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AT&T to roll out high-speed HSPA 7.2 in six U.S. cities this year

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.

The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.

"Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."

The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.

AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.

"With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."

In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.

In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.

The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.
post #2 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.

The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.

"Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."

The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.

AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.

"With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."

In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.

In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.

The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.

Color me shocked: No NY or Philly. The Eastern corridor is invisible to AT&T, apparently.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #3 of 37
I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.
post #4 of 37
Now that should make things Snappy.
post #5 of 37
Oh well... \
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.

The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.

"Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."

The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.

AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.

"With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."

In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.

In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.

The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Until tethering comes to AT&T what's the point? We all have email (MMS is not really needed) and many use cloud based photo sharing sites (as to not bog down everybody with the same pic in the same email).

Agree with the above user as well... no northeast?

AT&T better hope Apple signs that extension as whoever also gets it, you will be considered a 'new sub' on that carrier (new sub price) and I am sure ebay'ing your AT&T 3GS will cover AT&T's prorated ETF.

IMHO = Still no legit tether on AT&T = Fail

Cheers
-wsn
post #7 of 37
I'm sick and tired of AT&T's recent PR push to tout their "investments" in providing quality services. I live in northern NJ and have been in contact with a senior AT&T systems engineer for more than a year, and the areas that were crappy last year are still crappy today. Whatever they're doing isn't resulting in improved end-to-end performance.
post #8 of 37
Call me crazy, but I read that list as AT&T consolidating in the markets where they have a decent lead. Essentially capitulating in those markets where their network is a distant also-ran to their competitor. I get the feeling the next 19 markets will follow that trend.
post #9 of 37
Houston!! Woo hoo! We actually get the hook up....craziness.
post #10 of 37
I live in Charlotte. My downtown gym can receive a 3G signal with full bars inside - but usually I get no bars or Edge. Which means in this case it's not about how well 3G penetrates buildings, it's simple capacity. There are two AT&T buildings in the immediate vicinity(one next door, one within two blocks), at least one with many antennas on the roof.

I live within a mile of downtown. My signal comes and goes like the wind.

6 miles outside the city, within a mile of the area's biggest shopping mall, there are large regions of complete dead space though the coverage maps say otherwise.

Charlotte needs tons of attention from AT&T. It's kind of sad that I'm excited that the carrier I pay for service might actually deliver that service.
post #11 of 37
Charlotte, but not Atlanta? Are you kidding me?
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by moo-shu cereal View Post

Houston!! Woo hoo! We actually get the hook up....craziness.

+1. We get the 850 Mhz spectrum before most places and now we get 7.2 setup as well. Awesome.
post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.

Yeah, but who came up with the simple, one size fits all, unlimited data plan for web and e-mail?

Sounds like an Apple thing to do. If AT&T is solely in control, they could easily price tier the data plans in an effort to curb demand on it's network. If AT&T did try this, how fast would Steve Jobs want the CEO of AT&T in Steve's office in Cupertino???

I bet there are more limitations on the iPhone then we know of, other than AT&T's inability to meet the data demand on it's network that ruins the iPhone experience.

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #14 of 37
Woohoo!
Although I live in Palm Beach, this will give me more reason to visit my g/f in Miami!

I think I should get a iPhone 3G or 3GS first... :-/
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by donlphi View Post

Oh well... \

It seems you guys are left out..
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.

...were Apple's sales forecasts and estimated bandwidth usage per iPhone accurate....and how long did Apple give AT&T to upgrade the network? How could they be accurate when the APP Store wasn't even discussed during the contract negotiations? It takes years to upgrade networks.

By the way, it was Apple who demanded an unlimited data plan for iPhone users. This is one of the root causes of all our problems.
post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.

Right. AT&T should have had perfect foresight.

It's interesting that the iPhone fanboys never blame Apple for choosing to enter into an exclusive contract. Why didn't Apple make their device accessible to multiple carriers?

Further, how is the NYT article biased? Based on all reports, iPhone users place considerable higher demands on the network than do any other smartphone user.

