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Apple's "Cocktail" may spur whole album sales in iTunes - Page 2

post #41 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadicalxEdward View Post

i still don't get why the heck lyrics are a big deal. THEY'RE ***!!!! why the hell doesn't every iTunes download already include the damn lyrics.

You're absolutely right!
+∞

EDIT: Please don't directly quote offensive language.

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post #42 of 119
there was another article on CNET as well that the record companies are making their own version of this. THey first pitched this to Apple and SJ doesn't want any compatibility with outside software. so the record companies are going to have their more open version as well
post #43 of 119
I for one, have purchased many CD's over the years, wanting that ONE song, ONLY to find some real gem's on the CD (songs I hadn't heard, nor would likely have heard had I not purchased the whole CD.

I'm sure Apple will still sell single songs, they will just make it interesting to consider purchasing the whole CD / album if one chooses to.

Hell, you get to listen to all of the tracks before you buy, so why not have the option of getting it for less. I say bring it on, if we like it and it works great, if not then you can't say they didn't try.

Skip
post #44 of 119
i've had an ipod since 2004 and have never bought anything from iTunes. my wife has bought maybe $30 worth. why buy from iTunes when CD rips sound better and you can keep the CD as a backup.
post #45 of 119
There was a time when musicians wouldn't go it the studio to record an album (when 45's were king). All they would record would be the single. One hit; no fodder. I don't see why this can't be the way things work now. It seems to be the obvious way for things to move; now that the product is being consumed as a single, produce it as a single as well.
post #46 of 119
Well I think this is a great idea. With the new pricing schedules, which basically means every song is actually $1.29, the break-even point in my brain is around three songs. If I buy three songs, its likely something else on the album I'll like, so I'll just get the album. This sort of value-add lowers that bar. Kudos.
post #47 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

i've had an ipod since 2004 and have never bought anything from iTunes. my wife has bought maybe $30 worth. why buy from iTunes when CD rips sound better and you can keep the CD as a backup.

Because a CD is $17 and an iTunes album is $10? Because a CD takes up room in my house, which has none, and a download doesn't? Because buying a CD just to rip it is a waste of time, money, and carbon?

Maury
post #48 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galley View Post

It's easy; just don't buy any music made in the last 15 years.

I like my Goldfrapp albums so will ignore that advice

Scary how close you are to being right, though.

I wonder if this device will see a return of the daily newspaper, magazines and such. Perhaps albums of music won't be the only nostalgic media formats it is aimed at resurrecting. I just don't see Apple spending 4+ years developing a device just to suit the wishes of greedy music execs. There has to be a lot more to it than that.
post #49 of 119
Just talks.Interesting ones,but just words.The iTablet,should it ever see the light,will need a LONG DUE international content distribution deal.Apple has had almost all of its growth outside the US and yet they still haven't implemented a tv show and movie sales and rental model in most of the countries.If they don't want to lose the train of digital content they'd better get their act tigether, in my opinion at least

I own an AppleTv and find it a great device,but have to "find" the movies and shows on the internet..
post #50 of 119
I think this is a great idea.

Currently I buy the occasional song from iTunes but I will buy CD's if I want the whole album. Apple's cocktail proposal adds some value to the album and an incentive to buy it from them rather than buying a CD.
post #51 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wil Maneker View Post

Is anyone else beginning to feel that the mantra of "albums have 1 good song and 9 crappy songs" is getting old and tired?

There are good albums that are released each week.


No because it is true. Also, 1 good album and 9 crappy ones
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Forgo Looking At The Past As A Judge; Instead Be a Student.
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post #52 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

not to be unkind but don't you think you are living in the past here? Look around you and ask yourself how many people today lounge around trying to convince themselves that what they are listening to has value?

That last question was carefully stated because what passes for todays albums have no value.

Again living in the past if you ask me. Sitting around listening to music with a girl friend would be considered very getto today. I just don't see people experiencing life that way anymore. The problem is society has wiser up to the music industry for one and two there are a lot better things to do with your life now.

