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Nokia hopes to fight off Apple iPhone gains with Linux - Page 2

post #41 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

Competitors still do not understand why Apple is succeeding among consumers. Apple is the only company in the industry who builds a mobile OS that people actually want. Competitors understand features and eye candy, but not total user experience. They do not understand that software is not just something slapped onto hardware after the fact. Software and the way it works must be designed in lock-step with the hardware from the beginning for total integration.

Look at the companies that are actually making an OS; BB, Android, Palm, WM. The only OS that people actually want is mobile OSX. All others are just a disparate collection of features and eye-candy.

I think competition understands very well why Apple is succeeding, the challenge is always how to make this work in your own organization. As someone who worked for Symbian and was acquired by Nokia, this is the challange we face- and I have to say right now in the org it is pretty exciting
post #42 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

The N900 is one thing but what about this?

Yuck. The name does not cound nice too.. I really am beginning to suspect that Nokia could have something under it's sleeves about integration between their phones and now, laptops..
post #43 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin.mcintyre View Post

I think competition understands very well why Apple is succeeding, the challenge is always how to make this work in your own organization. As someone who worked for Symbian and was acquired by Nokia, this is the challange we face- and I have to say right now in the org it is pretty exciting

+1. Competitiors make Apple work more on its feet and it's better for us, consumers!
post #44 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

It's a bit too little and a bit too late. Nokia will remain a player but won't command the lead they once had. RIM and Apple will continue to take their marketshare.

Hi MacTel, and interesting comment, but a little preatture It is interesting to see how Nokia is written off so quickly given the massive market share, and it ability to reinvent itself (in 1990 Nokia's primary business was rubber tires and boots).

- 472 million phones shipped last year
- 1.1 billion users worldwide
- Nokia sells more phones than the next three or four competitors combined (Quote from Tero Ojanperä)
- Q2 44% share of the smartphone market (Apple 14% and RIM 21%)


I worked for Symbian until being acquired by Nokia, and it is interesting to see the buzz in the organisation right now. It is very true we have some tough and very different competition (to the more established phone OEMs), and we also have our own challenges to overcome, but that is what makes life exciting

Cheers,

Kevin
post #45 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post

iPhone debuted in 2007.

They've changed it.
post #46 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Nokia has been selling their tablets for four years, is that what you mean by getting an early lead?

I doubt if many people take the current incarnation of Nokia's tablets seriously. I didn't even know Nokia made those. If and when Apple launches a device in between an iPhone and a Macbook, it will eat into the Netbook market as well as the tablet market. Selling a brand new net book with Windows 7 just seems rather "rush to market and get some traction" for me.

The bigger issue is that all of their different platforms don't seem to be getting the kind of attention they deserve. Software defects have always been a headache with the fancier Nokia phones.
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post #47 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

I agree sort of.

The few times I've seen the Pre I've actually been fairly impressed with the OS, and I like the hardware too. They seem to be the competition for Apple now - I agree that the others are not upto much.

sort of ???\\
whats in a name ? 
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whats in a name ? 
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post #48 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post

They've changed it.

it was that jail break debut on 06
whats in a name ? 
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whats in a name ? 
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post #49 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

It's a bit too little and a bit too late. Nokia will remain a player but won't command the lead they once had. RIM and Apple will continue to take their marketshare.


cell phones aren't like computers. contracts expire every two years and the apps are cheap enough that i won't care to lose them. and unlike the 1990's when computers cost $3000 plus the software there is a much lower barrier to swtich to another cell phone

I checked and the specs on the new Nokia are better than the iphone, didn't see the software yet. don't know about usability, but the videos on boygeniusreport look nice and at least the graphics seem that the iphone interface looks ancient compared to this
post #50 of 84
That 44% seems like an impressive number until you look at Nokia's profit per handset, now how much of that 44% is made up of cheaper phones eg 6120, 5230 then how many of those phones are actually being used as smartphones given things like the iPhone's dominance of mobile web browsing, currently it's the number one camera uploading to Flickr and other evidence,

With so many Nokia smartphones around, don't you think it's disappointing that the uptake of Nokia's free email service is only just above a million after 8 months which is less than 0.5% of Nokia smartphones sold over that period.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin.mcintyre View Post

- Q2 44% share of the smartphone market (Apple 14% and RIM 21%)
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #51 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

cell phones aren't like computers. contracts expire every two years and the apps are cheap enough that i won't care to lose them. and unlike the 1990's when computers cost $3000 plus the software there is a much lower barrier to swtich to another cell phone.

