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Apple rivals DVD with new iTunes Extras for movies and albums

post #1 of 111
Thread Starter 
The new iTunes 9 offers special "iTunes Extras" as free downloads with the purchase of "iTunes LP" albums or movies. The new free bonus content is delivered as a self-contained website of bonus materials, making it easy to author.

Apple's new move into bonus materials helps to enrich its media downloads, making iTunes digital albums more attractive to purchase as a complete set and positioning its movies better against the bonus features available on DVDs. Apple has offered simple PDF digital booklets with certain albums in the past, a step the new Extras builds upon. The DVD Forum has attempted to deliver DVD-A its own specification for value-added music albums, and Blu-Ray has similarly floated an audio version of the format, but along with SA-CD and other attempts to improve upon the CD, these efforts have all fizzled.

Previously referred to under the Cocktail codename, Apple's new initiative delivers a single .ite file along with standard purchased album tracks or the movie file. The iTunes Extra file is actually a bundle, which is directory of files masquerading as a single file. Inside the bundle are navigation pages built using web-standards including HTML pages, Javascript code and CSS presentation, along with content folders containing regular PNG graphics, AAC audio and H.264 video files. The package is essentially a self-contained website, although its FairPlay content requires iTunes 9 to view.

The ease of building this Extras content should help popularize the new bonus materials, and a quick review of the iTunes Store shows a variety of artists' albums and movie titles sporting the new bonus materials. Unlike earlier attempts to create a super CD format, iTunes doesn't require anything more than a software update to the free version 9 in order to play the new Extras content.



The newly unveiled Cocktail initiative may help explain why Apple hasn't thrown much effort behind developing its DVD authoring tools recently, and why it has pointedly ignored the Blu-Ray authoring market. DVD authoring requires participating in a licensing program that includes a book of authoring specifications.

Apple Shuns DVD and Blu-Ray Authoring

Apple entered the DVD authoring business when it bought Astarte in 2000, resulting in DVD Studio Pro and the consumer-oriented iDVD title. It then bought Spruce Technologies and released that company's authoring tools as DVD Studio Pro 2.0. Since the 4.x release in early 2006, Apple has done little to update the program, which still ships as part of Final Cut Studio. The iDVD portion of iLife has similarly only received the barest of attention over the last few years.

While Apple updated its DVD authoring tools to support changes required to create HD-DVD discs, it never threw its support being the format, which has since collapsed after a protracted battle against the rival Blu-Ray specification. Similarly, despite being a member of the Blu-Ray Disk Association, Apple hasn't released authoring tools for that format either. Apple recently added raw Blu-Ray disc burning support to Final Cut Studio, but this lacks any capacity to actually author navigation; the resulting Blu-Ray disc just contains plain video. This is commonly used to distribute edited work for review. Third party tools are required to author a fancy user interface for finished Blu-Ray discs targeted at consumers.

The Blu-Ray specification uses navigation and content presentation tools based upon Sun's Java, called BD-J, to both frame the video and any interactive bonus content on the disc. It is also designed to enable accessing the Internet to find additional content published after the disc was shipped. Different Blu-ray players support different minimal versions of the BD-J, and the BD-J runtime results in significant hardware requirements (similar to a low end PC) which have priced Blu-Ray players out of the mainstream of the market.

Apple's Competitive Cocktail

By offering easy to create, standards-based bonus content that does not require complex and convoluted authoring tools, Apple appears to be hoping to convert more users from DVD disc buyers to iTunes download customers. While downloaded videos can't match the quality of Blu-Ray movies, the mass market has still not embraced the Blu-ray format, leaving Apple with a large market to address.

Presenting iTunes Extras on Apple TV, and potentially on mobile devices such as the iPhone and iPod touch, may also follow as Apple builds out its efforts to popularize albums and movies with the bonus materials.

For both movies and albums, iTunes Extras also differentiate Apple's own offerings in iTunes from identical content sold by other content distributors, such as Amazon.
post #2 of 111
wheres the beatles ???
whats in a name ? 
beatles
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whats in a name ? 
beatles
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post #3 of 111
Movies only in some countries. DVD importing should be added anyway. People shouldn't have to break the law to watch content they already own.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #4 of 111
So has anyone been able to spot the old 'upgrade your iTunes purchases to iTunes Plus purchases a la carte" option? I can't seem to locate it.
post #5 of 111
I'd love to buy all new movies as downloads but simply refuse to pay the same price as physical DVDs or Blu Rays, why should I?