You pulled out some great names from the past there! However I believe the magic back then involved a lot more than album art. These artist where at the front lines of a revolution in many ways and had value in their music. Notably everyone of these groups earned their popularity with fans of many walks and ages.

Contrast this with the pop teenie bopper culture that seems to be so much of the modern music seen. These are not mature worldly musicians with challeging thoughts at all. They are barely out of diapers and have nothing to offer in their music.

The problem today is that there is little focus at all with respect to the adult market. It simply isn't the same industry as before. Consider who went to Woodstock, it wasn't a bunch of thirteen year olds.


I'd go farther and say everthing is a fraud or fabrication. For the most part people can recognize value or substance In just about anything. Except for the teenie bopper market thus all the marketing effort towards that segment. To be really successful a band needs to inspire a vastly wide age bracket than two to three years.

The bands you mentioned above offered up a lot more than bad lyrics and bad behaviour. It's been 15 to 20 years since I've been impressed with a rock or pop group that would justify more than a glance. Frankly I've stopped listening to music the way I did, there are just more satisfying ways to spend ones time. If the music industry has no desire to develop talent and quality then this little program of Apples is doomed to failure. There is just no incentive to bias time in the direction of the music industry when it has fallen in such a disgraceful manner.



Dave


You sound exactly like my great grandfather who refused to admit that The Beatles had any talent at all and just lamented the fall from favor of real musical genres like jazz and how there was no singer that could touch Frank Sinatra. He went on and on about how music died when it went to three chords, how rock guitar solos were like listening to masturbation, etc.

not to flame or anything, but you've basically been saying everybody else is full of crap, so I'll tell you that I think you are completely and totally full of crap. I've bought about 40 albums over the last year or so that I think are phenomenal albums. The reason you don't like any music from the last 15 to 20 years isn't because somehow musical talent has died. Every generation since music has been sold has lamented the death of quality music. You think music is dead because your brain is, by this time, permanently wired to only like music that came out 20 years ago.

Is there a lot of crap out there these days? Yes, there is a ton of crap out there. But, more than any other time in the history of music we have tons of choices, a lot of which are really great, regardless of what musical genres you like.

So you don't like music anymore, that's all fine and good, but it doesn't mean that the actual quality of music has decreased. If anything, going back over my music from the 80s and late 90s, I'd say that music has, if anything, greatly improved since then. Or at the very least, its just easier to access quality music and ignore the really bad fluff. Yes, the Black Eyed Peas are bad. But I can just as easily buy the new Bill Frisell or Okkervil River album as the new Black Eyed Peas album. That wasn't really the case "back in the good old days" if you didn't like what was popular back then, you were kind of screwed, because you didn't have a TON of choice.

I think another problem is that we tend to retrospectively ignore the crappy music from the past. We keep thinking music was better in the 60s and 70s because we only listen to the best from those days. Let me tell you, I recently bought an older guys entire vinyl collection that spanned the late 50s to early 80s and it was very comprehensive. There was a TON of just absolute crap. For every Led Zeppelin there were 5 ASIA, Emrson, lake & Palmers and The Monkees.
post #53 of 119
Does anyone think the whole album story is more a smoke screen and appeasement to the music industry?

That is this will be more a KIndle and Netbook device and yes an oversized iPOD....but imagine the apps that can be made for this size and config.

How about games...with bluetooth controllers
How about as a home appliance, ie: security and remote control
How about phone, stays in the backpack or briefcase with bluetooth headset
How about TV/Stereo, with bluetooth headphones
How about presentation tool, powerpts, video, etc for sales people
How about internet app like Salesforce.com, etc......for traveling business people
How about mobile reservation system for tours, hotels, cruise ships, gate agents, etc.
How about fastfood restrurant POS, work the line for orders, no standing in line.
How about digital signage (maybe too small for this) but wireless signage access to manage crowds at events etc. or tied to a projector....

