or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › It's official: Apple, China Unicom strike 3-year deal
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

It's official: Apple, China Unicom strike 3-year deal

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
Following weeks of speculation and false reports, Apple and China Unicom have finally hurdled the Great Wall for a three-year deal to sell the iPhone.

Multiple reports have confirmed the agreement on behalf of both China Unicom and Apple. According to The Wall Street Journal, the carrier will offer two versions of the iPhone in the fourth quarter of 2009. As expected, the device will have its Wi-Fi capabilities disabled, as required by government regulations.

China Unicom also plans to launch its 3G network on Sept. 28 in anticipation of the iPhone's debut. The nation's second-largest carrier has an estimated 141 million subscribers, and the state-owned provider will offer 3G access to start in 285 cities, expanding to 335 locations before 2010.

Officials declined to reveal the price of the device, but The Associated Press reported the iPhone was set to sell for a "competitive" price. Previous reports that China Unicom had agreed to pre-purchase 5 million phones were again denied. The report cites analysts at Bank of America Merrill Lynch as saying the phone will likely sell with two-year service contracts for between $99 and $299, as they do in the U.S.

"Apple's talks with potential Chinese carriers had snagged on disagreements about how to share revenues, according to Chinese news reports," the report states. "But (a China Unicom official) said the companies will not share revenues, with Unicom instead buying the phones in batches from (Apple) and offering them with subsidies."

There are still questions whether the Chinese will even be interested in the iPhone. The Journal cites estimates that 1.5 million "underground," hacked and unlocked iPhones are already in use in China. And it also notes that the nation's character-based language doesn't always integrate with user interfaces developed for other countries.

"This definitely opens up a a window for Apple to get into this tremendous market," said Edward Yu, chief executive at Analysys International, a Beijing-based technology research firm, told The Associated Press. "But we still need to see the real product to determine whether this will play with the mainstream China population and how the market reacts."

The new model of the iPhone was given government regulatory approval for use on the China Unicom network in July. That device is a GSM/WCDMA iPhone that operates on the 900MHz, 1700MHz and 1900MHz bands.
post #2 of 40
Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.
post #3 of 40
There is nothing wrong with a monopoly if it is earned and not abused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatSoCALguy View Post

Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.
post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

There is nothing wrong with a monopoly if it is earned and not abused.

not to mention, that we are a VERY long way from being a monopoly, so far, in fact we should even be discussing it
post #5 of 40
With no WiFi available the Chinese should be particularly strong in 3G coverage. Having in mind their territory and the degree of development of rural areas, will they really stand it? Risky investment... Although, with dozens of millions of iPhones sold, none of that matters anymore...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatSoCALguy View Post

Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.

What in the world does this mean? If you don't know what a monopoly is, why are you worried about it?
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

With no WiFi available the Chinese should be particularly strong in 3G coverage. Having in mind their territory and the degree of development of rural areas, will they really stand it? Risky investment... Although, with dozens of millions of iPhones sold, none of that matters anymore...

You can be certain that the rural coverage of 3G will be slim to none. But, keep in mind that 285 cities in China could comprise a much larger population that it might sound like at first. Assuming the largest cities in the country, I would imagine much more population than an entire European country. I didn't look it up, but it wouldn't be that hard to do...

If the iPhone is appealing to them and the cost is right, this could be huge!
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

You can be certain that the rural coverage of 3G will be slim to none. But, keep in mind that 285 cities in China could comprise a much larger population that it might sound like at first. Assuming the largest cities in the country, I would imagine much more population than an entire European country. I didn't look it up, but it wouldn't be that hard to do...

Absolutely. But I still worry - though much less - about connectivity options even in their cities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

If the iPhone is appealing to them and the cost is right, this could be huge!

I have some doubts about virtually everything in this statement.
Firstly, iPhones are not so popular in developing countries, and China is not sufficiently far from developing countries in its status, alas. The price matters there; $100 are quite a money.
Secondly, any connectivity problems may cause the serious customer dissatisfaction. And in this particular case, I regret to say, this dissatisfaction has strong chances to be actively supported at the level of officials.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatSoCALguy View Post

Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.