Those are good points, but there are also points to be made about the software on the iPhone. Besides iPhone OS X being more advanced and more intuitive than other devices which is why it doesnt have to beat other vendors on a spec sheet in order to be the best option for many, there is also the SDK which is by far the best mobile development platform. In a short time of creating a phone and having an SDK they have blown away every other mobile development platform by making it simple to use while offering excellent access to frameworks and foundations. Dont say Android has this, because they simply dont. The only faulty area for both the consumer and developer is the inconsistency in which Apple handles their App Store.

Quote:
I checked and the specs on the new Nokia are better than the iphone, didn't see the software yet. don't know about usability, but the videos on boygeniusreport look nice and at least the graphics seem that the iphone interface looks ancient compared to this

Which device is it, the N900, because the N97, which was released right around the same time as the 3GS and Pre have a lot of hardware from the original and 3G iPhone while still costing the same retail as the 3GS and Pre. Its quite sad!


Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

That 44% seems like an impressive number until you look at Nokia's profit per handset, now how much of that 44% is made up of cheaper phones eg 6120, 5230 then how many of those phones are actually being used as smartphones given things like the iPhone's dominance of mobile web browsing, currently it's the number one camera uploading to Flickr and other evidence,

With so many Nokia smartphones around, don't you think it's disappointing that the uptake of Nokia's free email service is only just above a million after 8 months which is less than 0.5% of Nokia smartphones sold over that period.

Relevant perspectives are not Nokias friend.
post #52 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

That 44% seems like an impressive number until you look at Nokia's profit per handset, now how much of that 44% is made up of cheaper phones eg 6120, 5230 then how many of those phones are actually being used as smartphones given things like the iPhone's dominance of mobile web browsing, currently it's the number one camera uploading to Flickr and other evidence,

With so many Nokia smartphones around, don't you think it's disappointing that the uptake of Nokia's free email service is only just above a million after 8 months which is less than 0.5% of Nokia smartphones sold over that period.

It's not disappointing at all since Nokia hasn't really even pushed its services yet to handsets. Of course the uptake could be bigger but you have to realize that Nokia has always done things differently than Apple. And I'm pretty sure they will continue the same trend. And to be honest you have to remember that Flickr counts all iPhones as one, that is not what they do with Canon etc. No idea what they do with other mobiles.

The device this thread is about is btw out.
Links:
http://maemo.nokia.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_uRmoy8Fs & http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RP5R-5NX1BE & http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhTtsZATwBQ
post #53 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Those are good points, but there are also points to be made about the software on the iPhone. Besides iPhone OS X being more advanced and more intuitive than other devices which is why it doesn’t have to beat other vendors on a spec sheet in order to be the best option for many, there is also the SDK which is by far the best mobile development platform. In a short time of creating a phone and having an SDK they have blown away every other mobile development platform by making it simple to use while offering excellent access to frameworks and foundations. Don’t say Android has this, because they simply don’t. The only faulty area for both the consumer and developer is the inconsistency in which Apple handles their App Store.


Which device is it, the N900, because the N97, which was released right around the same time as the 3GS and Pre have a lot of hardware from the original and 3G iPhone while still costing the same retail as the 3GS and Pre. It’s quite sad!