What more do you want AT&T to do? They've spent tens of millions of dollars upgrading their network, they've installed over a thousand new towers, and they give smartphone users free use of their hotspots. Despite all of that, there will always be dead zones, or ares of oversaturation. You can't get something for nothing, and you certainly can't get it overnight.

Grow up, and stop whining like an obnoxious teenager.
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post

What more do you want AT&T to do? They've spent tens of millions of dollars upgrading their network, they've installed over a thousand new towers, and they give smartphone users free use of their hotspots. Despite all of that, there will always be dead zones, or ares of oversaturation. You can't get something for nothing, and you certainly can't get it overnight.

Grow up, and stop whining like an obnoxious teenager.

I'm not the one you're calling names, but I'll answer your first question nevertheless. Me, I want AT&T to stop selling phones in markets where its service is already strained to the point of basically not working during peak hours.

As an existing AT&T customer, I'm angry that my service continues to get worse and worse (I went three days this weekend literally unable to make a single call from home, due to a large festival nearby). New customers have to be at least that angry, finding that their new phone really only works during off-peak hours, and drops plenty of calls even then.

The responsible thing for AT&T to do would be to say "cripes, we way underestimated demand, we're working as fast as we can to improve our network, and in the meantime we'll limit sales in the most affected markets so it at least doesn't get worse for everyone."

I think it's reasonable to blame AT&T for past failures, though it does little constructive good. I think it's very, very reasonable to blame them for continuing to make the problem worse with every phone they sell into some markets. It's insane that they're so focused on short term revenue that they'll destroy their reputation and drive long-term customers away to get it. That's' terrible business.
post #19 of 37
AT&Ts 3G speeds in St. Louis are absolutely PATHETIC.

I typically get 100k down and up. We are supposedly paying for 3,000 down on the so called "fastest" 3G network around.

If $30 a month is supposed to cover 3000 down, I think I might start sending them $1 a month for my 100 down.

I'll pay for what they give me and we'll see how they like it.
post #20 of 37
I recommend _reducing_ download speeds in NYC.
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by donlphi View Post

Oh well... \

Let them work-out the network problems in those other cities. I'd rather not be the beta with dropped calls and service issues. Let some other city cut their teeth with the new bandwidth tech.
post #22 of 37
I generally believe that AT&T was blindsided by the popularity of the iPhone -- particularly once the iPhone 3G was released. AT&T never had the best network. But when you were using a RAZR, the lackluster performance wasn't all the surprising when you were using a pretty lackluster device. Often, it was hard to say whether the problem was the phone or the network -- either one would be easily believable.

But the high quality of the iPhone casts the mediocrity of AT&T's network into sharp relief. Apple worked hard to create a device that was elegant and polished. Even though it didn't do everything, what it did, it did brilliantly. So when you did encounter a problem, it was so clearly not the device's fault. It was the network.

Now, add millions of iPhones, each one consuming a generous amount of data over 3G. That would make any network buckle, and I don't believe Verizon could have built out fast enough to accommodate the onslaught of iPhone users either.

The iPhone and other current smartphones also represent a significant change for all the cellular networks. Except for dedicated BlackBerry users, cellular data has until now been more of a novelty than an essential feature. But data is an essential requirement of the iPhone.

From the consumer's perspective, the problem is simple: the network doesn't work as well as they think it should, and they don't feel like they're getting a good value for their money. But the situation is always a lot more complicated than consumers like to make it. Believe me, we'd be cursing Verizon just as vociferously if they were the iPhone's exclusive US carrier.

The solution, which AT&T will never admit, is that a good iPhone experience can only be had if the users are spread out among multiple networks. All the carriers still have a lot of work to do to accommodate the huge amount of data users will consume in the coming years as all devices get smarter, but the multiple carrier solution is the only one that would give AT&T's network the relief it needs to work well.