I don't think that word means what you think it does.
post #10 of 40
Does that open the door for a possible GSM/WCDMA iPhone in North America?

And in the process, possible new carriers.
post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Absolutely. But I still worry - though much less - about connectivity options even in their cities.

I have some doubts about virtually everything in this statement.
Firstly, iPhones are not so popular in developing countries, and China is not sufficiently far from developing countries in its status, alas. The price matters there; $100 are quite a money.
Secondly, any connectivity problems may cause the serious customer dissatisfaction. And in this particular case, I regret to say, this dissatisfaction has strong chances to be actively supported at the level of officials.

I have some doubts about virtually everything in your statement.

Do you think that Apple and China Unicom might just know a little bit more than you?
Rim started selling Blackberrys in China two years ago!

I see that you are in France .....
China has more millionaires than France

Stop your trilling!



(Trill = mild Troll)
post #12 of 40
sic !

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Following weeks of speculation and false reports, Apple and China Unicom have finally hurdled the Great Wall for a three-year deal to sell the iPhone.

Weeks? More like months.
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

I don't think that word means what you think it does.

Was going to pick on the obviously-uninformed use of the word 'monopoly' too, but you already did (and yours was funnier).
post #15 of 40
Now I know why there are no iPhones available at all in Europe, new iPhones probably don't even leave China.
post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatSoCALguy View Post

Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.

There will ALWAYS be an 'iPhone monopoly for Apple'.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

There will ALWAYS be an 'iPhone monopoly for Apple'.

Bingo. LIke they have for the iPod.

Give it 5 more years they will own the smart phone market. Lower price points and more carriers combined with amazing improvements will result in a true monopoly started by the iPhone.
post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

There will ALWAYS be an 'iPhone monopoly for Apple'.

post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

The price matters there; $100 are quite a money.

I have a friend in Shenzhen (South China) and she bought a mobile phone that would cost about $550 USD. Someone stole it from her purse. Another friend in Shenzhen recently purchased a condo for about $1200 USD per month. Now, these are only 2 in over 1 billion, but using them to say... the middle-class in China is growing extremely fast and a lot of people have expendable money these days. I've been there, they are building A LOT of really nice and apartment/condo buildings there for this middle class.

There are A LOT of poor people in China, but not everyone is walking around with lint in their pockets either. $100 USD is not as much there as some may think. On average Chinese save a lot more than Americans/Westerners, they are big on investing and savings. I was just there this summer and another friend spent several hundred in USD while I was there with ease.

And the 285 cities getting 3G coverage, most sizable cities have between 6-18 million people in each. So, keep that in mind and times that by 285 for potential buyer numbers. If just 5% of those buy an iPhone - you are talking about 5 million give or take a few mill.

Chinese aren't buying all those cars and investing in oil for nothing, people have money to spend now. If the iPhone sells for $100-300 USD there, trust me, a lot of people can definitely afford it if they want.

Huzzah Apple.
post #20 of 40
Wireless in the Pac Rim is usually better than in the North America and Europe

Main reason is the 'developing' countries never had a wired infrastructure to deal with so nearly 100% of their investment goes to Wireless.

They probably have better service in 3G in rural areas of China than AT&T does in New York (From what I've heard )
post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

I have a friend in Shenzhen (South China) and she bought a mobile phone that would cost about $550 USD. Someone stole it from her purse. Another friend in Shenzhen recently purchased a condo for about $1200 USD per month. Now, these are only 2 in over 1 billion, but using them to say... the middle-class in China is growing extremely fast and a lot of people have expendable money these days. I've been there, they are building A LOT of really nice and apartment/condo buildings there for this middle class.

There are A LOT of poor people in China, but not everyone is walking around with lint in their pockets either. $100 USD is not as much there as some may think. On average Chinese save a lot more than Americans/Westerners, they are big on investing and savings. I was just there this summer and another friend spent several hundred in USD while I was there with ease.

And the 285 cities getting 3G coverage, most sizable cities have between 6-18 million people in each. So, keep that in mind and times that by 285 for potential buyer numbers. If just 5% of those buy an iPhone - you are talking about 5 million give or take a few mill.