They don't have to burn it to disc, seal it, ship it and pay shops commision, downloads should reflect this but they don't!
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #6 of 111
Do you get the extras when you rent a movie, or only when you buy it? Because there's no way in hell I'm paying $20 to buy an "HD" movie that's compressed to 1/10th the size of the equivalent film on Blu-Ray for about the same price.
post #7 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by wws View Post

So has anyone been able to spot the old 'upgrade your iTunes purchases to iTunes Plus purchases a la carte" option? I can't seem to locate it.

It's the same place it's always been on the home page, in the top of the right hand column. It just says "iTunes Plus" now and gives a potentially rough count of how many items are available to upgrade (apparently it's been dumbed down since for me it only says 25+ whereas iTunes 8 gave an exact figure).

As for this iTunes Extras thing rivaling DVD, I'd have to say, "Not really." As far as has been said, all the bonus content is stuck on on your computer. Hardly how I want to watch a movie or the bonus features. And even if it comes to the AppleTV, that would still require someone to go buy an AppleTV and then start purchasing these movies instead of just buying the DVD for the machine they already have (and have another device attached to the TV with yet another remote). Doesn't really sound like a good prospect for a product that doesn't provide anything new. No doubt fanboys on this site will latch onto it and declare DVD dead; DVD is dying but it's Blu-Ray that is killing it, not iTunes movie downloads or even the entire movie download market.
post #8 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The new iTunes 9 offers special "iTunes Extras" as free downloads with the purchase of "iTunes LP" albums or movies. The new free bonus content is delivered as a self-contained website of bonus materials, making it easy to author.

Apple's new move into bonus materials helps to enrich its media downloads, making iTunes digital albums more attractive to purchase as a complete set and positioning its movies better against the bonus features available on DVDs. Apple has offered simple PDF digital booklets with certain albums in the past, a step the new Extras builds upon. The DVD Forum has attempted to deliver DVD-A its own specification for value-added music albums, and Blu-Ray has similarly floated an audio version of the format, but along with SA-CD and other attempts to improve upon the CD, these efforts have all fizzled.

Previously referred to under the Cocktail codename, Apple's new initiative delivers a single .ite file along with standard purchased album tracks or the movie file. The iTunes Extra file is actually a bundle, which is directory of files masquerading as a single file. Inside the bundle are navigation pages built using web-standards including HTML pages, Javascript code and CSS presentation, along with content folders containing regular PNG graphics, AAC audio and H.264 video files. The package is essentially a self-contained website, although its FairPlay content requires iTunes 9 to view.

The ease of building this Extras content should help popularize the new bonus materials, and a quick review of the iTunes Store shows a variety of artists' albums and movie titles sporting the new bonus materials. Unlike earlier attempts to create a super CD format, iTunes doesn't require anything more than a software update to the free version 9 in order to play the new Extras content.



The newly unveiled Cocktail initiative may help explain why Apple hasn't thrown much effort behind developing its DVD authoring tools recently, and why it has pointedly ignored the Blu-Ray authoring market. DVD authoring requires participating in a licensing program that includes a book of authoring specifications.

Apple Shuns DVD and Blu-Ray Authoring

Apple entered the DVD authoring business when it bought Astarte in 2000, resulting in DVD Studio Pro and the consumer-oriented iDVD title. It then bought Spruce Technologies and released that company's authoring tools as DVD Studio Pro 2.0. Since the 4.x release in early 2006, Apple has done little to update the program, which still ships as part of Final Cut Studio. The iDVD portion of iLife has similarly only received the barest of attention over the last few years.

While Apple updated its DVD authoring tools to support changes required to create HD-DVD discs, it never threw its support being the format, which has since collapsed after a protracted battle against the rival Blu-Ray specification. Similarly, despite being a member of the Blu-Ray Disk Association, Apple hasn't released authoring tools for that format either. Apple recently added raw Blu-Ray disc burning support to Final Cut Studio, but this lacks any capacity to actually author navigation; the resulting Blu-Ray disc just contains plain video. This is commonly used to distribute edited work for review. Third party tools are required to author a fancy user interface for finished Blu-Ray discs targeted at consumers.

