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Yahoo issues, retracts complaint about Apple's App Store

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Soon after the product manager for Yahoo's Messenger program for iPhone posted a complaint about Apple, the official company blog retracted the post and chalked it up to a misunderstanding.

"My bad," Sarah Bacon began her corrected post, "I was mistaken."

Originally, the product manager had criticized the iPhone maker in a post entitled "And so we wait...on Apple." In it, Bacon said that the iPhone App Store approval process was "somewhat unpredictable," and she blamed Apple for the delay of the latest update to Yahoo Messenger.

While she originally said the application had been submitted to Apple for approval weeks ago, that changed in the retraction soon posted on the Yahoo Messenger Blog.

"Turns out I didn't have the latest information about our Yahoo! Messenger for iPhone app, which is awaiting approval and release by Apple," she said, adding that the company withdrew its previous submission of the program to make changes.

She continued: "So the newly submitted Yahoo! Messenger for iPhone app has been with Apple for less than a week, and is well within the timeframe for their approval process."

Yahoo now expects Apple to approve their update to its Messenger application very soon, and Bacon admitted she jumped the gun in criticizing the iPhone maker. In recent weeks, Apple's approval process for the App Store has come under fire in the media, prompting company executive Phil Schiller to personally fight back.
post #2 of 42
In a related story, Yahoo has announced the reassignment of their former Yahoo product manager to their new remote office located in a suburb of Nome, AK.
post #3 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactoid View Post

In a related story, Yahoo has announced the reassignment of their former Yahoo product manager to their new remote office located in a suburb of Nome, AK.

Can you imagine how she would have reacted if they had actually {gasp} asked her to change something about the app?
Pity the agnostic dyslectic. They spend all their time contemplating the existence of dog.
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Pity the agnostic dyslectic. They spend all their time contemplating the existence of dog.
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post #4 of 42
a complaint about how long it takes apple to approve something from a company who takes forever to release Yahoo IM feature on the mac long after the feature existed on their non Mac application.

So when they are in a hurry apple has to jump and when they drag their feet releasing features for the rest of us they could care less.

I think apple should send them a letter saying when you start stepping up your efforts to support our product then maybe we will release your apps on the iphone a little faster.
post #5 of 42
Can you say, "Oops!"
post #6 of 42
"My bad."
post #7 of 42
You guys should read the comments on the blog post. Quite funny.

Also, they appear to have deleted comments from the entry before they edited the post.

I hope one day they will do something about Yahoo! Messenger for Mac. Do it right or just let it die. Maybe they could just kill it and use the developers to work on Adium to make it fully functional with all Yahoo! services. That would be great. Think of it: Having Adium work perfectly with Yahoo! and maybe downloading a small Adium Xtra for SMS and whatever premium features Yahoo! has.
post #8 of 42
Hahahahahaha.......fools.
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbehunin View Post

Can you say, "Oops!"

Well, I wouldn't throw away all that hard work on the blog post...

IMHO the person should hang on to it since it'll come in handy eventually.. Lets face it Apple app store approval process is not exactly a work of art... they have usability to consider, mature content entanglements at every turn and finally the CEO of AT&T has to be in a good mood or the app gets the axe...

Okay so I've gone a little beyond the truth, but not as far as you'd think... \

I mean these lame excuses like the Application was rejected since it duplicates the functionality already present in the iPhone? What are they smokin!?! That excuse could disqualify 99% of the apps on the app store if they felt like it. They don't, and they wouldn't, but the great thing about a nebulous excuse like that is they can use it whenever and however it suites them.

It's tantamount to cops giving out speeding tickets in a town without any speed limit signs.

Q: How was I speeding officer? This town has no speed limit signs anywhere!
A: Simple, you were speeding because I said you were speeding!

Dave
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"My bad," Sarah Bacon began her corrected post, "I was mistaken."

"Turns out I didn't have the latest information about our Yahoo! Messenger for iPhone app" adding that the company withdrew its previous submission of the program to make changes.