Chinese aren't buying all those cars and investing in oil for nothing, people have money to spend now. If the iPhone sells for $100-300 USD there, trust me, a lot of people can definitely afford it if they want.

Huzzah Apple.

You should re-read my post. $100 (the price of iPhone) were considered in developing country context.
China was not called developing country in my post. Strictly speaking, it is not. It is emerging market, newly industrialized country, etc.

Do you know what the difference with developed countries is? People from there don't bring spending hundreds of dollars as a proof of what ever it may be.
We discuss features of Apple products.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #22 of 40
The question is not whether it will sell, but for how much. The Chinese people love iPhone. The number of hacked copies is a testament to this fact, and those are very pricey, more expensive than we get them here in the US.

As for the characters, that is a no-brainer. I am not Chinese, but I use Chinese characters on my iPhone to communicate with my Chinese friends. It is no different from Japanese characters by that much. iPhone has been in Japan and doing well. It will do well in China too. Apple is about to hit a very big jackpot.

Apple shares are about to explode. Get on board if you can. It is uphill from here!
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

What in the world does this mean? If you don't know what a monopoly is, why are you worried about it?

he feels the device itself somehow jumps past all barriers and becomes a monopoly . i agree the iphone is in great danger of selling exclusive to iphone buyers who choose from they own free will the monopoly iphone . by passing all other iphones

yes
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

You should re-read my post. $100 (the price of iPhone) were considered in developing country context.
China was not called developing country in my post.

OK. I did. Here is what I read:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Firstly, iPhones are not so popular in developing countries, and China is not sufficiently far from developing countries in its status, alas.

So, you were saying that China should be considered as a developing country with respect to phones.
When you contradict yourself like this in the space of a few posts, you will surely draw criticisms of being a troll, but it could just be that you are clueless...

Also:
Quote:
I have some doubts about virtually everything in this statement.

The statement you were doubting was "If the iPhone is appealing to them and the cost is right, this could be huge!" So are you seriously doubting that if something is apealing to many millions of people and if it is priced fairly then it will sell well? That is a strange position to take...
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

I have a friend in Shenzhen (South China) and she bought a mobile phone that would cost about $550 USD. Someone stole it from her purse. Another friend in Shenzhen recently purchased a condo for about $1200 USD per month. Now, these are only 2 in over 1 billion, but using them to say... the middle-class in China is growing extremely fast and a lot of people have expendable money these days. I've been there, they are building A LOT of really nice and apartment/condo buildings there for this middle class.

There are A LOT of poor people in China, but not everyone is walking around with lint in their pockets either. $100 USD is not as much there as some may think. On average Chinese save a lot more than Americans/Westerners, they are big on investing and savings. I was just there this summer and another friend spent several hundred in USD while I was there with ease.

And the 285 cities getting 3G coverage, most sizable cities have between 6-18 million people in each. So, keep that in mind and times that by 285 for potential buyer numbers. If just 5% of those buy an iPhone - you are talking about 5 million give or take a few mill.

Chinese aren't buying all those cars and investing in oil for nothing, people have money to spend now. If the iPhone sells for $100-300 USD there, trust me, a lot of people can definitely afford it if they want.

Huzzah Apple.

Last time I was in Shezhen it was growing like crazy (same story for just about any part of China, really) and there were upscale and luxury cars all over the road. Many, many people have become very wealthy in a short span of time in China.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

So, you were saying that China should be considered as a developing country with respect to phones.

No, I'm not contradicting myself. Trying to replace my words with how you are able to understand them may draw suspicions that you might have been just inexperienced internet forum poster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

The statement you were doubting was "If the iPhone is appealing to them and the cost is right, this could be huge!" So are you seriously doubting that if something is apealing to many millions of people and if it is priced fairly then it will sell well? That is a strange position to take...