Just a few, there will be thousands....albums yes, but seriously is that really what will drive this product.....nope
post #54 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionGrey View Post

No because it is true. Also, 1 good album and 9 crappy ones

Well there were 105,000 albums released in the US in 2008; four times as many as in 2000, so using your formulation that makes 10,500 or around 200 per week 'good' and worth buying and taking the time to listen to as 'albums'

Here in the UK we weed out most of the crap and only release 30,000
post #55 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajectory View Post

One way to get people to buy whole albums is to stop putting out 1 hit song + 9 tracks of crap.

Precisely.

And just as the counter point to the inevitable hundreds of comments about "who wants to buy an album" ....

Anyone who is really interested in music, who knows much about music, who is interested in the artists that produce it, or who is an artist themselves ... buys albums. This is not the largest group of music buyers by far, in fact it's probably a minority nowadays, but it's the core music lovers. I would also argue that this group buys a disproportionately large amount of music relative to the general population. They are the industry's "sweet spot" and are worth accommodating for that reason.

It's the same difference between those that love the painter Van Gogh and have a bunch of expensive books of his work, and those that "really like that sunflower picture" and maybe have a poster of it over their couch. Or those that think M*A*S*H was a "really great movie" and those that have all of Robert Altman's movies on DVD from the criterion collection.
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post #56 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post

I just don't see how Apple's tablet is going to succeed where all other tablets have failed. Especially once we factor in Apple's pricing. An overpriced gadget with no clear niche or purpose.

Anyone?

An overpriced gadget with no clear niche or purpose would most definitely fail. However, if Apple comes out with a tablet, it will have a clear niche and purpose. Some may consider it overpriced, but then again there will be nothing on the market to compare it to.

Tablets in the past were not designed from the ground up around touch. An Apple tablet will be. Apple will do what it does so well. Take a market and redefine what it should be. If they can't do that, there will be no Apple tablet.
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post #57 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Because a CD is $17 and an iTunes album is $10? Because a CD takes up room in my house, which has none, and a download doesn't? Because buying a CD just to rip it is a waste of time, money, and carbon?

Maury

You left out the fact that itunes allows for spontaneous purchases. If you decide you want a song/album at 3am, you can get it. Travelling to stores within business hours is a pain if all you want is a CD.
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post #58 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadicalxEdward View Post

i still don't get why the heck lyrics are a big deal. THEY'RE FUCKING WORDS!!!! why the hell doesn't every iTunes download already include the damn lyrics.

I don't know why iTunes doesn't have a 'Get Lyrics' feature in the same way as 'Get Album Artwork'.

My iMac has been using iTunesLyricsLocator to add the lyrics to my entire iTunes library for the last hour, so I'm still waiting to find out how comprehensive and accurate it has been.
post #59 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Because a CD is $17 and an iTunes album is $10? Because a CD takes up room in my house, which has none, and a download doesn't? Because buying a CD just to rip it is a waste of time, money, and carbon?

Maury

who sells the average CD for $17? only special editions and double CD sets go for that much.

with itunes i have to make sure to back everything up or beg support to download everything again. and I can rip CD's with Apple Lossless format, mp3's sound like crap
post #60 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

You left out the fact that itunes allows for spontaneous purchases. If you decide you want a song/album at 3am, you can get it. Travelling to stores within business hours is a pain if all you want is a CD.


that's why there is Amazon
post #61 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Porchland View Post

The tablets failed because they (1) were overpriced, (2) ran on a computer OS that did not translate well to a tablet, (3) did not have good touch functionality, (4) did not work well without a keyboard, and (5) we weren't ready for them yet.

Apple's tablet will not be an attempt to improve on previous tablets; it will be the new iPod touch.

I don't see it as being "overpriced", for one, it's a lame word to use, and another, sometimes technology costs money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RadicalxEdward View Post

i still don't get why the heck lyrics are a big deal. THEY'RE FUCKING WORDS!!!! why the hell doesn't every iTunes download already include the damn lyrics.

It's a copyright issue now, because song writers have a different copyright cartel from the music distribution cartel. Even if the band is the one that wrote the songs, it seems they're stuck in the same quagmire as those that buy the rights to perform songs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Because a CD is $17 and an iTunes album is $10? Because a CD takes up room in my house, which has none, and a download doesn't? Because buying a CD just to rip it is a waste of time, money, and carbon?

Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

who sells the average CD for $17? only special editions and double CD sets go for that much.

People that are dumb enough to pay list price back when Sam Goody was around and then complain about it. If you're going to buy at a shopping mall, you're going to pay mall prices.

Quote:
with itunes i have to make sure to back everything up or beg support to download everything again. and I can rip CD's with Apple Lossless format, mp3's sound like crap

Sorry, bad argument. You should be doing backups whether you're doing CD rips or downloads. Unless you want to re-rip everything if your hard drive dies. Besides, iTunes sells higher bit rate AAC.
post #62 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

who sells the average CD for $17? only special editions and double CD sets go for that much.

with itunes i have to make sure to back everything up or beg support to download everything again. and I can rip CD's with Apple Lossless format, mp3's sound like crap

or, you could buy a portable hard drive, backup your entire music collection in about 3 hours (5 if you have a lot of music) and not have to take up half a room storing CDs. Your hard drive dies, your music restoration process takes up about 4 hours. If your hard drive dies and you have to re-rip 10,000 albums, your restoration process takes something like 10 months.

Additionally, I've never met a single person who can tell the difference between lossless and greater than around 320 kbps mp3. I've never met a person who could tell the difference between 256 kbps and lossless without training and listening to specific pieces that are very hard for mp3 (ie lots of bass below 50 Hz, very hard transients, lots of frequenices going on at the same time, etc). Even a hardcore audiophile, listening to jazz can't A/B 256 kbps and lossless with more than 52% accuracy in any test I've ever seen.

I know a guy who can hear the difference between rechargeable and non-rechargeable batteries in musical equipment. He readily admits that mp3 encoding today is good enough that for 99.9% of the music out there, its completely transparent.
post #63 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Contrast this with the pop teenie bopper culture that seems to be so much of the modern music seen. These are not mature worldly musicians with challeging thoughts at all. They are barely out of diapers and have nothing to offer in their music.

I think it has been this way for a long time. You just grew up is all. I personally never listened to the Monkees as opposed to the Beatles, Let the teenies have there music. I'm sad that you are so discouraged by today's music. I hope you are not trying to find anything worthwhile on an FM station. I invite you to check out Radio Paradise on iTunes internet radio (Alternative) or the rp iphone app - Great Stuff. There you will find a lot of interesting and beautiful new, and old music.

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post #64 of 119
While I agree that most music today (especially from the major labels) is crap, the fact is that the industry (and this includes small independent labels as well) cannot exist solely on single-track sales. Singles worked well in the pre-Beatles 60s when artists went into the studio and recorded two songs in a few hours and released the single in the next week or two. Today, artists fool around for a year, recording and mixing in six different studios with different producers, etc. It's simply not economically feasible and the industry will not survive. Furthermore, music genres have fragmented to such an extent that even popular artists don't sell that many units anymore. That's why labels want to manage and share the artist's concert and merchandising revenue --because there's still money there.

You can talk all you want about how you hate the big labels and how they rip off artists or that CD prices are too high (they're actually less expensive, including inflation, than albums were in the 1960s), but the recording industry really won't survive at all. Between 2007 and 2008, the U.S. industry dropped from $10.37 billion in sales to $8.48 billion (at list prices). In 1999, it was $14.585 billion. At the rate of current decline, there would essentially be no industry left by 2013 (although I suppose if the big labels disappeared, it would provide opportunities for others to take its place). Sales of online tracks are simply not making up for the loss of album sales.

In the late 60s and 70s, when free-form and progressive rock radio came of age, singles were considered the province of 12-year-old girls and albums were considered to be for people who considered the music seriously, much as it had always been for classical, show music and jazz. (Soul labels like Stax and Motown were exceptions - singles were still the main artistic expression until Marvin Gaye and Michael Jackson started releasing concept albums.)

