enough for most.

And you've hit the nail on the head why blu-ray will take so long to gain decent penetration levels - Joe Public is very happy with upscaled SD dvd's and broadcasts and generally *can't* tell the difference ...

The analagies with tape/cd or video/dvd fall over in this respect as the new medium surpassed the old by a significant amount in either quality or ease of use or both ...

Upscaling quality is just too good for itself ;-)

Jon
post #101 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

You mean a brainless POS movie aimed at adolescent boys getting their first major shot of testosterone? That's somewhat telling...

As for this theoretical future that everyone keeps talking about with instant HD streaming, movies on SD cards and/or USB 2/3 drives, well, good luck with that. Feel free to sit around and wait for that. Blu-Ray is here and now and delivers quality and convenience that no other current media delivers. I'll be happy to support high-quality HD downloads or flash-based delivery if/when they arrive, but until then I'm going to enjoy Blu-Ray. Life's too short to sit around waiting.


hja ha
NO I MEANT High Quality type of blockbuster movie MAY be worth having in blu ray if a blu ray player was cheap enough . How many formats do we need ??

You don't have to wait . The usb/sd movie files are already here.

The question is my fine feathered friend is can we get raw blu ray files and how can we play them back . Already my dvd player at home is almost forgotten between hulu netflixs roku and playing raw file from my mac ./

Yes old beta max tapes are cute .
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #102 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

So if you choose to pick up your media by another method, everybody else will just imitate your moves? Not.

There is no media delivery war in the sense that there isn't going to be a clear-cut winner. Different strokes for different folks. You get your movies one way. I choose another route and somebody else yet another method. This isn't really a new development. For years I didn't buy so much as a single DVD, choosing instead a subscription service via cable. Did stores stop selling DVDs?

Right? Remeber all the VHS rentals stores- I can count on one hand the number of times I rented a tape.
post #103 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

Well, mine is 52" and I have compared several movies (BD and iTunes 720p rentals). BDs have slightly better picture quality, but it's not a quantum leap and not worth almost twice the price. The downloaded file is also much more comfortable to use (jumping to different chapters or forward/rewind is instantaneous and stutter-free, while the BD simply sucks). I also get a free iPhone/iPod standard definition version with these movies from iTunes, while the "digital copies" included with some BDs do only play on Windows machines or even only on PSPs.

Well you must have an old Blu-ray maching because no one would say Blu-ray sucks to skip chapters as compared to anything else. It lets you browse and switch while the movie plays!
post #104 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

You will need 1080p down the road .

The very large tv's need 720 or 1080p or their picture would suffer greatly .

i bought a 32 " 1080p and have only twice in a year seen that the 1080p is on
720P does rock thou star wars looks fantastic

So would an hd movie DL be an overkill for a 15" MBP ?

It's not strict screen size. It's really a factor of field of view. a 15" screen at 30" is functionally same as
a 60" at 10ft (120"), assuming your eyes focus equally well at both distances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

I do not know the actual numbers for 2009, but the 3% figure is not a year and a half old either. It is actually the official number reported for all of 2008 by the DEG (http://www.dvdinformation.com/News/p...009yearEnd.htm).

OK, it's still somewhat true, because it averages down because of the growth over time. The data is an average of a year in age. BD sales went from less than 1% at the beginning of the year to about 10% at the end of the year, going by Nielsen VideoScan numbers.
post #105 of 167
I was using Hulu in a generic sense. For the average consumer free video streaming makes buying a $30 disc a less enticing proposition.

Or even using Netflix. $10 a month for unlimited streaming makes a $30 disc less enticing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I don't think Hulu and Blu-Ray markets are the same. Hulu isn't better than standard definition.
post #106 of 167
You are probably not very old. Back in the 80's renting the VHS tape was the only option for watching movies that weren't at the theater. Other than randomly waiting for them to come on network television.

Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Right? Remeber all the VHS rentals stores- I can count on one hand the number of times I rented a tape.
post #107 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Well you must have an old Blu-ray maching because no one would say Blu-ray sucks to skip chapters as compared to anything else. It lets you browse and switch while the movie plays!

It is a Pioneer LX 71 and was released in September 2008 (in Germany at least). Skipping chapters is clearly slower than on a DVD player and severely slower than downloads. Fast forward and rewind is pretty close to a nightmare. I do not think it has something to do with the machine, a good friend has the Sony BDP-S5000ES which is a bit newer and more than twice as expensive and it behaves exactly the same.
post #108 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

hmmm....
I think the old betamax crowd see's a final chance to live again here, Except apple already knows that the optical drives are dead just like matte screens and just like fire wire dead dead dead .