She is not alone.
post #11 of 42
It's apple's ballpark. They make and break the rules. Leave them alone.
You think 20 odd million people are going to throw their iPhones away because a handfull of developers threaten to go to the Zune-phone!?!
Blog releases like this are just link bait to advertise vapourware. If I were Apple I would announce and enforce a minimum 2 month ban on release post-approval to developers who publicly criticize their process.
That'll keep the interwebs focussed on real issues... like how many cameras the new iTablet is going to have!
post #12 of 42
It is typical of women to accuse first and say "I am sorry later".

It's like your girlfriend accusing you of cheating, before asking where you were.

Why do all these companies feel like Apple owe them something? Apple is not a public utility company. And iPhone is not a life necessity like water or electricity. Get your high horses and stop complaining.
post #13 of 42
This is what happens when people start piling on. All developers start to get a chip on their shoulder and feel like they have been wronged even before anything bad happens to them. They start to expect Apple to screw them over somehow. Then, at the least provocation, they point the finger and blame Apple for a none existent problem. The evil Apple empire is just the latest meme.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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post #14 of 42
Actually, the store does have problems. There are so many apps being submitted that it's difficult to know what all those reviewers are doing. This is too dependent on some reviewer deciding on their own that an app should be rejected, or not rejected.

Thats one reason why some of those rejections get reversed.

Apple must simplify their rules so that they can't be interpreted differently by different people reviewing apps, and also so that developers reading them know EXACTLY what they can, and can't do.

That doesn't seem to be the situation now, and I wonder if that's intentional on Apple's part.
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

It is typical of women to accuse first and say "I am sorry later".

Now that is Fark-like comment.
post #16 of 42
Meanwhile, Yahoo have been trying to figure out how they lost a near monopoly on search to an unknown startup...

Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
15" Matte MacBook Pro: 2.66Ghz i7, 8GB RAM, GT330m 512MB, 512GB SSD

iPhone 5 Black 32GB

iPad 3rd Generation, 32GB

Mac Mini Core2Duo 2.26ghz,...

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post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Say that that was a joke, please. Or delete it. We really don't need those types of remarks here, even if some of our readers and posters weren't women, which they are.

you are a moderator. there should be a delete button in front of you.
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by emulator View Post

you are a moderator. there should be a delete button in front of you.

Thank you for explaining. I was wondering how I've deleted other posts in the past.

I prefer to give people a chance to rectify their errors, as long as it isn't going too far off, otherwise, I will delete it. I still will if a response is forthcoming soon enough.
post #19 of 42
It's fun to watch how things can get off-topic really fast
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmoeser View Post

It's apple's ballpark. They make and break the rules. Leave them alone.
You think 20 odd million people are going to throw their iPhones away because a handfull of developers threaten to go to the Zune-phone!?!
Blog releases like this are just link bait to advertise vapourware. If I were Apple I would announce and enforce a minimum 2 month ban on release post-approval to developers who publicly criticize their process.
That'll keep the interwebs focussed on real issues... like how many cameras the new iTablet is going to have!


I realize that, developers realize that and future buyers realize that...

__NOT__ a problem!

What I'm having a hard time understanding is how you seem as giddy as a schoolgirl with Apple having such total control over what Apps you can and cant run on your computer.... err.. iPhone... err... computer?

In this day and age I'm having a harder and harder time discerning the difference.

Dave
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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post #21 of 42
a project manager who doesnt know the exact current status of a project s/he is managing should be fired.
or, it is possible that Yahoo is thinking ahead to put some pressure on apple to make sure it does get approved.
post #22 of 42
ya-who?

search engine, come portal, come various sub par services, come ms target (boy ms does know how to pick targets...), come nothing.

btw, off topic, really classy response by the mods here unlike other places, no names. Gives the poster a chance to rectify his behaviour and if he or she don't do so then intervenes. All internet forums could use such light handed, classy interventions.
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Thank you for explaining. I was wondering how I've deleted other posts in the past.

I prefer to give people a chance to rectify their errors, as long as it isn't going too far off, otherwise, I will delete it. I still will if a response is forthcoming soon enough.

B.S., what you are doing is creating drama by commenting on the poor taste of the post, rather than simply deleting it. There are stupid, incendiary comments posted on this site on a regular basis.
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Actually, the store does have problems. There are so many apps being submitted that it's difficult to know what all those reviewers are doing. This is too dependent on some reviewer deciding on their own that an app should be rejected, or not rejected.

