or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Microsoft plans to use Windows 7 to raise netbook prices
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Microsoft plans to use Windows 7 to raise netbook prices - Page 3

post #81 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

What is the price of crap? Becase crap, even at low price, crap is!

Netbooks aren't really all that cheap when you consider what you get. I just bought my daughter a 15.6" Toshiba laptop with 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo, DVD burner, 2 GB, 240 GB and discrete graphics for $379. Why in the world would I want to pay $300 for a crappy 10% netbook with atom processor and no optical drive?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Netbooks are about as far from $1k range as you can get. Increase the price on a $300 netbook by $50, and it's still hardly close to $1k. MS cut the licensing cost on netbooks as a special price class alone, any price adjustment in the netbook class won't make the regular notebooks any more expensive. I think there were restrictions on screen size, CPU speed and RAM to qualify for a netbook license.

I agree that netbooks are not on Apple's radar screen. While it's possible that someone might choose a netbook over a MacBook and then change their mind when the netbooks go up by $50, it's not likely.

The real issue is that Microsoft has been out pushing the concept that price is everything - that someone would be foolish to buy a Mac because it's more expensive than a Windows computer. Buy spreading this "you only need to look at the price tag to choose your computer" concept, they are making themselves vulnerable on the low end. Currently, a Linux netbook isn't much less expensive than a Windows netbook. Add $50 to the Windows netbook, and the Linux system may look lots more attractive - since you're only selling price. When ChromeOS hits the market with Google's marketing clout behind it, that difference becomes even more important.

The 'price is everything' strategy could easily backfire when they raise Windows prices for netbooks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

First they roll out the laptop hunter ads to brand themselves the Walmart of OSes. Now after publicly laying claim to the cheap end of the market they want to move their brand upmarket. In the history of brand management, that is the hardest thing to do. (Harder even than Jack in the Box recovering from a food poisoning event.) VW tried to do it with the $70K Phaeton. That flopped. Walmart tried to do it after suffering from Target envy a few years back. That flopped. Somebody name me a success story.

Well, my company did it in the industrial products category, but it's not well known, so there's no point in naming it. It can be done, but it's very, very hard. More importantly, it requires that you have a powerful, unique selling feature that allows you to command a premium price in some niche. Microsoft has completely abandoned the concept that the OS is worth paying for because they no longer have any unique selling features, so it will be hard for them to go upscale.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Yes!

I still don't understand what MS wants to do here. They couldn't sell them when they were cheaper, so now charging MORE will move product?

Sorry, but I must be misunderstanding something here.

No, you're just witnessing Microsoft's inability to understand marketing and branding. They are completely clueless about how you create a value proposition and are therefore left with lame copies of Apple's humorous ads or the silly "you should buy whatever is cheapest" Laptop Hunter ads.

I particularly love Ballmer's 'rounding error' comments. Sorry, but Apple's share gains are not a rounding error - they're quite real and have earned Apple many billions of dollars - while reduing Microsoft's revenues by at least hundreds of millions of dollars. Just another example of Ballmer sticking his foot into his mouth when he has nothing intelligent to say.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #82 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystigo View Post

I am a big Apple fan. But I own a lot of Microsoft stock. Ballmer is driving me crazy. He should not be in charge of Microsoft. His vision seems to consist of dismissing real competitive threats when they appear, and then blindly and belatedly chasing the markets he scoffed at months before.

This is costing me a fortune.

As someone that owns quite a few Apple stock, Ballmer is just about my best friend. He really seems clueless about how to move his company forward. He makes the same mistakes over and over! As much as I hate Bill Gates he is a very smart business man and Ballmer is nowhere near in his league.

If Apple is only in the rounding error, than why is M$ spending so much money to counter Apple? I think I can smell his fear! Whether or not is justified is another topic.

Personally, in the computer market I think Apple is about the right size, a little growth is good but not explosive growth. I think its Apple's increasingly moving into and creating new markets is where its future is... iPod, iPhone, Apple TV, iTablet/iBookReader. In the long run the personal computer is a dead end. Computing is moving to mobile devices for the home and at least in part for the office.
post #83 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by westech View Post

If the iTablet appears at the very least it will be a big iTouch, and probably will include iWorks as well. Without question it will be more capable than any net book or cheap MS based OS entry. At a price point of $600 to $800 it will sell like hot cakes. Who knows where this will go?