I believe this will work out in a year or so when Apple's exclusivity agreement with AT&T runs out. The number of potential iPhone customers who are willing to use AT&T's network is going to run out at some point, and the tipping point will come soon, I think, when the gains made by offering the iPhone on multiple networks will outweigh the lost revenue from carrier subsidies that come with exclusivity.
post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooksT View Post

As an existing AT&T customer, I'm angry that my service continues to get worse and worse (I went three days this weekend literally unable to make a single call from home, due to a large festival nearby).

The responsible thing for AT&T to do would be to say "cripes, we way underestimated demand, we're working as fast as we can to improve our network, and in the meantime we'll limit sales in the most affected markets so it at least doesn't get worse for everyone."

No wireless carrier can control the physical locations of their customers. The planners for your weekend festival should have called up every wireless carrier and asked for temporary, portable cell towers (on trucks) to service the crowds.

Also, cell phones are portable. If you stop selling in some markets due to network saturation, what is going to stop someone from driving a few miles to buy it elsewhere?
post #24 of 37
Seems that they should really be pushing to get DC Metro area on their side and upgrade the networks that service Congress, the FCC, etc.
--Larry
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post #25 of 37
I'm not expecting any grand roll out of this anytime soon. Most of their network hasn't been upgraded to normal 3G and last time I checked, they have a tendency to put in the least amount of towers absolutely necessary.
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

I'm not expecting any grand roll out of this anytime soon. Most of their network hasn't been upgraded to normal 3G and last time I checked, they have a tendency to put in the least amount of towers absolutely necessary.

That is true with any wireless carrier....most cell towers are located on leased property (monthly rent).....the fewer the towers, the lower the cost for us.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by noexpectations View Post

No wireless carrier can control the physical locations of their customers. The planners for your weekend festival should have called up every wireless carrier and asked for temporary, portable cell towers (on trucks) to service the crowds.

I can't claim to be knowledgeable about the exact mechanics of who calls who, but friends' phones on Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile even were working fine during this *annual* Memorial day festival that draws around 150,000 people a day for three days. Maybe someone forgot to call AT&T, and the company isn't set up to notice and respond to a huge network failure over a holiday weekend.

My guess is that AT&T just couldn't support the volume, either due to lack of portable cells or due to lack of backhaul. One way or the other, I'm not buying the AT&T apologist angle. My phone says AT&T; if it doesn't work for a few days straight, I'm blaming AT&T. This fairground didn't just appear overnight, you know.

Quote:
Also, cell phones are portable. If you stop selling in some markets due to network saturation, what is going to stop someone from driving a few miles to buy it elsewhere?

Well, we're talking metro areas, so say it'd be a 50 mile drive. Still, nothing would stop people. It would, however, reduce the volume sold, and slow the gradual but noticeable disintegration of service for existing customers. It's not a perfect solution, but it does at least address the "when you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging" problem.

AT&T's network and business failures are complex. I'd be more willing to blame Apple, festival organizers, and Lee Harvey Oswald if AT&T wasn't actively making the problem worse. Until they indicate that they're taking every step possible to improve service, including foregoing short term revenue in massively oversubscribed markets, I'm going to hold them primarily responsible for the crappy service they're providing.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Yeah, but who came up with the simple, one size fits all, unlimited data plan for web and e-mail?

Sounds like an Apple thing to do. If AT&T is solely in control, they could easily price tier the data plans in an effort to curb demand on it's network. If AT&T did try this, how fast would Steve Jobs want the CEO of AT&T in Steve's office in Cupertino???

I bet there are more limitations on the iPhone then we know of, other than AT&T's inability to meet the data demand on it's network that ruins the iPhone experience.

--------------------------------------------------
AT&T knew this from day one. Nobody held a gun to their head.
They also had from Jun 2007 ->Jun 2009 to get that 3G network
up an running. Data is also NOT unlimited. It is limited by the contract.
Apple needs to make a 'world phone' and sell the iPhone the old way
(full price) for use on any carrier.
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooksT View Post

Me, I want AT&T to stop selling phones in markets where its service is already strained to the point of basically not working during peak hours.