No, no, my position is not "strange" at all. (No offence, just curiousness, are you native English speaker?)
In above posts I pointed to customer dissatisfaction, that your statement didn't factor in erroneously, and which would nevertheless be able to influence Apple's business in China. You didn't care to have understood my entire set of arguments, which is about to draw suspicions as described above.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #27 of 40
Has anyone noticed? The 1700 Mhz band? Isn't that what Tmobile USA is using for it's 3G service? If that's indeed true, I see a flood of iphone getting "imported" into the US
post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatSoCALguy View Post

Hopefully, these iPhone deals being struck don't start a iPhone monopoly for Apple. Only time will tell.

Apple has a 100% monopoly on the iPhone.
post #29 of 40
Does anyone see a clear reason for the suppression of wifi in the Chinese version of the iPhone? Is it the telecom partner or the Chinese government that objects? It would seem as though there would be almost no point to the iPod touch. Is it currently available in China? I suppose one might infer that there is not much wifi connectivity available in China but that seems hard to believe.
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

Does anyone see a clear reason for the suppression of wifi in the Chinese version of the iPhone? Is it the telecom partner or the Chinese government that objects?

I only know what the conventional wisdom has been on the boards:
The government would like to have as much control as possible over communications in their country. Without WiFi, all cell phone communications have to go through the small handfull of Cell phone companies making it much easier to monitor, trace and/or shut down if need be.

I don't know if WiFi is prohibited for in home use and neither do I know if Touches are sold there.
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

Does anyone see a clear reason for the suppression of wifi in the Chinese version of the iPhone? Is it the telecom partner or the Chinese government that objects? It would seem as though there would be almost no point to the iPod touch. Is it currently available in China? I suppose one might infer that there is not much wifi connectivity available in China but that seems hard to believe.

If you do an adhoc network of wifi nodes you can make government control/tracking a bit harder. You can do a 802.11 mesh if you really want to.

If everything is 3G the government only has to tell the cell phone company to shut down. Then all the iPhones have zero connectivity. If everything is 3G the government only has to have a tap at the cell phone company making eavesdropping easier.
post #32 of 40
this is clearest answer to your concerns.

http://news.cnet.com/China-implement...3-5112832.html

china has its own wifi security scheme which was rejected by IEEE during 802.11 task force standard rectification. now china's ministry of information enforced that any wifi chip imported has to have its security standard beside IEEE one. considering the time and cost to get the iphone to customers faster, it is wise for apple and china unicom to drop wifi from iphone completely.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

Does anyone see a clear reason for the suppression of wifi in the Chinese version of the iPhone? Is it the telecom partner or the Chinese government that objects? It would seem as though there would be almost no point to the iPod touch. Is it currently available in China? I suppose one might infer that there is not much wifi connectivity available in China but that seems hard to believe.
post #33 of 40
I am a little saddened by the deal as it is another example of bowing down to the all mighty dollar over all other concerns. I despise the Chinese political system. It is oppressive and evil with a thin capitalist skin on it to make it more palatable to the developed world. I love the Chinese people to the extent that I have learned something about them. I would gladly welcome them into American society where I am sure they would thrive. But until China makes some major changes, they should be technologically, socially, and politically isolated from the developed world. The world should not provide products and services that are specifically crippled to help the government control its citizens by keeping them in the dark.

I don't know the long-term solution, but I believe China has to have an internal uprising and throw off the shackles of oppression like all other developed nations have had to do. As long as the US is doing business there, we validate the system and embolden it rather than compromise it. Right now, what we are doing is little more than exploitation. It makes me sick.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I am a little saddened by the deal as it is another example of bowing down to the all mighty dollar over all other concerns. I despise the Chinese political system. It is oppressive and evil with a thin capitalist skin on it to make it more palatable to the developed world. I love the Chinese people to the extent that I have learned something about them. I would gladly welcome them into American society where I am sure they would thrive. But until China makes some major changes, they should be technologically, socially, and politically isolated from the developed world. The world should not provide products and services that are specifically crippled to help the government control its citizens by keeping them in the dark.

I don't know the long-term solution, but I believe China has to have an internal uprising and throw off the shackles of oppression like all other developed nations have had to do. As long as the US is doing business there, we validate the system and embolden it rather than compromise it. Right now, what we are doing is little more than exploitation. It makes me sick.

1) Getting non-Chinese products into the country as popular wares is the first step for removing those shackles. As Chinese citizens become more profitable and the middle class forms it will be harder to maintain the current government.