No keyboard, no sale. \
post #84 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

No keyboard, no sale. \

Funny, that's what that negative, foot dragging obstructionist Steve Ballmer said about the iPhone.
post #85 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by westech View Post

Funny, that's what that negative, foot dragging obstructionist Steve Ballmer said about the iPhone.

The whole tech industry is full of irony. The so-called tech nerds fail in seeing the irony in many tech events.

Mac Pro Dual 2.8 Quad (2nd gen), 14G Ram, Two DVD-RW Drives, OS X 10.9
Mac Book Pro Core 2 Duo 2.16Ghz, SuperDrive, ATI X1600, 2GB RAM, OS X 10.7
1TB Time Capsule

Reply

Mac Pro Dual 2.8 Quad (2nd gen), 14G Ram, Two DVD-RW Drives, OS X 10.9
Mac Book Pro Core 2 Duo 2.16Ghz, SuperDrive, ATI X1600, 2GB RAM, OS X 10.7
1TB Time Capsule

Reply
post #86 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post

And this relates to Apple how?
Apple currently has no netbook.

OS X runs really well on them, lot of people buy netbooks specifically to install OS X. Netbooks are a common Mac platform, even if Apple doesn't make one.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think there were restrictions on screen size, CPU speed and RAM to qualify for a netbook license.

Sure, but the restrictions were to the claimed specs, not the actual specs. My HP Mini officially only supports 1GB RAM max, because that's the limit MS put on HP for their XP license. Yet, I have 4GB of DDR2 RAM in it running just fine.
post #87 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Sure, but the restrictions were to the claimed specs, not the actual specs. My HP Mini officially only supports 1GB RAM max, because that's the limit MS put on HP for their XP license. Yet, I have 4GB of DDR2 RAM in it running just fine.

Maybe it's splitting hairs on my part, I'd call that a win. Is it XP that is running on yours, or are you using OS X on it?
post #88 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by westech View Post

Funny, that's what that negative, foot dragging obstructionist Steve Ballmer said about the iPhone.

The iPhone is not a netbook. Neither will the iPad be, if it doesn't have a keyboard. That's all I was saying. For those of us who want a computer, neither will suffice.
post #89 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

For those of us who want a computer, neither will suffice.

That statement could mean many things. What do you mean? Clarify it.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #90 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

That statement could mean many things. What do you mean? Clarify it.

After a post which said an Apple iTablet would be more capable than any netbook, I said "no keyboard, no sale." That was followed up by a comment implying because I wanted a keyboard, I was being negative.

I own an iPod touch and find it totally inadequate for web and email access or any other computing purpose except in a REAL PINCH when no computer is available. While an iPad/tablet with a larger screen might be slightly better; with no keyboad, I wouldn't consider it a real computer. I wouldn't want to type this post on a virtual on-screen keyboard.

Despite its Windows OS, my netbook is great. No iPhone, iTouch or iTablet will ever be more capable, in my opinion, unless I want to make a phone call; mainly because it won't likely have a keyboard.
post #91 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

The iPhone is not a netbook. Neither will the iPad be, if it doesn't have a keyboard. That's all I was saying. For those of us who want a computer, neither will suffice.

Right. It's not all things to all people. But it will be suitable for light communication, e-mail, short letters. It will be even more limited in handling spreadsheets. It will cost less than a MacBook and do less. Sorry I jumped down your throat,
post #92 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

After a post which said an Apple iTablet would be more capable than any netbook, I said "no keyboard, no sale." That was followed up by a comment implying because I wanted a keyboard, I was being negative.

I own an iPod touch and find it totally inadequate for web and email access or any other computing purpose except in a REAL PINCH when no computer is available. While an iPad/tablet with a larger screen might be slightly better; with no keyboad, I wouldn't consider it a real computer. I wouldn't want to type this post on a virtual on-screen keyboard.

Despite its Windows OS, my netbook is great. No iPhone, iTouch or iTablet will ever be more capable, in my opinion, unless I want to make a phone call; mainly because it won't likely have a keyboard.

Oh I get you now. The good news is Apple sell laptops with physical keyboards, so if you want a physical keyboard and a Mac, you can get one of those. This tablet will be virtual on the keyboard stuff. Though, that doesn't not make it a computer. It just makes it a computer that doesn't suit your needs / meet your tastes.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #93 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Oh I get you now. The good news is Apple sell laptops with physical keyboards, so if you want a physical keyboard and a Mac, you can get one of those. This tablet will be virtual on the keyboard stuff. Though, that doesn't not make it a computer. It just makes it a computer that doesn't suit your needs / meet your tastes.