Relevant perspectives are not Nokia’s friend.

the N900

32GB storage and support for 16GB removable SD cards and a 5 mega pixel camera with a better lens. same CPU as the iphone and Pre. I've read Android's biggest problem is that it's Java based and that means no good games since you can't hit the hardware directly

looks nice on paper, will have to see in the real world

Nokia has a pretty good history. back in 2000 they killed Motorola in the handset market by knowing who to market to
post #54 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

the N900

32GB storage and support for 16GB removable SD cards and a 5 mega pixel camera with a better lens. same CPU as the iphone and Pre. I've read Android's biggest problem is that it's Java based and that means no good games since you can't hit the hardware directly

looks nice on paper, will have to see in the real world

Nokia has a pretty good history. back in 2000 they killed Motorola in the handset market by knowing who to market to

If removable storage and a better than average camera in a phone is very important then Nokia will likely always be your choice and the iPhone will never be as those arent things Apple wants to do and due to certain engineering goals they simply cant do. Personally, those things have never appealed to me so Im pretty much in the iPhone corner, though I do hope Nokia can make a financial comeback soon.
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

This is almost a perfect description of the attitude and state of the Linux community in general though.

Each year brings a new uber-cool "flavour" of Linux which solves many of the problems last years flavour, by establishing more control and more rules over what gets into the distro or not. Then next year there's a new flavour, and those in control of last year's flavour have relinquished some of their control in hopes of getting the community to solve some of it's many problems while this year's version is arguing for more control at the same time.

Rinse, repeat ...

it's Linux! the never-ending, almost-there, coulda-been, shoulda-been king of OS's

mmm....

All the Woulda-Coulda-Shouldas
Layin' in the sun,
Talkin' 'bout the things
They woulda coulda shoulda done...
But those Woulda-Coulda-Shouldas
All ran away and hid
From one little Did.
-Shel Silverstein-

*
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #56 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

That 44% seems like an impressive number until you look at Nokia's profit per handset, now how much of that 44% is made up of cheaper phones eg 6120, 5230 then how many of those phones are actually being used as smartphones given things like the iPhone's dominance of mobile web browsing, currently it's the number one camera uploading to Flickr and other evidence,

With so many Nokia smartphones around, don't you think it's disappointing that the uptake of Nokia's free email service is only just above a million after 8 months which is less than 0.5% of Nokia smartphones sold over that period.

You raise good points but right now in the org it is pretty exciting


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post #57 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Also, just to be picky, Linux is "unix-like" but is not "based on Unix" or a Unix variant itself, but rather based on "Minix" which itself is a copy of some of Unix. Mac OS-X on the other hand, *is* Unix, (with a lot of GUI stuff bolted on). Granted, they are both a long way from the original thing that used to be called Unix, but to say Linux has the "same codebase" as Unix is misleading. The whole point of Linux is that it's not the same codebase as Unix.

You are utterly wrong here! Not only is Linux not derived from Minix but it *is* UNIX! I forget which company it was that payed for the UNIX certification. What you probably don't know is that UNIX has nothing to do with whether the underlying kernel is derived from original AT&T Unix kernels or not. Also, Linus Torvalds started out writing his system from scratch and originally used the very simple Minix file system. Linux is not and never was a modified Minix. Plus, the Linux kernel is about 2 orders of magnitude larger and supports a much larger feature set. Furthermore, what makes something UNIX is basically the system calls the operating system supports plus a set of libraries and utilities that the system includes and not how those system calls are implemented nor any ancestry of AT&T code!
post #58 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

...mostly just the GUI is different.

Methinks you understate this fact. The iPhoone GUI is completely different, very complex, and superior in many ways. And from a user's perspective the GUI *is* the OS.

Thompson
post #59 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Which device is it, the N900, because the N97, which was released right around the same time as the 3GS and Pre have a lot of hardware from the original and 3G iPhone while still costing the same retail as the 3GS and Pre. Its quite sad!

So it is okay for Apple to make an insane profit per device, but if someone else tries it, it is bad?
post #60 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

That 44% seems like an impressive number until you look at Nokia's profit per handset, now how much of that 44% is made up of cheaper phones eg 6120, 5230 then how many of those phones are actually being used as smartphones given things like the iPhone's dominance of mobile web browsing, currently it's the number one camera uploading to Flickr and other evidence,

As a consumer, I don't like corporations making such a huge profit of me.
post #61 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by talksense101 View Post

I doubt if many people take the current incarnation of Nokia's tablets seriously. I didn't even know Nokia made those. If and when Apple launches a device in between an iPhone and a Macbook, it will eat into the Netbook market as well as the tablet market. Selling a brand new net book with Windows 7 just seems rather "rush to market and get some traction" for me.