The Blu-Ray specification uses navigation and content presentation tools based upon Sun's Java, called BD-J, to both frame the video and any interactive bonus content on the disc. It is also designed to enable accessing the Internet to find additional content published after the disc was shipped. Different Blu-ray players support different minimal versions of the BD-J, and the BD-J runtime results in significant hardware requirements (similar to a low end PC) which have priced Blu-Ray players out of the mainstream of the market.

Apple's Competitive Cocktail

By offering easy to create, standards-based bonus content that does not require complex and convoluted authoring tools, Apple appears to be hoping to convert more users from DVD disc buyers to iTunes download customers. While downloaded videos can't match the quality of Blu-Ray movies, the mass market has still not embraced the Blu-ray format, leaving Apple with a large market to address.

Presenting iTunes Extras on Apple TV, and potentially on mobile devices such as the iPhone and iPod touch, may also follow as Apple builds out its efforts to popularize albums and movies with the bonus materials.

For both movies and albums, iTunes Extras also differentiate Apple's own offerings in iTunes from identical content sold by other content distributors, such as Amazon.

I agree, I find these features to be compelling enough. If I can throw the same content at AppleTV then I think my media centre wish list could be solved by an iTunes AppleTV Combination.

I am not sure though how the lack of focus by Apple on the authoring front has so much at all to do with the consuming end, unless Apple are going to offer this authoring facility to end users to run their content through itunes? Nothing in the article suggests that to be the case, although if the tools were available it would be awesome way to retrofit previously obtained content.
post #9 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

wheres the beatles ???

Paul is dead, John Lennon buried him personally or hadn't you heard?!?!

Sorry... as you were
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
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post #10 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple Shuns DVD and Blu-Ray Authoring

Apple entered the DVD authoring business when it bought Astarte in 2000, resulting in DVD Studio Pro and the consumer-oriented iDVD title. It then bought Spruce Technologies and released that company's authoring tools as DVD Studio Pro 2.0. Since the 4.x release in early 2006, Apple has done little to update the program, which still ships as part of Final Cut Studio. The iDVD portion of iLife has similarly only received the barest of attention over the last few years.

While Apple updated its DVD authoring tools to support changes required to create HD-DVD discs, it never threw its support being the format, which has since collapsed after a protracted battle against the rival Blu-Ray specification. Similarly, despite being a member of the Blu-Ray Disk Association, Apple hasn't released authoring tools for that format either. Apple recently added raw Blu-Ray disc burning support to Final Cut Studio, but this lacks any capacity to actually author navigation; the resulting Blu-Ray disc just contains plain video. This is commonly used to distribute edited work for review. Third party tools are required to author a fancy user interface for finished Blu-Ray discs targeted at consumers.

The Blu-Ray specification uses navigation and content presentation tools based upon Sun's Java, called BD-J, to both frame the video and any interactive bonus content on the disc. It is also designed to enable accessing the Internet to find additional content published after the disc was shipped. Different Blu-ray players support different minimal versions of the BD-J, and the BD-J runtime results in significant hardware requirements (similar to a low end PC) which have priced Blu-Ray players out of the mainstream of the market.

Unless Apple's going to start letting any video professional (not just the five major movie studios) publish content on iTunes — free and otherwise — then their approach to HD distribution is terribly flawed. It's depressing to think that Apple's focus has shifted from helping it's users create original content to helping the major film and record studios sell their shit.

Regarding the claim that Blu-Ray players are priced "out of the mainstream of the market", they're cheaper than an Apple TV or two of the three iPod Touch models. Who in their right mind would spend $229 to get their overpriced, overcompressed digital movies (of which the selection is limited I might add) onto their HDTV, when they could spend about the same on a Blu-Ray player (whose movies cost the same but are ten times larger in file size) that also includes Netflix streaming, Blockbuster streaming, Pandora streaming and YouTube support.
post #11 of 111
Quote:
Apple rivals DVD with new iTunes Extras for movies

post #12 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

I'd love to buy all new movies as downloads but simply refuse to pay the same price as physical DVDs or Blu Rays, why should I?