Thats one reason why some of those rejections get reversed.

Apple must simplify their rules so that they can't be interpreted differently by different people reviewing apps, and also so that developers reading them know EXACTLY what they can, and can't do.

That doesn't seem to be the situation now, and I wonder if that's intentional on Apple's part.

Based on what we have seen in the last few days, most of the issues were caused by the developer.

And if they had read their SDK agreement they would have realized that the guidelines are really quite clear.

It seems apparent to me, having read and reread the guidelines each time I download an update, that most of the developers who are being rejected or their submission is being delayed aren't doing likewise.

It also seems that since Apple opened up the SDK and loosened up on NDA, some are not bothering to read it at all.

Having attended an Apple iPhone developer program, I can attest to Apple's commitment to uncompromising support in assisting developers in getting their apps to market.
post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

This is what happens when people start piling on. All developers start to get a chip on their shoulder and feel like they have been wronged even before anything bad happens to them. They start to expect Apple to screw them over somehow. Then, at the least provocation, they point the finger and blame Apple for a none existent problem. The evil Apple empire is just the latest meme.

This was my first thought also. The reason this person over-reacted, is because the tech media has created an aura of blame around Apple, the app store, and the approval process.

By constantly publishing these "irate developer gets rejected" stories and passing them around, the perception is created that there is a systemic problem when if you look closer, there really isn't. Then the first time anything goes wrong, people leap to conclusions based on everything they've been reading over the last little while.

It's no different from blaming things on "women" (as someone has done in this very thread), based on an erroneous perception of women "typically" being a certain way.

Virtually every developer rejection story has turned out to have a rational explanation at the end of the day. If the tech press is not going to give as much coverage to the resolution of these problems as they are to advertising the problems itself, then they shouldn't be covering the story at all.

It would also be nice to get a historical article once in a while, that goes through the recent record and corrects or clarifies things for those people who have short memories and even shorter tempers.
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
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In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
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post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boogerman2000 View Post

B.S., what you are doing is creating drama by commenting on the poor taste of the post, rather than simply deleting it. There are stupid, incendiary comments posted on this site on a regular basis.

I am not a moderator here, but I've moderated other forums and I can tell that you've obviously never moderated a forum yourself.

There is a value to getting the OP to recognise that they posted something in bad taste. There is also a value in highlighting exactly the kind of thing that *is* in bad taste for the rest of the subscribers.

Censorship, in the way of direct deletion of comments is always the *last* step to take, and it's better to not censor at all than it is to just randomly delete stuff that you don't like. The whole purpose of a forum is debate.

You don't moderate children's behaviour by smacking them in the back of the head out of nowhere without giving them some guidelines and at least one warning first.
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

You don't moderate children's behaviour by smacking them in the back of the head out of nowhere without giving them some guidelines and at least one warning first.

The guidelines are well posted.

A warning was given.

The offending blog is still there.

Enough time. Enough said. Enough already.

Just delete it.
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boogerman2000 View Post

B.S., what you are doing is creating drama by commenting on the poor taste of the post, rather than simply deleting it. There are stupid, incendiary comments posted on this site on a regular basis.

I'm not trying to create any drama, as you have just done.

But I don't see every post on every thread, and so can't comment on them.

I just got back, and as it hasn't been changed, I am going to delete it as I sad I would after some time.
post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Based on what we have seen in the last few days, most of the issues were caused by the developer.

And if they had read their SDK agreement they would have realized that the guidelines are really quite clear.

It seems apparent to me, having read and reread the guidelines each time I download an update, that most of the developers who are being rejected or their submission is being delayed aren't doing likewise.

It also seems that since Apple opened up the SDK and loosened up on NDA, some are not bothering to read it at all.

Having attended an Apple iPhone developer program, I can attest to Apple's commitment to uncompromising support in assisting developers in getting their apps to market.

I've read their guidelines as well, and they leave Apple a wide degree of discretion. Apple doesn't always apply the guidelines equally either. There have always been questions as to why Apple allows some apps, but then rejects others that are less objectionable than the ones they have allowed.

Then we have seen apps in the store for weeks or even a couple of months which are abruptly removed.

Obviously, the guidelines are moving.