SO you can spend money on blu ray and in a few months or couple of years the whole industry will be phased out and replaced by USB 2 or USB 3 data drives . Your money is wasted .
I will never buy a disc again unless it's a transformer level movie.

My MOVIE GUY now gives me usb drives w/star trek on it.

I placed the file on my hard drive and MY MBP DVD player, QUICKTIME player > played the movie in perfect quality equal to an itunes HD movie down load or HULU hi-res mode.

A whole industry just died . We just can't see it yet . I wondered about the MBA for a long time. Now I get it . We will have in the near future little SD movie cards or little usb cards or multi movie or large ssd 128 g bricks.

So this whole blu-ray angst going on here is moot and silly . Blu-ray is already obsolete.

9

I wouldn't say Blu-ray is dead or obsolete yet. Blu-ray movie sales are up. The great advantage of Blu-ray is the players play DVD's which means the HD movies we buy look great on our HDTV and our DVD's continue to play.

There isn't an easy way to get movies on a USB drive onto the HDTV. There are a tiny few that have AppleTV or connect their computer to the TV, but the rest of us are quite happy with discs.
post #109 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

You are probably not very old. Back in the 80's renting the VHS tape was the only option for watching movies that weren't at the theater. Other than randomly waiting for them to come on network television.

Exactly. I think I spent more money on not rewinding the tape than for all iTunes purchases combined :-)
post #110 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

You are probably not very old. Back in the 80's renting the VHS tape was the only option for watching movies that weren't at the theater. Other than randomly waiting for them to come on network television.

Let's see - we had HBO, Cinemax and SHowtime back then. You could also buy them. I'm not talking about at the beginning either- I'm talking in the 90's.
post #111 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

So would an hd movie DL be an overkill for a 15" MBP ?

Whether you prefer discs or downloads, people are buying Blu-ray movies now and they would like to be able to watch the HD movies they already own on their MBP.
post #112 of 167
Cable was just developing in the 80's. If you even had cable in your area, it did not mean your cable provider offered HBO, Cinemax, or Showtime. Even if you have HBO/Cinemax/Showtime, they may not be showing the movie you want to see.

Still in the 90's, VHS was the primary way to watch movies.


Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Let's see - we had HBO, Cinemax and SHowtime back then. You could also buy them. I'm not talking about at the beginning either- I'm talking in the 90's.
post #113 of 167
When the heck is apple and the movie industries going to realized we're not going to buy movies we already own from the App Store? There has to be some way to let us download our previously purchased movies into iTunes. I know there are still licensing problems with that but it really sucks that if you want to watch your movies on iTunes or on your computer in general, you have to download them from the App Store or play the disc directly. iTunes already gives the user the ability to download and view audio content without copyright issues. what makes movies so different? that would make the Apple TV much more enticing to purchase in the future. Plus. Why not offer TV shows with commercials? I think Apple is shooting themselves in the foot by not allowing TV shows as free downloads (or at least streaming) to the Apple TV and itunes. They're going to have to figure out some way to do this or else they will be far behind the curve in the coming months and years.
post #114 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

When the heck is apple and the movie industries going to realized we're not going to buy movies we already own from the App Store? There has to be some way to let us download our previously purchased movies into iTunes. I know there are still licensing problems with that but it really sucks that if you want to watch your movies on iTunes or on your computer in general, you have to download them from the App Store or play the disc directly. iTunes already gives the user the ability to download and view audio content without copyright issues. what makes movies so different?

iTunes will only "rip" audio content which is not DRM protected. Absolutely every DVD with a region code (the vast majority) is DRM protected. Unless there will be an official DMCA exemption for at least CSS encryption, Apple will never add this functionality to iTunes and they really can't they depend on the movie industry for content. There are several ways to do it yourself though, see e.g. http://www.macworld.com/article/135137/convert.html.
post #115 of 167
If you do a bit of internet research you will quickly learn that Blue Ray DRM licensing is very prohibitive in terms of what hardware manufacturers are required to do if they support the drives. Computers take a real performance across the board even when the Blue Ray is not in use. Among it's other issues, Vista suffered from it's Blue Ray support. Moreover, the drives still haven't come down in price enough to allow Apple to lower prices in a market recession (as it just did).