Call me old-fashioned but I like the laptop form factor. I wish Apple made a small laptop, somewhat like the old 12" PowerBook, only smaller and lighter. I get a little annoyed when people say "the iPhone is good enough."

If Apple is preparing to introduce some kind of tablet, I hope they will also introduce a new small laptop style computer. I'd pay a reasonable price for it, but NOT what they ask for a MacBook Air. Otherwise, I'll be happy my Windows netbook, and will probably buy a new one early next year with Windows 7.
post #94 of 128
I think this article comes under the category of "we're just going to be negative about something MS have said because there MS". The closest thing to a Netbook Apple make is twice as expensive and all MS have said is there going to charge more for Windows on a Netbook to make more cash, what investor out there is arguing "no you should keep giving windows away"?

The netbooks I saw running Linux were the early one's of which the people I know that bought them either installed Windows on them, or we're really geeky people and were thus into Linux anyway. Since then all the ones I see in shops run XP. Given that pre-sales of Windows 7 are going really well there's not much to say at the moment that people wont want Windows 7 on a Netbook.

The only people that should really be worried about Netbooks is Apple. All there products are at the top end of the market which has been fine while they were only a few hundred more than a PC, and people would pay the extra for the nice design and more power. But if your a home user that mainly wants a machine for email, internet, photo's and music and you can get 3 netbooks for the price of an Apple Macbook and it will still do the things you want it to do, then an Apple Mac is starting to look very very expensive just to have it look a little nicer.
post #95 of 128
Quote:
The real issue is that Microsoft has been out pushing the concept that price is everything - that someone would be foolish to buy a Mac because it's more expensive than a Windows computer. Buy spreading this "you only need to look at the price tag to choose your computer" concept, they are making themselves vulnerable on the low end. Currently, a Linux netbook isn't much less expensive than a Windows netbook. Add $50 to the Windows netbook, and the Linux system may look lots more attractive - since you're only selling price. When ChromeOS hits the market with Google's marketing clout behind it, that difference becomes even more important.

The 'price is everything' strategy could easily backfire when they raise Windows prices for netbooks.

I think you've got your head in the clouds if you think a $50 increase in the cost of a netbook is going to make everyone switch over to Linux. In return for a $100 saving, you have to spend hours/days/weeks/eternity trying to figure out a new OS that isn't very user-friendly. Saying that your time is worth a lot of money seems to be a fashionable comment around here, so it amazes me that your time figuring out a new OS is only worth $100. People will stick with what they know, even if it is $50 more expensive - Linux simply has no chance of ever becoming a mainstream OS. Not a chance in hell.
post #96 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by timgriff84 View Post

I think this article comes under the category of "we're just going to be negative about something MS have said because there MS". The closest thing to a Netbook Apple make is twice as expensive and all MS have said is there going to charge more for Windows on a Netbook to make more cash, what investor out there is arguing "no you should keep giving windows away"?

You seem to have missed the point of the article.

If, as you say, Apple has a product that is twice the price.... but the price of netbooks rise.... then the price differential will drop. Simple.
post #97 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

Will the OEMs start offering netbooks with Linux more frequently, or even Android or Chrome?

Android and ChromeOS are Linux. For that matter, so is Intel's Moblin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrochester View Post

I think you've got your head in the clouds if you think a $50 increase in the cost of a netbook is going to make everyone switch over to Linux. In return for a $100 saving, you have to spend hours/days/weeks/eternity trying to figure out a new OS that isn't very user-friendly. Saying that your time is worth a lot of money seems to be a fashionable comment around here, so it amazes me that your time figuring out a new OS is only worth $100. People will stick with what they know, even if it is $50 more expensive - Linux simply has no chance of ever becoming a mainstream OS. Not a chance in hell.

And so people have repeatedly chanted over and over again for almost two decades. Yet, the numbers continue to rise. BTW, you do know that Apple's success disproves the BS claim that people "stick with what they know", right? Anyone who claims OSX works like Windows is insane.
post #98 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkPhoenix View Post

Android and ChromeOS are Linux. For that matter, so is Intel's Moblin.



And so people have repeatedly chanted over and over again for almost two decades. Yet, the numbers continue to rise. BTW, you do know that Apple's success disproves the BS claim that people "stick with what they know", right? Anyone who claims OSX works like Windows is insane.