But then, even worse, is why Apple can have apps that link to pornography, but third party developers can't, or must have them listed as adult, or why one single word can get an app removed, even though that word is in other apps, such as the dictionary ruckus

I don't see the phone as being any different than the computer. If Apple decides to make all apps go through them, then they have to decide that they will allow anything that isn't malicious. This variable censorship may go down well with the Disney crowd, but it gets everyone else upset, as it should.

This makes no sense to me.

We should also know why some apps that may compete with AT%T services are not allowed, or are removed. Is this a contractual matter? If so, we should know where the determining factor is.
post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

The guidelines are well posted.

A warning was given.

The offending blog is still there.

Enough time. Enough said. Enough already.

Just delete it.

I did. I'm allowed to have dinner with my wife, yes?
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I'm not trying to create any drama, as you have just done.

But I don't see every post on every thread, and so can't comment on them.

I just got back, and as it hasn't been changed, I am going to delete it as I sad I would after some time.

Talk to the hand both of you.

Damn this world for some progress we now have our tension levels so wound tight we could shoot diamonds out our rears.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I did. I'm allowed to have dinner with my wife, yes?

Absolutely. Thank you
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I've read their guidelines as well, and they leave Apple a wide degree of discretion. Apple doesn't always apply the guidelines equally either. There have always been questions as to why Apple allows some apps, but then rejects others that are less objectionable than the ones they have allowed.

Then we have seen apps in the store for weeks or even a couple of months which are abruptly removed.

Obviously, the guidelines are moving.

But then, even worse, is why Apple can have apps that link to pornography, but third party developers can't, or must have them listed as adult, or why one single word can get an app removed, even though that word is in other apps, such as the dictionary ruckus

I don't see the phone as being any different than the computer. If Apple decides to make all apps go through them, then they have to decide that they will allow anything that isn't malicious. This variable censorship may go down well with the Disney crowd, but it gets everyone else upset, as it should.

This makes no sense to me.

We should also know why some apps that may compete with AT%T services are not allowed, or are removed. Is this a contractual matter? If so, we should know where the determining factor is.

Mel, the guidelines are not moving. There has been a couple of major changes with the increased functionality of 3.0, but the overall iPhone app SDK guidelines are quite consistent with Apples corporate policies from the beginning.

As many are now witnessing, most and that is nearly all of the so-called disenchanted developers have admitted that much of the issues were their undoing. "Didn't understand" is like going to court and telling the judge that you weren't familiar with the crime that you were charge for. It just doesn't fly. This is especially true, considering that the tens of thousands of other developers that submitted over 65,000 apps and were approved well understood what the rules were.

We have had two WWDC conferences and a number of iPhone Developer Events in the US, Canada and overseas as well. Having met a few of the 15,000 or so attendees, I can't recall hearing of any who were upset with the process.

Again, 65 thousand apps, over a 100 million downloads by millions of users vs a handful of rejected/delayed apps, by a like number of developers and the constant anti-Apple rhetoric by the same group of trolling misfits that plague these forums, does not gets everyone else upset.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Talk to the hand both of you.

Damn this world for some progress we now have our tension levels so wound tight we could shoot diamonds out our rears.

I didn't see the tensions as being so high. If I didn't write anything at all, a couple would have written some remarks about the post, as they did, and likely no one would have thought anything more about it.

If the post was more direct, I would have deleted it right away. You've surely seen how I edit, and sometimes delete posts when excessively foal language is used. I'm actually more sensitive about these things than some other mods. But I have to make a decision, as I don't like to censor.

If we censored everything that seems slightly off base, every thread would have at least a half dozen deletions. I don't think anyone wants that.

People have to be allowed to let off some steam, but some things should not be said. In that case, as long as it isn't actually well out of bounds, I like to give people a chance to fix it themselves, and they usually do.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


Again, 65 thousand apps, over a 100 million downloads by millions of users vs a handful of rejected/delayed apps, by a like number of developers and the constant anti-Apple rhetoric by the same group of trolling misfits that plague these forums, does not gets everyone else upset.

This is the problem with the Mac community today. Any criticism of Apple, and you are a 'trolling misfit' and a plague on these forums.