What about Apple selling phones?

I mean once the user gets the phone, they go to AT&T for the network, good or as poor as it may be, because the phone is nothing without a service provider. So Apple would have to agree to not to sell in over saturated markets or markets where AT&T service underperforms.

I don't think that is going to happen though, because Apple is in the business of selling iPhones.

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #30 of 37
I'm surprised and psyched Charlotte is on the list. I don't have one myself but actually most people I know locally with an iPhone say they rarely get dropped calls and 3G coverage is pretty good so maybe their coverage here is better than their average.
post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Llama View Post

Seems that they should really be pushing to get DC Metro area on their side and upgrade the networks that service Congress, the FCC, etc.

Oddly, DC seems to be an iPhone enclave. I've heard very few complaints about 3g service here, probably because it is a Blackberry kind of town. Time will tell I spose.

As for the "Verizon would have been just as overloaded" argument, agreed, to a point. Verizon has been pouring, nay, shoveling money into upgrades for years, getting ready for LTE and before that 3g. So yes, there would have been problems, but likely not as many.

Also, yes, Apple would have to build a CDMA iPhone. Apparently "everyone knows" Apple would never in a goog-illion years dare to put a CDMA radio in their phone instead of a GSM. They could have just made both. The extra sales would more than make up for the extra cost.

AND, more to the point, it would have spread out that bandwidth crunch. So it's not really AT&T OR Verizon, but if it was AT&T AND Verizon, you'd have fewer problems.

I know Verizon wanted more control, blah blah blah. The reality is this: My dad walked into an AT&T Store and the guy told him they'd have iPhones in in about a week. He walked out and walked into an Apple store. 12 minutes later he walked out with an activated phone. If that isn't the most telling thing, I don't know what is.
post #32 of 37
Also let's be sure to put this announcement in the context of their original 3G announcements.
post #33 of 37
snappy, snappy, 100x snappier... Calls will be dropped quicker...
why are they so clueless about their own business?

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #34 of 37
How can they put north carolina and texas before NYC? Why do rednecks need 7.2Mbps Speed for? AT&T needs to get their priorities straight.
Los Angeles, California and Miami, Florida are understandable but again not before the most important place on earth (NYC), We are after all responsible for this countries economy.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAre View Post

How can they put north carolina and texas before NYC? Why do rednecks need 7.2Mbps Speed for? AT&T needs to get their priorities straight.
Los Angeles, California and Miami, Florida are understandable but again not before the most important place on earth (NYC), We are after all responsible for this countries economy.

Nice post. Actually, there are tons of people in Charlotte who have fled from the Northeast. Being a redneck must be desirable.

I was surprised to see Miami. I was down there two months ago and the coverage was great, compared to here. I look forward to any improvements they can make.

BTW - this might not be true since last year, but it was for a while:
"Measured by control of assets, Charlotte is the second largest banking headquarters in the United States after New York City"
-Wikipedia
post #36 of 37
Meanwhile Telecom Italia in Italy completed network and backhaul upgrades and activated HSPA 28Mbit in June.

Telstra in Australia has almost completed the nationwide rollout and upgrades for 21Mbit (The cities had it in Feb) and will activate 42Mbit in the cities in the next two months.
post #37 of 37
Wouldn't Apple actually have to put a GSM AND a CDMA radio in the phone to work on the current Verizon network and work outside the country? Isn't that how Verizon "world" phones work now? CDMA in the US and GSM outside the US?

Does anyone think Apple would release a model that could only be used IN the US and not work in other countries? Though most people would never use them outside the country, that is just the type of thing that competitors and Internet "experts" would jump all over. I can see RIM discussing the unlimited usage area for the Storm on a big globe in their ads already.

By being on a GSM carrier in the US, the iPhone can be used on any network that supports the same frequencies worldwide.

Disclamer: I'm not a Verizon customer, but I do support our users who have Verizon phones. So, I do have a bit of familairity with their products, but please pardon my ignorance if this is wrong.
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