I could say the same thing about the iPhone, especially since it has been over a year since I have seen one in public.
post #62 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

With so many Nokia smartphones around, don't you think it's disappointing that the uptake of Nokia's free email service is only just above a million after 8 months which is less than 0.5% of Nokia smartphones sold over that period.

No, I don't think it is disapointing, there are plently of free email services around that are already supported on the phones
post #63 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

So it is okay for Apple to make an insane profit per device, but if someone else tries it, it is bad?

Don’t be an ass, I’m fine with Nokia trying to do so, but even Nokia fans realize that the N97 is inferior in every way. It’s only saving grace is that it’s OS is so weak compared to the iPhone and Pre that it doesn’t need modern hardware, but that doesn’t mean that Nokia is doing itself any favours for charging so much for the device.

That also doesn’t mean Nokia is making the sam profit as Apple is or even Palm for the respective devices. Apple has a simpler focus and tighter controls so it’s quite possible Apple can use better components while still turning a higher profit.

You should never begrudge a company for making money, and I’ve read your posts here, you either pooh pooh Apple for being profitable while looking for any chance to see if Apple’s profits dropped at all so you can scream “look, people aren’t buying because they charge too much!” As long as you have a choice to buy or not to buy there is no problem with a company’s profit, i just wish companies like Nokia would restructure with a better focus for the future before they loss the entire profitable part of the segment.
post #64 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

As a consumer, I don't like corporations making such a huge profit of me.

As a consumer you have a choice of what to buy, this is your power.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

No, I don't think it is disapointing, there are plently of free email services around that are already supported on the phones

Offering "push" and other services along the lines of Mobile Me, with shortcuts built into the phone and advertising with the phone packaging it's mainly been focussed on the E series, once again it points to Nokia padding the figures by selling smartphones which aren't being used as smartphones.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #65 of 84
Nokia have a commanding share in units sold.
And perhaps that has made them a little complacent.

The market has shifted from hardware to software and Nokia's response has been to wait and see what happens. They have waited too long, and this response is inadequate.

Symbian is too old, odd and fragile to compete with more modern phone OSs.

The move to Maemo is sensible. But should have happened years ago.

A Linux based OS is great. In many ways, Linux is no better or no worse than the Unix-based OS X.

But it isn't Unix that makes the iPhone attractive for users and developers. That's not the important part.

The iPhone has three legs on its stool.
OS X (which has an interface built by...)
Cocoa (which is auto-magically rendered by...)
Hardware acceleration.

These three components work together seamlessly to make the iPhone a very slick platform. When you build an app, you can build it from standard parts, run it in native code, and have all the heavy lifting done for you. All the interface is written. Everything makes use of the GPU without the programmer needing to write a single line of code.

If Maemo had the equivalent of this holy trinity , then Nokia would be able to say that they were competitive with the iPhone. They'd have a fighting chance. Despite being 2 years late to the party.

But Maemo does not.

Maemo is just the OS. Not the application UI framework. Not the free hardware acceleration. 3rd party developers would be a little better off than with Symbian. But not by much.

Worst still, Nokia themselves will be less able to create applications. Each app is going to cost them more. It will take longer to develop.

Trying to catch up is difficult.
But if are forced to proceed slower than the leader, it is impossible.

C.
post #66 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Aonce again it points to Nokia padding the figures by selling smartphones which aren't being used as smartphones.

It doesn't matter what they are being used for, they are a smart phone, and Nokia has sold them.

If you wanted to get into that argument, what about all the laptop manufactures that are selling more of them, but I bet most of them just sit on someones desk and are never used in a portable situation.
post #67 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Dont be an ass, Im fine with Nokia trying to do so, but even Nokia fans realize that the N97 is inferior in every way. Its only saving grace is that its OS is so weak compared to the iPhone and Pre that it doesnt need modern hardware, but that doesnt mean that Nokia is doing itself any favours for charging so much for the device.