Apple is not perfect. Criticism of them, their products and their policies has result in them improving. There absolutely are anti-Apple haters trolling. It is too bad that some of the 'righteous defenders' of Apple's honour are not able to tell the difference. Criticize The Company and you are a heretic, a hater, a troll or a plague.

In the old days, being called a Mac Zealot was humorous...sort of a badge of honour for those 'in the club'. These days it really has degraded into a pseudo-religion, with the new zealots being frighteningly similar to any other religious nut.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Mel, the guidelines are not moving. There has been a couple of major changes with the increased functionality of 3.0, but the overall iPhone app SDK guidelines are quite consistent with Apples corporate policies from the beginning.

As many are now witnessing, most and that is nearly all of the so-called disenchanted developers have admitted that much of the issues were their undoing. "Didn't understand" is like going to court and telling the judge that you weren't familiar with the crime that you were charge for. It just doesn't fly. This is especially true, considering that the tens of thousands of other developers that submitted over 65,000 apps and were approved well understood what the rules were.

We have had two WWDC conferences and a number of iPhone Developer Events in the US, Canada and overseas as well. Having met a few of the 15,000 or so attendees, I can't recall hearing of any who were upset with the process.

Again, 65 thousand apps, over a 100 million downloads by millions of users vs a handful of rejected/delayed apps, by a like number of developers and the constant anti-Apple rhetoric by the same group of trolling misfits that plague these forums, does not gets everyone else upset.

When I said the guidelines are moving, I mean that the interpretation of them is moving, and so they are. I've kept up with this problem, and I can see it.

Perhaps I shouldn't have said that "everyone" is upset about this, but a large number of people are, both developers AND users.

Actually, politics is always involved here. If a developer would like to remain within the good graces of Apple, I would expect them to try and be conciliatory. Well, yeah!

Many of us remember when Apple dropped ATI as a supplier at the last minute, which cost ATI big bucks, and cost Apple too, but ATI made a little mistake of mentioning a product.

ATI was a big company, and the biggest board supplier to Apple.

Do you think that some small developer would want to buck Apple? Even Google? I don't. They would live in fear of ever having another app approved. I'm not saying that Apple (or Steve) would do that, but as they say; "Your reputation preceeds you", and Apple's got a big reputation there.

Oh, and I'm not a troll. While my daughter sometimes thinks of me as being a misfit, I don't really think I am, just a bit misshapen, perhaps. But I do fit.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

This is the problem with the Mac community today. Any criticism of Apple, and you are a 'trolling misfit' and a plague on these forums.

Apple is not perfect. Criticism of them, their products and their policies has result in them improving. There absolutely are anti-Apple haters trolling. It is too bad that some of the 'righteous defenders' of Apple's honour are not able to tell the difference. Criticize The Company and you are a heretic, a hater, a troll or a plague.

In the old days, being called a Mac Zealot was humorous...sort of a badge of honour for those 'in the club'. These days it really has degraded into a pseudo-religion, with the new zealots being frighteningly similar to any other religious nut.

"But, you know what? Its a crock of sh-t!"*

*Mark Sigal. APPLE is EVIL, You're All Fanboys and other half-truths. http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/08/app...ll-fanboy.html
post #38 of 42
My app updates have consistently taken 7 days+- 1 day, until the 3GS launch in June, where they were delayed for over a month. It was back to normal, until recently, when they are taking slightly longer again. My point is, all iPhone developers know that approval time is inconsistent. Does Yahoo think that because they're a huge company they should be on some exclusive fast track?
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

It is typical of women to accuse first and say "I am sorry later".

It's like your girlfriend accusing you of cheating, before asking where you were.

Still working on issues surrounding irrational fears of castration, I see.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

It is typical of women to accuse first and say "I am sorry later".

It's like your girlfriend accusing you of cheating, before asking where you were.

Why do all these companies feel like Apple owe them something? Apple is not a public utility company. And iPhone is not a life necessity like water or electricity. Get your high horses and stop complaining.

cut the sexism remarks, does not matter if it was a man or woman, who made the remarks. I love APPLE, but there approval process does suck at times and if people do not complain in the appropriate manner, nothing will get improved.

Unfortunate this Yahoo employee jumped the gun.
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