The numbers might fluctuate a bit, but it'll never become a mainstream OS. With Apple, a lot of people have actually tried out their stuff before buying a Mac, and OSX is actually reasonably easy to use, unlike Linux. It wouldn't say much about the usability of OSX if you thought it was just as easy/hard to get to grips with as Linux!
post #99 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post

And this relates to Apple how?
Apple currently has no netbook.

Since this article has no Apple relavance, then it only has one purpose being posted here.

Please, focus on Apple products and such. I'm not here to read about M$ and their blunders. I want to read about Apple and their blunders (of which there are many)

It is relevant be cause MS specifically talked about Apple.
I find these interesting and am more than happy for them to be on AppleInsider.
post #100 of 128
All this just seems more like Apple envy and lack of direction to me. Recent reports show that Apple is doing well in the high-end of the market; therefore, MS wants to be in the high-end of the market. People who think there is more to it than that are over thinking it. It is painfully clear that MS don't have a plan. Watch closely kids. These events will be forever taught in business schools under the segment, "what not to do!"
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
post #101 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

All this just seems more like Apple envy and lack of direction to me. Recent reports show that Apple is doing well in the high-end of the market; therefore, MS wants to be in the high-end of the market. People who think there is more to it than that are over thinking it. It is painfully clear that MS don't have a plan. Watch closely kids. These events will be forever taught in business schools under the segment, "what not to do!"

Since when were netbooks high end devices?
post #102 of 128
After selling Dell netbooks and playing around with a few, I bought my preferred version of a "netbook".

It's a 13" Aluminium MacBook, it is well worth the extra cost, I have iWork and Open Office, apparently I can get a 30 day trial of MS Office but I can't be bothered.

I am not restricted by my network so tethering my iPhone works fine (Yay, Australia five carriers all with iPhones and a law which says they must be able to be unlocked, which mine is).

I have also used Linux for the last few years, you click Firefox and you're on the web, Thunderbird you're reading your email, attachments from your Windows centric friends or work open in Open Office you can edit them and send them back in the MS format (Office 2007 is a bit broken).

You mouse over files and music plays, pictures pop up, documents are previewed it's like a supercharged version of Preview that's there all the time.

If anyone thinks Linux is hard to use I suggest you download a distribution on a live CD and have a play.

Ubuntu, Knoppix, PCLinuxOS take your pick, when you're done you eject the CD and it's gone.

The only thing missing is iTunes and MobileMe, which won't work without Windows or OSX and here I am back to the main reason I bought my MacBook "netbook", I just couldn't be bothered fixing Windows again on my old Linux/XP PC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrochester View Post

I think you've got your head in the clouds if you think a $50 increase in the cost of a netbook is going to make everyone switch over to Linux. In return for a $100 saving, you have to spend hours/days/weeks/eternity trying to figure out a new OS that isn't very user-friendly. Saying that your time is worth a lot of money seems to be a fashionable comment around here, so it amazes me that your time figuring out a new OS is only worth $100. People will stick with what they know, even if it is $50 more expensive - Linux simply has no chance of ever becoming a mainstream OS. Not a chance in hell.
A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this...
Reply
A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this...
Reply
post #103 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Why all defensive? Get real. We all know Prince has Apple v MS wrestling matches in his sleep every night

Ireland, you fail on that all-important attention to detail issue. Your remarks about Prince ['s writing style] may very well be justified in general but you chose to criticise the title, which this time was very neutral. If you fail to see this difference, then this reflects back on you.
post #104 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

All this just seems more like Apple envy and lack of direction to me. Recent reports show that Apple is doing well in the high-end of the market; therefore, MS wants to be in the high-end of the market. People who think there is more to it than that are over thinking it. It is painfully clear that MS don't have a plan. Watch closely kids. These events will be forever taught in business schools under the segment, "what not to do!"

What I got out of it is that MS will now start charging for Windows on low end PCs after practically giving away WinXP for a year or so. It makes perfect sense that they should charge OEMs for an operating system.

What confuses me is the way it's said: "the solution to the company's woes will be to increase the price of computers." Huh? MS doesn't sell computers.
post #105 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

Ireland, you fail on that all-important attention to detail issue. Your remarks about Prince ['s writing style] may very well be justified in general but you chose to criticise the title, which this time was very neutral. If you fail to see this difference, then this reflects back on you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

What I got out of it is that MS will now start charging for Windows on low end PCs after practically giving away WinXP for a year or so. It makes perfect sense that they should charge OEMs for an operating system.

What confuses me is the way it's said: "the solution to the company's woes will be to increase the price of computers." Huh? MS doesn't t sell computers.

