or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › What type of glue/epoxy to use
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What type of glue/epoxy to use

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I broke my damn sony headphones and was wondering what you guyswould sugest glueing them together with. They are MDV-R (500s i think) headphones made out of that cheap sony plastic (damn it its weak).
I bought some 5 minute epoxy,but that stuff doesnt seem to hold (left them for a day, put them on my head and they broke again). The bac kfo the box said that superglue would be better but...

Maybe ill just go buy some Koss porta pros (my father grabbed a pair a year or two back and i was amazed by the sound quallity).

So what glue do you guys think would work best, and/or what durrable high quallity headphones would you sugest (preferably ones that let more sound into you hear than out, thats the problem I have with the Koss ones).
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
post #2 of 10
Cyanoacrylate (most are labeled "superglue"0 should work well. You might also try a slow-curing plastic cement... if the broken pieces line up properly and you can clamp them that should be very strong. HTH
post #3 of 10
[quote]
What type of glue/epoxy to use ?
<hr></blockquote>

I've tried them all,but I think the ploymethacrylics are too heavy a trip man.
post #4 of 10
Try Epoxy that cures in thirty minutes.

You could also try a thick cynanocrylate glue (Krazy glue is pretty thin).

Actually, just buy a new pair of headphones....
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I've tried them all,but I think the ploymethacrylics are too heavy a trip man.
I cant remember what movie this is from but...
"Hey, you ever shot glue?"
"You mean sniffed it"
"no"

As for buying new ones, I really dont have the $60 for them at the moment
I think Ill stick with the superglue idea for now, thanks.
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
post #6 of 10
Superglue does work extremely well,I was just joking about the sniffing,actually Superglue hardens by coming into contact with oxygen,it doesn't give off any fumes.
post #7 of 10
Neoprene glue is the best for this kind of reparation;
post #8 of 10
After one side broke off, I retrofitted this baby with a wire coat hanger. <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />

They have a snug fit and are actually still very comfortable. You'd never know it was broken without looking at it.

post #9 of 10
i've always been a fan of electrical tape/superglue combinations to fix cheap headphones...
post #10 of 10
The most common type of superglue is cyanoacrylate. This tends of bond to just about everything. However, I've found that it has no adhesivity on some surfaces such as ceramics (I would bet glass as well but I've never had broken glass to fix). For times when cyanoacrylate doesnt work I found some other chemical which is N-N Ethyl Methyl Ketone (I think). It reminds me of either vanilla or tapioka, but I can't remember since I havent gotten it out in about 6 months. Plastic may not respond well to cyanacrylate based superglue as the chemical reacts primarily with water, which I guess is why it bonds so well with organic matter.

Personnally, however, I recommend you take this oppurtunity to ditch the evil evil Sony headphones and buy yourself some nice Senns or Grados. Unless, of course, you're one of those fools who equates booming bass with quality sound.

[ 12-07-2001: Message edited by: Lucky ]</p>
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › What type of glue/epoxy to use