They don't have to burn it to disc, seal it, ship it and pay shops commision, downloads should reflect this but they don't!


And then you have to spend extra money to back them up

I'd buy an xbox for the netflix integration but I'd rather get blu-Ray on ps3
post #13 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

And then you have to spend extra money to back them up

I'd buy an xbox for the netflix integration but I'd rather get blu-Ray on ps3

And the movie is authorized on 5 computers compared to the disc can play back on any DVD player in the house.
post #14 of 111
I bought Iron Man last year from iTunes, can I now upgrade it to the newer version with the extra features?
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post #15 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

I bought Iron Man last year from iTunes, can I now upgrade it to the newer version with the extra features?

Yes you can. Buy the Blu-Ray copy for twenty bucks at Best Buy.
post #16 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Yes you can. Buy the Blu-Ray copy for twenty bucks at Best Buy.

Cory, thanks for taking the time to actually not answer my question.

I like the lack of physical media my home is currently enjoying, which is why I am happy to pay for digital downloads.
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post #17 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post



Right, it rivals dying man. I would like Apple to rivals BD or join it if they cannot beat it.
post #18 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

It's the same place it's always been on the home page, in the top of the right hand column. It just says "iTunes Plus" now and gives a potentially rough count of how many items are available to upgrade (apparently it's been dumbed down since for me it only says 25+ whereas iTunes 8 gave an exact figure).

As for this iTunes Extras thing rivaling DVD, I'd have to say, "Not really." As far as has been said, all the bonus content is stuck on on your computer. Hardly how I want to watch a movie or the bonus features. And even if it comes to the AppleTV, that would still require someone to go buy an AppleTV and then start purchasing these movies instead of just buying the DVD for the machine they already have (and have another device attached to the TV with yet another remote). Doesn't really sound like a good prospect for a product that doesn't provide anything new. No doubt fanboys on this site will latch onto it and declare DVD dead; DVD is dying but it's Blu-Ray that is killing it, not iTunes movie downloads or even the entire movie download market.

I couldn't have said it better myself...I have a feeling it's all to do with the licensing, as this post says. It would be too easy to just rent movies from Netflix, blockbuster, etc. and just burn them to iTunes. I do that already with music. Just borrow a some CD's from friends or the library and burn them to iTunes. Imagine how much money the movie/TV industry would loose if you could just simply download any movie you wanted to iTunes, now including special features. It would be too easy.

Of course this may sound like i'm defending Apple or the Movie industry for not giving the consumer what they've been asking for since iTunes went movie, but it's not. It really pisses me off that Apple seems to just thumb their proverbial noses at physical media. There is a benefit people! A hard drive will last you 10 years at best before crashing and even if you constantly back up stuff...it's just too much work for the non-IT person that i am.

If i want to buy an album, i get the CD, or just borrow it from a friend and make a back up. I've purchased about 5-10 albums from iTunes and only back episodes of the Daily show for video, since you can't buy that in a store. I buy physical media because it lasts longer than computer hardware. Even DVD/BD players are backwards compatible.

And let's not even get into the whole sharing thing. OK, it's great an convenient that you can share everything and download everything on up to 5 computers, but what if you're not married with kids? What if you break up with someone? How in the heck are you going to split up your iTunes collection between you two? If you're not an IT person then you probably will not. and you'll loose a ton of stuff. I'm not tech savvy enough to deal with it.

For all you who say physical media is dead now...think again.
post #19 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

Cory, thanks for taking the time to actually not answer my question.

I like the lack of physical media my home is currently enjoying, which is why I am happy to pay for digital downloads.

If the honest answer was yes, I would have let you know.
post #20 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

I bought Iron Man last year from iTunes, can I now upgrade it to the newer version with the extra features?

Thats a good question. Apple had iTunes Plus available for the additional 30¢, but the contracts may be very different with this. Im sure there will be articles about how to do it or why Apple sucks if you cant once these extras start appearing for currently available films.
post #21 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

And let's not even get into the whole sharing thing. OK, it's great an convenient that you can share everything and download everything on up to 5 computers, but what if you're not married with kids? What if you break up with someone? How in the heck are you going to split up your iTunes collection between you two? If you're not an IT person then you probably will not. and you'll loose a ton of stuff. I'm not tech savvy enough to deal with it.