I think that's the real problem with the article and its headline. Microsoft doesn't set the price of a computer that I've heard. The referenced BusinessWeek article isn't any better. It's either poor wording or poor reasoning on the part of the articles here and at BusinessWeek.
post #106 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

After selling Dell netbooks and playing around with a few, I bought my preferred version of a "netbook".

It's a 13" Aluminium MacBook, it is well worth the extra cost, I have iWork and Open Office, apparently I can get a 30 day trial of MS Office but I can't be bothered.

I am not restricted by my network so tethering my iPhone works fine (Yay, Australia five carriers all with iPhones and a law which says they must be able to be unlocked, which mine is).

I have also used Linux for the last few years, you click Firefox and you're on the web, Thunderbird you're reading your email, attachments from your Windows centric friends or work open in Open Office you can edit them and send them back in the MS format (Office 2007 is a bit broken).

You mouse over files and music plays, pictures pop up, documents are previewed it's like a supercharged version of Preview that's there all the time.

If anyone thinks Linux is hard to use I suggest you download a distribution on a live CD and have a play.

Ubuntu, Knoppix, PCLinuxOS take your pick, when you're done you eject the CD and it's gone.

The only thing missing is iTunes and MobileMe, which won't work without Windows or OSX and here I am back to the main reason I bought my MacBook "netbook", I just couldn't be bothered fixing Windows again on my old Linux/XP PC.

Been there done that. It took some nonsensicle code typed into a terminal window to get my soundcard working. None of my games work on it, no Media Centre, no iTunes, no apparent way to install programs. I'm a geek, and if I couldn't do it, there'd be little chance for anyone else but the ultra geek.
post #107 of 128
OK, netbook prices as a baseline arent gonna skyrocket, there is a version of 7 for net books called windows 7 starter that will be essentially the same price as XP. MS WANTS XP TO DIE. XP is old at this point, it saw its final service pack nearly 2 years ago. Furthermore, Windows 7 is such a better product technilogically that it is a great value on a netbook, even if a netbook is $40 more...for christssake, you are getting a laptop computer for about the price of a fucking GAME BOY!!!!

The fact that a fully featured wireless enabled computer that can fit in a small napsack and weighs in under 3LB can be had for about $250 is amazing when you look at what $250 and a 3 LB weight limit could have bought not too long ago: at launch the Gameboy cost $179 according to Wikipedia, and that was in 1991, that would be about $270 in today's money.

and oh yea, fuck linux on netbooks...every linux based netbook buyer that I know except for one engineer who specifily wanted linux, ended up buying or bootlegging a copy of Windows so they could use the device in the real world.
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
Reply
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
Reply
post #108 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

MS/PC manufacturers (Dell, HP, etc.) find themselves in a very common business situation-diminishing profit margins where they all end up chasing the bottom. My father used to be in the milk business in the '70's and SealTest Food's (owned by Kraft) profit margin was called an "Eagle." In other words, .001%! All they were doing was wearing out the plants and trucks. They would actually make more money "not producing" milk!

Which reminds me of the old joke of the guy selling his product below cost. He figured volume sales would make up for what he lost in profit.

There's probably a better way of telling the joke. I just can't remember it exactly.
ADS
Reply
ADS
Reply
post #109 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

OS X runs really well on them, lot of people buy netbooks specifically to install OS X. Netbooks are a common Mac platform, even if Apple doesn't make one.

How do you do install OS X on a non-Mac netbook? I'm confused. I thought you needed a Mac to install OS X on. I'm not dissing you. I want to try that myself. Which netbook(s) will that work on?
ADS
Reply
ADS
Reply
post #110 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

How do you do install OS X on a non-Mac netbook? I'm confused. I thought you needed a Mac to install OS X on. I'm not dissing you. I want to try that myself. Which netbook(s) will that work on?

I've not personally seen a netbook running OS X, but it is being done. There are certain netbooks that are pretty popular for that, for example, there are step-by-step instructions on how to make it work on a Dell Mini 9. It's outside the scope of this forum, I suggest using Google to find any more information than that.
post #111 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I've not personally seen a netbook running OS X, but it is being done. There are certain netbooks that are pretty popular for that, for example, there are step-by-step instructions on how to make it work on a Dell Mini 9. It's outside the scope of this forum, I suggest using Google to find any more information than that.

Thanx. I used Google as you suggested. New vistas (pardon the pun) opened.
ADS
Reply
ADS
Reply
post #112 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Thanx. I used Google as you suggested. New vistas (pardon the pun) opened.