99.9% of consumers won't care what is in the device hardware wise, they just want the functionality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

You should never begrudge a company for making money, and Ive read your posts here, you either pooh pooh Apple for being profitable while looking for any chance to see if Apples profits dropped at all so you can scream look, people arent buying because they charge too much! As long as you have a choice to buy or not to buy there is no problem with a companys profit, i just wish companies like Nokia would restructure with a better focus for the future before they loss the entire profitable part of the segment.

I don't 'pooh pooh' Apple for being profitable, I 'pooh pooh' the people on this site that seem excited by the large profit that Apple is making on the device.
post #68 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

99.9% of consumers won't care what is in the device hardware wise, they just want the functionality.

Which is why the iPhone is such a popular smartphone and why it has, on two fronts, taken the smartphone market segment from a place where only hardcore business users and sexless geeks were consumers and made it into the focus of the average consumer. All the smartphone vendors are benefiting from this in sales, even if they are losing some marketshare and higher-end customers to better devices with more functionality. And now the smartphone vendors are actually making their devices more functional by taking cues from Apple.

Note: functionality is not just simply having a feature that you jerk off to on a spec sheet. Its about a feature that us actually useful and functional. Web browsing on a smartphone is a prime example of this.

Quote:
I don't 'pooh pooh' Apple for being profitable, I 'pooh pooh' the people on this site that seem excited by the large profit that Apple is making on the device.

RiM makes more gross profit than Apple on their devices and yet their net profit is lower. This is what happens when you have devices that are more prone to breaking due to do cheap plastic and more moving parts, when you have a multitude of devices that are built for various regions and countries and carriers you reduce your net profit. You pooh pooh Apple for being more efficient and you come down on people that are happy to see Apple turn a profit which positively affects our stock holdings in the company. I also hold Amazon and RiM so I like when they do well too.
post #69 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Which is why the iPhone is such a popular smartphone and why it has, on two fronts, taken the smartphone market segment from a place where only hardcore business users and sexless geeks were consumers and made it into the focus of the average consumer. All the smartphone vendors are benefiting from this in sales, even if they are losing some marketshare and higher-end customers to better devices with more functionality. And now the smartphone vendors are actually making their devices more functional by taking cues from Apple.

Popular smart phone in the USA. Remember 50% of the sales are in the US which has 5% of the population, that doesn't make it popular.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Note: functionality is not just simply having a feature that you jerk off to on a spec sheet. Its about a feature that us actually useful and functional. Web browsing on a smartphone is a prime example of this.

You will have to expand on this statement a bit more, it doesn't say anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

RiM makes more gross profit than Apple on their devices and yet their net profit is lower. This is what happens when you have devices that are more prone to breaking due to do cheap plastic and more moving parts, when you have a multitude of devices that are built for various regions and countries and carriers you reduce your net profit. You pooh pooh Apple for being more efficient and you come down on people that are happy to see Apple turn a profit which positively affects our stock holdings in the company. I also hold Amazon and RiM so I like when they do well too.

I don't care how much money RIM makes, I don't own, and have no intention of purchasing a RIM device.

I don't 'pooh pooh' Apple for being more efficient (your words not mine, you haven't provided anything to quantify your efficiency guess), and I don't care how much money Apple makes on something, I just don't want to have to spend more money for something than I have to.
post #70 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

You raise good points but right now in the org it is pretty exciting


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That's a lot of smileys..
post #71 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post

That's a lot of smileys..

It's good to be observant.
post #72 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by HCE View Post

Except that in the mobile space, the overwhelming majority of applications do not make low level API calls. They all call higher-level API calls which are different for each distro. So essentially this is more like three different OSes, each of which just happens to be based on Linux. It isn't like the desktop space where applications will run on pretty much any distro. Each of these variants will have its unique ecosystem which won't overlap with the other. If the companies behind them play their cards right they could succeed in becoming a significant presence in the mobile space.

How does that fragmentation help Linux? It's not like it is easy to develop for more than one Linux distro anyway. Software vendors target RHES, SLES and Ubuntu LTS and let the rest of the users figure out installs themselves.