Further, Blue Ray stinks. The disks cost a lot, and the DRM hinders format. I want more rights, not less. Jobs is likely holding out for better licensing terms as he should.

Quote:
Originally Posted by holywarrior007 View Post

This is interesting. However, when will Steve Jobs break his reservation on Blu-ray enabled drives in MBPs? It really sucks not have these in MBPs.
post #116 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

I wouldn't say Blu-ray is dead or obsolete yet. Blu-ray movie sales are up. The great advantage of Blu-ray is the players play DVD's which means the HD movies we buy look great on our HDTV and our DVD's continue to play.

There isn't an easy way to get movies on a USB drive onto the HDTV. There are a tiny few that have AppleTV or connect their computer to the TV, but the rest of us are quite happy with discs.

The reason for using a disc was storage , 4 or 5 g of media .
Today the storage train is so fast that you don't need anymore to be tied to a dvd player at or tied to any one type of format .

If the blu ray Encoding is so good, fine tehn a little SQUARE storage card will do just as good as a disc.. NO BD player needed

Of course go ahead and buy and play blu ray and I hope apple accepts this format. I was just amazed that i got a star trek file from a storage card and dropped the file on my hard drive and THE DVD and QT players could play back the raw files . NO handbrake converting needed.

What this means is the overall price for movies will drop to about $7 or $9 dollars for a new movie and $3 to $5 for rentals. AND the bootleggers and their ilk will be out of business and the movie makers will still make a profit .

I would love to own the LOTR on SINGLE USB-3 DRIVE .


ok- ok blu-ray is not dead just the discs and there players are .

peace

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #117 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

MY kids now use little game cards for there DS game machines .

You have kids?

Let me guess, they actually ghost-write your posts for you?
post #118 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Because nothing looks as good as Blu-ray. And the sound is an even worse story.

Being a techstud, I'm sure you have fairly high-end equipment. But that is hardly representative of the general population. Most people either do not have TVs which are capable of showing blu-ray to it's potential (they have 720p or SD sets, or they have cheap, crappy 1080i/p sets) or they sit too far away from the screen to tell the difference between 720p and 1080p. And even fewer have the equipment to take advantage of blu-ray sound tracks. Heck, not that many people even have the sound systems to take advantage of the 5.1 sound tracks on DVDs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

The point that's missed. No one is sitting around waiting for HD streaming. Most people don't need HD streaming. Far more people are watching upscaled DVD on HDTV's than those watching Blu-ray. What we have right now is good enough for most.

Agreed. With a good scaler, and upscaled DVD can look better than my cable company's 1080i. And while blu-ray is obviously better than Comcast, per my points above, the difference would be minor for most people.

DVDs were successful not only because they were better quality than VHS, but because I could enjoy that increased quality on my existing TV. DVDs were also more convenient and more durable than VHS. To enjoy blu-rays increased quality, people need to buy new TVs. And it offers no advantage over DVDs in terms of convenience or durability.

Think of the attempts by the music industry to move to SuperAudio CDs (I think that's what they were called). They offered better sound quality than CDs, but they were quickly relegated to audiophiles only. For the general consumers, CDs were "good enough". I think we'll find that for the next several years, "good enough" in video is 720p. It makes it more appropriate file size to download, and offers a convenience advantage that blu-ray does not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

I wouldn't say Blu-ray is dead or obsolete yet. Blu-ray movie sales are up. The great advantage of Blu-ray is the players play DVD's which means the HD movies we buy look great on our HDTV and our DVD's continue to play.

There isn't an easy way to get movies on a USB drive onto the HDTV. There are a tiny few that have AppleTV or connect their computer to the TV, but the rest of us are quite happy with discs.

As I've stated before, one thing that Apple could do to slow the adoption of blu-ray, if that is their goal, would be to put a DVD drive in the AppleTV. That would allow you to continue to play the DVDs you already own while also giving you access to 720p video (ie, "good enough"), with the advantage to Apple that iTunes becomes your main source for HD video. They should use the AppleTV/DVD as a loss leader to lock customers into iTunes as their future source of video.
post #119 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

You have kids?

Let me guess, they actually ghost-write your posts for you?

ummm !!
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #120 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

ok- ok blu-ray is not dead just the discs and there players are .

I guess you haven't heard about how Blu-ray movie sales have increased. With Christmas approaching, I may soon contribute to the dead.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Blu-ray special features coming to App Store