Also, for a culture that is obsessed with trivia and the lives of artists, it has always surprised me that album notes have become considered unimportant. I used to obsess over those notes to identify the studio musicians and writers. I think it's only a positive thing that there's more of a step in this direction. Maybe music will get better when we care less about who artists are dating and their behavior in public and more about who they're recording with.

Musician Al Kooper (early electric Dylan sessions, Blues Project; Blood, Sweat & Tears, Lyrnd Skynrd producer, Rekooperators, etc.) recently put up 50 tracks of his old solo material on iTunes and wanted to include an extensive booklet. He claims Apple wouldn't let him, although I see a booklet is available, so maybe Apple wouldn't let him do the extensive booklet that he originally wanted or perhaps they finally relented. However - you only get the booklet if you buy the "album". I think that's a marketing mistake - it seems to me that if you buy a single and get the booklet, it might generate tremendous interest in buying a lot more tracks.

Of course, reading liner notes won't work on small iPod screens or if you're "doing something else" while listening - I mainly listen while bike riding. But if one can read eBooks on an iPhone or iPod Touch (as many are proposing), they can read liner notes as well.

As for my own buying habits, I still tend to buy CDs. If the artist can't put out an album with a lot of good tracks, I'm generally not interested in that artist anyway. The CD gives me a physical backup, high quality uncompressed audio and the booklet, although I will admit to not being thrilled with all the physical space it takes up). And I've always been a sucker for well-produced boxed sets, especially when Rhino was in its heyday (now it's just a house label), although it's been a long time since I've found anything worth buying.

But I guess I'm a bit old fashioned: I still have 700 vinyl LPs sitting in my living room.

As for the tablet, there's a publishing industry report that Apple has had discussions with publishers about it. My guess is a 10" screen. Movies should certainly look great compared to an iPhone, but why should it be any better than watching on a Mac?
post #65 of 119
People that buy individual tracks aren't into music but the ones to blame for that are the record companies. The huge shift to one-hit-wonders over the past 25 years rather than talent developement over a lengthy contract is to blame. For these kids they know no other model. They're force fed the mainstream fodder on their lousy terrestrial FM station, MTV (do they show videos anymore?) in a video game, movie or commercial. They go out and buy it and listen to it until the next one comes along. As someone earlier mentioned, they don't make time to listen to music because they like it, rather it's something they do while doing other things.

True fans of music continue to buy CD's, vinyl, or download entire albums because they love music. PERIOD.

Bill
post #66 of 119
I certainly love this idea. Yes there are singles bands as the crappy American Idol has shown but for me there is nothing like a wonderful full on artists album creation. Having said that. I choose the CD or LP every time over a digital version.

Can't wait for the remastered Mono and Stereo Beatles boxes coming out soon. The mono version is limited to 10,000 and was printed in Japan with the mini full on LP replicas. It is SO cool and the mixes are the way they albums or originally created.

Beatles downloads? Not for me.

But many will want them.
post #67 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

While I agree that most music today (especially from the major labels) is crap, the fact is that the industry (and this includes small independent labels as well) cannot exist solely on single-track sales. Singles worked well in the pre-Beatles 60s when artists went into the studio and recorded two songs in a few hours and released the single in the next week or two. Today, artists fool around for a year, recording and mixing in six different studios with different producers, etc. It's simply not economically feasible and the industry will not survive. Furthermore, music genres have fragmented to such an extent that even popular artists don't sell that many units anymore. That's why labels want to manage and share the artist's concert and merchandising revenue --because there's still money there.

You can talk all you want about how you hate the big labels and how they rip off artists or that CD prices are too high (they're actually less expensive, including inflation, than albums were in the 1960s), but the recording industry really won't survive at all. Between 2007 and 2008, the U.S. industry dropped from $10.37 billion in sales to $8.48 billion (at list prices). In 1999, it was $14.585 billion. At the rate of current decline, there would essentially be no industry left by 2013 (although I suppose if the big labels disappeared, it would provide opportunities for others to take its place). Sales of online tracks are simply not making up for the loss of album sales.