Quote:
Your statement implies that somehow BSD, as the result of some legacy Unix code, is Unix and Linux isn't.

Yes. BSDs can trace back directly to the unix codebase. As can most uncertified unixes. Linux was a clean code base built against Unix APIs.

Quote:
I frankly don't see why - the two systems diverged over 15 years ago and have changed significantly since. Not to mention the fact, that ever since 1992 when the lawsuit was settled, every other Unix-like OS (Linux included) has been free to incorporate BSD code while BSD itself cannot appropriate code covered by more restrictive licenses (which effectively means that it cannot appropriate any other "Unix" code at all).

That GPL is a one-way street is well understood by BSD users. On the plus side, BSDs have zfs and linux doesn't.

Quote:
Also, in one sense, OS X is the least-Unixy of the lot because it is architecturally quite different from all the other Unixes. It comes from NextStep which was based on the Mach microkernel, which has nothing to do with the original AT&T source code. Everything else has a monolithic kernel like the original Bell Labs version did.

The userland is from FreeBSD and NeXTStep which also inherited BSD code. OSF/1 was also mach based and a true unix. These are all "genetic" unix systems that can trace to code from original unix systems (SysV or BSD).

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Well, it isn't, as you say, that easy - it is going to require a non-trivial amount of time and effort, not to mention money - but, in the larger scheme of things, it is not terribly hard. I have seen news reports that say that Red Hat and Novell are, regardless, in favor of the idea but the final arbiter of all kernel changes is Linus and he is adamantly against it.

It isn't as if there hasn't been kernel changes to make RHEL EAL 4+. That they don't get into the official kernel is just something that RH has to deal with when patching.
post #73 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gucky View Post

You are utterly wrong here! Not only is Linux not derived from Minix but it *is* UNIX! I forget which company it was that payed for the UNIX certification.

That would be because none have. IBM dumped a lot of AIX code into Linux to kill Sun. They succeeded. But they never paid for unix certification of Linux and neither has anyone else.
post #74 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I could say the same thing about the iPhone, especially since it has been over a year since I have seen one in public.

Seen what? An iPhone?
post #75 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post

Seen what? An iPhone?

Yes, I haven't seen an iPhone in public since last year.
post #76 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Yes, I haven't seen an iPhone in public since last year.

WOW! That's a miracle..
post #77 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post

WOW! That's a miracle..

Not really, if you exclude the US, there is only an install base of around 20 million within 6 billion people, statistically it would be rare to see one.
post #78 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Not really, if you exclude the US, there is only an install base of around 20 million within 6 billion people, statistically it would be rare to see one.

I see. Nice calculation BTW.
post #79 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

The move to Maemo is sensible. But should have happened years ago.

Maemo has been around for years.
With the N900 they have added a phone application and made the UI and hardware even
more attractive.

Quote:
The iPhone has three legs on its stool.
OS X (which has an interface built by...)
Cocoa (which is auto-magically rendered by...)
Hardware acceleration.

These three components work together seamlessly to make the iPhone a very slick platform. When you build an app, you can build it from standard parts, run it in native code, and have all the heavy lifting done for you. All the interface is written. Everything makes use of the GPU without the programmer needing to write a single line of code.

If Maemo had the equivalent of this holy trinity , then Nokia would be able to say that they were competitive with the iPhone. They'd have a fighting chance. Despite being 2 years late to the party.

But Maemo does not.

Maemo is just the OS. Not the application UI framework. Not the free hardware acceleration. 3rd party developers would be a little better off than with Symbian. But not by much.

Have you ever looked up what Maemo is before spreading such FUD?
Maemo has free OpenGL ES hardware acceleration, it's main component
is the the easy to use and programm Hildon UI framework.
It's build upon mature components which have been around for much
longer than 2 years.
http://maemo.org/intro/platform/
post #80 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by likelihood View Post

Maemo has been around for years.

..SNIP..

It's build upon mature components which have been around for much
longer than 2 years.

.. SNIP..

While I have to agree with Maemo is way nicer than Symbian Touch, it's still leagues behind iPhone/iPod Touch OS and WebOS. No match.
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