My understanding of it is that you can only "share" amongst computers in your home who use the same iTunes account. So if your spouse and kids have their own, you still can't share amongst eachother.
post #22 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

I bought Iron Man last year from iTunes, can I now upgrade it to the newer version with the extra features?

You can sell your copy on eBay and buy the Blu-ray version.
post #23 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Different Blu-ray players support different minimal versions of the BD-J, and the BD-J runtime results in significant hardware requirements (similar to a low end PC) which have priced Blu-Ray players out of the mainstream of the market.

You mean, a bit like Apple's products?
post #24 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

You can sell your copy on eBay and buy the Blu-ray version.

Another flaw of digital media; absolutely zero resale value.
post #25 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Another flaw of digital media; absolutely zero resale value.

Cars and houses are the only thing I would buy where I actually cared about resale value.
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post #26 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

My understanding of it is that you can only "share" amongst computers in your home who use the same iTunes account. So if your spouse and kids have their own, you still can't share amongst eachother.

This is the top reason I don't buy from iTunes, that authorized to play thing is just not for me. If I bought it, I am authorized.
post #27 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

If I bought it, I am authorized.

Can I get an amen?
post #28 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

Cars and houses are the only thing I would buy where I actually cared about resale value.

With digital media, you can't even give something away. You can't pawn it, you can't ebay it, you can't rummage it. You can't even borrow a book/CD/movie to or from a friend. Want to sell an old game console and bundle all of the games you bought to sweeten the deal? When digital media takes over, you won't be able to. Want to hand it down to a younger sibling or nephew? You won't even be able to do that. All of these limitations, coupled with the lower quality and equal pricing means digital media is only a win for the studios and the companies pedaling their content, like Apple.
post #29 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

With digital media, you can't even give something away. You can't pawn it, you can't ebay it, you can't rummage it. You can't even borrow a book/CD/movie to or from a friend. Want to sell an old game console and bundle all of the games you bought to sweeten the deal? When digital media takes over, you won't be able to. Want to hand it down to a younger sibling or nephew? You won't even be able to do that. All of these limitations, coupled with the lower quality and equal pricing means digital media is only a win for the studios and the companies pedaling their content, like Apple.

And yet, despite all that digital media keeps on growing and growing. While there is no single media that will appeal to everyone, you fail to see that convenience is important factor. By your calculations Hulu should have never had anyone watching it and iTunes should have never had real sales, much less being the #1 worldwide distributor of music. Convenience should never be ignored. There is a long list of “superior” technologies that have failed because they were more cumbersome and/or more costly than “lesser" technologies.
post #30 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDunno View Post

I bought Iron Man last year from iTunes, can I now upgrade it to the newer version with the extra features?

my guess would be yes, considering they let us upgrade our music purchases for an additional fee, so i'd expect to see that.
post #31 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

. . . I buy physical media because it lasts longer than computer hardware. For all you who say physical media is dead now...think again.

For all of you thinking that ALL Cds and DVDs last longer than computer hardware . . . think again. I have digital tapes from 12 years ago that still work. Zip cartridges from 15 years ago that still work. Etc., etc., etc. Heck, I even have a Mac FX that still cranks up. But I also have not-so savvy friends who have music CDs that are less than 7 years old that can't play worth a damn. You have to take in care, environment, maintenance, etc. It all depends. It all depends.
post #32 of 111
Wow, rivals DVDs with extras, awsome.

When are they going to rival DVDs for price?
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post #33 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

And yet, despite all that digital media keeps on growing and growing. While there is no single media that will appeal to everyone, you fail to see that convenience is important factor. By your calculations Hulu should have never had anyone watching it and iTunes should have never had real sales, much less being the #1 worldwide distributor of music. Convenience should never be ignored. There is a long list of “superior” technologies that have failed because they were more cumbersome and/or more costly than “lesser" technologies.