Sure. I didn't think it appropriate to give much more info than that given the forum rules.
post #113 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamondgeeza View Post

keynote is far superior to powerpoint. The last 9 months of being forced to use windows only at work has also made me think word is not so great either...

It's not great, & not only that but If you don't care for Numbers you can use OpenOffice, which is a more powerful application for working with numbers & data anyway.

I will say though, numbers makes building presentations from a spreadsheet very nice & easy, just has a horrible set of templates.
post #114 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think that's the real problem with the article and its headline. Microsoft doesn't set the price of a computer that I've heard. The referenced BusinessWeek article isn't any better. It's either poor wording or poor reasoning on the part of the articles here and at BusinessWeek.

I don't know what MS charges computer manufacturers for a bundled OS. Certainly it's less than they charge at retail. To a computer manufacturer the cost of an OS is just like any other component. As the price of computers comes down, the manufacturers work hard to get all their component costs down. MS must feel the pressure. If MS charges $100 for an OS on a computer that sells for $1,500, that's 6.7% of the selling price. On a $500 computer it's 20% of the selling price. Can't happen. MS wants computer selling prices raised to take the pressure off their pricing.

Long term the profitability of OS's sold to OEM's has got to drop. The OS manufacturing cost is nil so they can't cut their manufacturing costs, only the marketing, research and sales costs.
post #115 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Netbooks aren't really all that cheap when you consider what you get. I just bought my daughter a 15.6" Toshiba laptop with 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo, DVD burner, 2 GB, 240 GB and discrete graphics for $379. Why in the world would I want to pay $300 for a crappy 10% netbook with atom processor and no optical drive?

http://www.toshibadirect.com/td/b2c/...to?poid=445850
y.

is this what your kid got ??

its 553 $
did you get a refub or something ???Any way your price is wrong

Maybe you ..

Laptop Summary
Specifications\t customized
Intel® Core 2 Duo processor T6500 (2.1GHz, 2MB L2 Cache, 800MHz FSB)
Genuine Windows Vista® Home Premium 32-Bit
15.6" Diagonal Widescreen HD (1366x768) TruBrite® display
Black
Microsoft® Office Ready with Microsoft Office Professional 2007 60-day Trial Edition
2048MB PC6400 DDR2 800MHz SDRAM (2048MBx1)
250GB HDD (5400rpm, Serial-ATA)
DVD SuperMulti (+/-R double layer) drive
Lithium Ion battery (6-Cell, 4000mAh)
1 Year Standard Limited Warranty
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #116 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

How do you do install OS X on a non-Mac netbook? I'm confused. I thought you needed a Mac to install OS X on. I'm not dissing you. I want to try that myself. Which netbook(s) will that work on?

Only theives do this shitty move .
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #117 of 128
For many of us, price is not the main consideration when buying a netbook. Size, weight and cool operation were what sold me. My netbook will fit almost anywhere, weighs less than three pounds and never heats up my lap like MOST regular laptops will. I bought mine when it was a new model and gladly paid $500. (The price is now less than $400.)

So even when the cost goes up with Win7, netbooks will still seem worth it to me; especially when you compare them to Apple's closest offeringMB Air at $1499.
post #118 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

I'm not sure what's going on.

Windows being more expensive might increase the price of the machines they come loaded on.

So . . . Ballmer thinks that raising the price will help sell them? Does he think that a higher price tag will give the illusion of greater desirability? Will the other box makers magically start building Apple-like systems with unibody encolsures now? LOL this is interesting.

Can someone chime in on this, please.

I think new generation of netbooks will take on Windows 7, something in line of new HP 5101 netbooks.

That thing comes with 2GB of RAM, 7200RPM or SSD HDD, aluminium and magnesium allow casing, good battery life... and is a bit more expensive than your usual netbooks, though still perfectly affordable.

Right now it comes with Vista Business but with free upgrade to W7 Pro offer.

Entry level netbooks will likely remain on Linux, XP Home or W7 Basic.
post #119 of 128
lol true however keynote is very common at conferences in my field
post #120 of 128
I don't see why Apple needs an excuse to keep it's products priced high. They certainly didn't need an excuse so far with the pricing of any of their products. It doesn't matter to Apple if Netbook prices go up due to licensing of Windows 7. You will be redefining the term Netbook if the machine can run Windows 7.
Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
Reply
Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Microsoft plans to use Windows 7 to raise netbook prices