2) If we were to have a problem with doing business in China it should not be from selling the Chinese an iPhone but from the chinese manufacturing of the iPhone and pretty much everything else we use.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

1) Getting non-Chinese products into the country as popular wares is the first step for removing those shackles. As Chinese citizens become more profitable and the middle class forms it will be harder to maintain the current government.

2) If we were to have a problem with doing business in China it should not be from selling the Chinese an iPhone but from the chinese manufacturing of the iPhone and pretty much everything else we use.

I think #1 is a poor rationalization, albeit, a popular one. It is the moral equivalent of doing business with the Portuguese during the slave trade. We tell ourselves that we will make things better for the people by keeping them in the loop. Doing business without moral judgement is just another way to sell one's soul.

As for #2, I completely agree. We should stop exploiting the Chinese labor market.

In the Star Trek universe, no planet is allowed membership into the Federation until it reaches a certain level of technological, social, and moral maturity. The Federation does not try to upgrade the status of a planet by artificially upgrading its technology. Though it is a fictional universe, it is also a sensible approach. Right now, China deserves our pity, humanitarian aid, and careful scrutiny. In no way is it ready for admission into the "Federation" of developed nations.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
post #36 of 40
how much do you understand the political system in china? or even further in far eastern countries, such as japan and korea? what did you learn from those miserable chinese about them and their "evil" country? i am trying to understand beside the words, such as oppressed or evil, what else you know about china?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I am a little saddened by the deal as it is another example of bowing down to the all mighty dollar over all other concerns. I despise the Chinese political system. It is oppressive and evil with a thin capitalist skin on it to make it more palatable to the developed world. I love the Chinese people to the extent that I have learned something about them. I would gladly welcome them into American society where I am sure they would thrive. But until China makes some major changes, they should be technologically, socially, and politically isolated from the developed world. The world should not provide products and services that are specifically crippled to help the government control its citizens by keeping them in the dark.

I don't know the long-term solution, but I believe China has to have an internal uprising and throw off the shackles of oppression like all other developed nations have had to do. As long as the US is doing business there, we validate the system and embolden it rather than compromise it. Right now, what we are doing is little more than exploitation. It makes me sick.
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by anakin1992 View Post

how much do you understand the political system in china? or even further in far eastern countries, such as japan and korea? what did you learn from those miserable chinese about them and their "evil" country? i am trying to understand beside the words, such as oppressed or evil, what else you know about china?

A little, I suppose. But do not expect me to make an impassioned defense of my statement. I stand by it and then some, but it is not the sort of thing you can convince someone of. If you believe that China is politically, socially, and morally ready to be a full member of the developed nations of the world, more power to you. I have particular ideas about right and wrong and how those concepts apply to individuals and nations. I imagine you do to. I am not picking on China. There are many places in the world that are equally unprepared if not more so. Thing is, we are not courting those nations and seeking to exploit them for our own purposes. When we look at other lands, we do not drool at the prospect of easy money like we do with China. We are hypocrites. The billion souls of China are nothing more than exploitable resources to big companies here in America. We care nothing about human rights. We only care that the middle class is big enough to be a viable market for our luxury items.

Sorry to hijack this thread and turn it into a political free for all. When I think about the evil that goes on in this world everyday, it makes me wish I still believed in hell. Ah, but that veers into religion and I most certainly don't want to go there.

Peace.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

In the Star Trek universe...

O - M - G.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by podlasek View Post

They probably have better service in 3G in rural areas of China than AT&T does in New York (From what I've heard )

Considering China Unicom's 3G network hasn't been launched yet, it is unlikely to be as good as any of the 250 currently running HSPA networks around the world (in 150 countries).
post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by retroneo View Post

Considering China Unicom's 3G network hasn't been launched yet, it is unlikely to be as good as any of the 250 currently running HSPA networks around the world (in 150 countries).

OTOH, the fact that the China Unicom has been confirmed (as of this morning) to be a non-exclusive deal for the Chinese market is very, very good news.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › It's official: Apple, China Unicom strike 3-year deal