Hulu is free; if they started charging a subscription fee they'd disappear almost overnight. Digital distribution isn't bad for inexpensive things — like 99 cent songs — where consumers can cherry pick just the songs they want for a fraction of the price. Larger investments, like $10 albums or $20 movies, is another story altogether. We know iTunes is killing the album sale; hence the studios pressure to add LP features to sweeten the deal, and extras with movie purchases. I think Apple and the rest of the digital distributors are finding that for $10 - $20, consumers have a harder time feeling like they're getting their money's worth with a virtual copy.

Instant gratification might work for songs — again they are small and cheap — but given that you have to wait hours for your movie to download before you can watch it there's not much of an advantage; I can drive to the store and buy a real copy faster than I can get to watching a crappy iTunes copy that costs me the same. Add to that the fact that distribution rights/release windows limit any digital content provider from building an infinite library of movies the way Apple has with music, and you'll never see movies go the way of music.
post #34 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

I can drive to the store and buy a real copy faster than I can get to watching a crappy iTunes copy that costs me the same.

That just shows you that convenience is important to even you. I can purchase a video on iTunes, on Netflix streaming, or on Pay-Per-View and have them all start playing right away. If I had a such a slow internet connection to wit I could "drive to the store and buy a real copy faster than I can get to watching a crappy iTunes copy” then i would likely be going to the store to rent my movies instead of use these inferior in quality yet vastly faster (for me) options. Convenience is very important and you’ll see video increase year after year.
post #35 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Hulu is free; if they started charging a subscription fee they'd disappear almost overnight. ...

Hulu is not free.

"Free with ads" is not "free." You are paying to watch the program by being forced to watch the ads.

It's also bit of a mis-characterisation to talk about "free" or "paid" when you are talking about ephemeral things like streamed content and broadcasts. One can never own anything Hulu puts out, you don't "have" anything in your hand or on your shelf at home.

I know this is part of the same argument you are making, but you can't really compare ownership of media with consumption of media streams. That's part of the reason why Jobs insists that people want to own their media, because being a smart guy, he wants to own his.

Even though ownership of digital media items is a somewhat lesser ownership than owning a physical copy, and even though owning a physical DVD or Cd is somewhat of a lesser ownership than owning older media like a book or film, it's still ownership of some kind.
post #36 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitoC View Post

For all of you thinking that ALL Cds and DVDs last longer than computer hardware . . . think again. I have digital tapes from 12 years ago that still work. Zip cartridges from 15 years ago that still work. Etc., etc., etc. Heck, I even have a Mac FX that still cranks up. But I also have not-so savvy friends who have music CDs that are less than 7 years old that can't play worth a damn. You have to take in care, environment, maintenance, etc. It all depends. It all depends.

well, your friends must have the worst CD etiquette on the planet then. My first CD (the 3" single of "One" by metallica) still plays and is flawlessly clean. It boggles my mind when i get rentals from blockbuster or Netflix that's all scratched up. which is one of the reasons why i stopped going to Blockbuster, netflix is way better about care with DVD's.

Out of the the 400+ CD's i own, i've had only to re-purchase one because it fell out of my bag and hit the concrete. The rest are flawless, and i'm not really all that careful. Plus, not that they are all safely downloaded on iTunes i have my entire collection in my pocket.

Studio CD's (from what i've read) are supposed to last up to 100 years. Way longer than any human needs and for Technology to trump it.

If a CD is out lasted by a piece of computer hardware, then you've got problems.
post #37 of 111
post #38 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

Wow, rivals DVDs with extras, awsome.

When are they going to rival DVDs for price?

More like when are they gonna rival DVDs in resolution?
post #39 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

You can sell your copy on eBay and buy the Blu-ray version.

You can sell your iTunes version? Who would buy that?
post #40 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

I'd love to buy all new movies as downloads but simply refuse to pay the same price as physical DVDs or Blu Rays, why should I?

They don't have to burn it to disc, seal it, ship it and pay shops commision, downloads should reflect this but they don't!

Amen. It's preposterous that the have same prices. Shipping burning mass producing and store costs with actual stock and clerks can't be equates to the same price digitally. I will pirate the heck out of them unless they do so. I got 3000 vinyl titles why should I repay them for content I own and no dload someone elses rip of the same title off the torrents?

Also, APple please give us an easy composer of .ite content off our own cd scans.

Otherwise this superb innovative feature, which to be honest should of been there already way back, will be a sham and just another way to triple buy the same music for a
us.
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