In the late 60s and 70s, when free-form and progressive rock radio came of age, singles were considered the province of 12-year-old girls and albums were considered to be for people who considered the music seriously, much as it had always been for classical, show music and jazz. (Soul labels like Stax and Motown were exceptions - singles were still the main artistic expression until Marvin Gaye and Michael Jackson started releasing concept albums.)

Also, for a culture that is obsessed with trivia and the lives of artists, it has always surprised me that album notes have become considered unimportant. I used to obsess over those notes to identify the studio musicians and writers. I think it's only a positive thing that there's more of a step in this direction. Maybe music will get better when we care less about who artists are dating and their behavior in public and more about who they're recording with.

Musician Al Kooper (early electric Dylan sessions, Blues Project; Blood, Sweat & Tears, Lyrnd Skynrd producer, Rekooperators, etc.) recently put up 50 tracks of his old solo material on iTunes and wanted to include an extensive booklet. He claims Apple wouldn't let him, although I see a booklet is available, so maybe Apple wouldn't let him do the extensive booklet that he originally wanted or perhaps they finally relented. However - you only get the booklet if you buy the "album". I think that's a marketing mistake - it seems to me that if you buy a single and get the booklet, it might generate tremendous interest in buying a lot more tracks.

Of course, reading liner notes won't work on small iPod screens or if you're "doing something else" while listening - I mainly listen while bike riding. But if one can read eBooks on an iPhone or iPod Touch (as many are proposing), they can read liner notes as well.

As for my own buying habits, I still tend to buy CDs. If the artist can't put out an album with a lot of good tracks, I'm generally not interested in that artist anyway. The CD gives me a physical backup, high quality uncompressed audio and the booklet, although I will admit to not being thrilled with all the physical space it takes up). And I've always been a sucker for well-produced boxed sets, especially when Rhino was in its heyday (now it's just a house label), although it's been a long time since I've found anything worth buying.

But I guess I'm a bit old fashioned: I still have 700 vinyl LPs sitting in my living room.

As for the tablet, there's a publishing industry report that Apple has had discussions with publishers about it. My guess is a 10" screen. Movies should certainly look great compared to an iPhone, but why should it be any better than watching on a Mac?

the lead guy from Foo Fighters recorded the entire first album in his basement playing all instruments. i guess he was bored after Kurt Kobain died.
post #68 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mazzy View Post

I certainly love this idea. Yes there are singles bands as the crappy American Idol has shown but for me there is nothing like a wonderful full on artists album creation. Having said that. I choose the CD or LP every time over a digital version.

Can't wait for the remastered Mono and Stereo Beatles boxes coming out soon. The mono version is limited to 10,000 and was printed in Japan with the mini full on LP replicas. It is SO cool and the mixes are the way they albums or originally created.

Beatles downloads? Not for me.

But many will want them.

i'm not as big a fan as my wife, but the top 6 contestants are usually more talented than most of the music i listen to. last season when that guy sang with Kiss, he sounded a lot better than Gene Simmons in his prime
post #69 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Anyone who is really interested in music, who knows much about music, who is interested in the artists that produce it, or who is an artist themselves ... buys albums. This is not the largest group of music buyers by far, in fact it's probably a minority nowadays, but it's the core music lovers. I would also argue that this group buys a disproportionately large amount of music relative to the general population. They are the industry's "sweet spot" and are worth accommodating for that reason.

or that said people are audiophiles.
post #70 of 119
Maybe I am spoiled (have the great Amoeba Record Store in San Francisco) and pay attention and read music mags, but in my opinion there is SO much great music released now. So MANY great albums. It's just that you never hear them. Audiences are fragmented and hardly listen to radio like they once did. Playlist are very limited. Even MTV hardly plays music videos anymore.

I'm 54 and college radio is still the only real place where I go to find new tunes. Also sites like Pitchfork.

Oh well.
post #71 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R View Post

I just don't see how Apple's tablet is going to succeed where all other tablets have failed. Especially once we factor in Apple's pricing. An overpriced gadget with no clear niche or purpose.

Anyone?

Same way as Apple always reinvents products like phone, music player and personal computer. Its time for a tablet revolution.
Apple had me at scrolling
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Apple had me at scrolling
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post #72 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mazzy View Post

Maybe I am spoiled (have the great Amoeba Record Store in San Francisco) and pay attention and read music mags, but in my opinion there is SO much great music released now. So MANY great albums. It's just that you never hear them. Audiences are fragmented and hardly listen to radio like they once did. Playlist are very limited. Even MTV hardly plays music videos anymore.

I'm 54 and college radio is still the only real place where I go to find new tunes. Also sites like Pitchfork.

Oh well.

I don't think radio is the answer nor television. The answer is social networking like twitter, myspace, facebook etc. Is where people discover new bands and singers. iTunes actually let me discover so many new amazing albums just by clicking on 'Listeners also bough"
Apple had me at scrolling
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post #73 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajectory View Post

One way to get people to buy whole albums is to stop putting out 1 hit song + 9 tracks of crap.

It's not just the label. Any band that does that is not worth listening to anyway.
post #74 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadicalxEdward View Post

i still don't get why the heck lyrics are a big deal. THEY'RE***!!!! why the hell doesn't every iTunes download already include the damn lyrics.

EDIT: Please watch your language.
post #75 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galley View Post

It's easy; just don't buy any music made in the last 15 years.

Seconded.
post #76 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

I don't know why iTunes doesn't have a 'Get Lyrics' feature in the same way as 'Get Album Artwork'.

My iMac has been using iTunesLyricsLocator to add the lyrics to my entire iTunes library for the last hour, so I'm still waiting to find out how comprehensive and accurate it has been.

Its a copyright issue. You don't automatically get the soundtrack with a purchase of a movie right? Or getting actual book with purchase of audiobook.

Same way here. Lyrics are written copyrighted material.
Apple had me at scrolling
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post #77 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mazzy View Post

Maybe I am spoiled (have the great Amoeba Record Store in San Francisco) and pay attention and read music mags, but in my opinion there is SO much great music released now. So MANY great albums.

OK. Please recommend a couple of good jazz fusion bands/albums, and a couple of Zepplin-esqe.
post #78 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Well there were 105,000 albums released in the US in 2008; four times as many as in 2000, so using your formulation that makes 10,500 or around 200 per week 'good' and worth buying and taking the time to listen to as 'albums'

Here in the UK we weed out most of the crap and only release 30,000

Could you provide a link for those numbers?

This is a list of albums released in the USA during 2009 by month. There is also a list for Great Britain.

As you can see, the numbers are far smaller than the doubtful ones you gave.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...leased_in_2008
post #79 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

Its a copyright issue. You don't automatically get the soundtrack with a purchase of a movie right? Or getting actual book with purchase of audiobook.

Same way here. Lyrics are written copyrighted material.

Still, I think it's amusing and sad that the lyrics are performed to music for the already paid license fee, but they want even more money for a text version of the same lyrics even if it's sold with the song.

Getting the lyrics with the music used to be one of those things that was pretty much expected, the norm rather than an exception. Culturally, I don't think it compares well with the sound track being sold separately.
post #80 of 119
Ever since I started buying single tracks off iTunes, I've become much more experimental with my music listening. I'll buy one-off tracks on a whim or a track I like from an artist I don't normally listen to. It's opened up a world of diversity in my music library and I'm sure I spend a lot more than before when buying an album was a real decision. That's also why I dislike the variable pricing - before, I had already pre-decided that I was happy with the price - now I stop and think about it.

I appreciate that the record labels' speciality is in selecting the artists to promote but, when it comes to distribution, they should shut up and listen to Steve.

Listening to a whole album that has been carefully put together can be pretty special, but I think the fault lies with the record companies. They have abused the album too many times by filling out with bad songs and when you've been stung a few times it can put you off ( risk aversion, I think it's called in investing, where you hate your losses more than you love your gains ). They need to learn to market the album experience, and only when it's real, not try to force the issue or trick us.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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