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Apple cracks top 20 global brands in survey

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
A new study shows that Apple significantly improved the value of its name brand in the last year, catapulting the brand to No. 20, ahead of companies like American Express, Pepsi and Nike.

The 2009 "Best Global Brands" study from BusinessWeek and Interbrand ranked the top 100 companies for the year. Apple's 2009 brand value was estimated at $15.4 billion, a 12 percent improvement over 2008 when the company took in spot No. 24. Apple's value has risen while other companies have struggled in the face of a global recession.

"The recession wont take a bite out of this Apple," the study said. "Declining Mac sales and fears for the companys future without brand visionary Steve Jobs, were outweighed by record high iPod sales, doubling sales for the iPod Touch, and all-time high market share for Mac OS software. Price might be a barrier for cost-conscious consumers, but Apple responded quickly with high margin, low-priced products like the US $99 iPhone and a new, voice-activated iPod Shuffle. The Apple brand is the most supported within its industry, and among the most iconic of relatively young brands in the world."

Like Apple, most of the top global brands are based in the U.S. Coca-Cola took top honors with a $68.7 billion value, followed by IBM ($60.2 billion), Microsoft ($56.6 billion), GE ($47.7 billion) and Finland-based Nokia ($34.8 billion). The Windows software maker dropped 4 percent from last year, but retained its No. 3 position. Coca-Cola has been the No. 1 brand for nine straight years.

Other noteworthy technology companies on the list include Google (7), Intel (9), Hewlett-Packard (11), Cisco (14), Samsung (19), Oracle (24), Sony (29), Canon (33), Dell (35) and Amazon (43).

The top gainers on the list were Google, Amazon and Zara. Falling the most was UBS, from 41 to 72. Banks and auto brands fared the worst, as Merrill Lynch and AIG both fell off the top 100 list.



"The recession has presented brand stewards with the most severe test of their careers," the study said. "Companies have had to adjust rapidly as consumers reexamine their purchases and rethink brand loyalties. Marketing executives are balancing the temptation to chase short-term gains with discounts and promotions against the risk of cheapening their brands over the long haul. Meanwhile, most have considerably smaller budgets with which to reach their customers."

Apple's branding often ranks high in similar surveys. Earlier this month, a report said that the Cupertino, Calif., company is the most admired in all of Asia.
post #2 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"The recession wont take a bite out of this Apple," the study said. "Declining Mac sales and fears for the companys future without brand visionary Steve Jobs, were outweighed by record high iPod sales, doubling sales for the iPod Touch, and all-time high market share for Mac OS software.

That last remark isn't true, though. They must mean "all-time high market share for Mac OS X". I seem to recall a time long ago when Macs had a 40+% share. Anyone else?
post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post

That last remark isn't true, though. They must mean "all-time high market share for Mac OS X". I seem to recall a time long ago when Macs had a 40+% share. Anyone else?

Yes. That was many moons ago. They likely mean OS X
post #4 of 25
Always glad to hear that Apple is making progress in growing the brand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post

That last remark isn't true, though. They must mean "all-time high market share for Mac OS X". I seem to recall a time long ago when Macs had a 40+% share. Anyone else?

I think most of the world has forgotten when they were last on top.
post #5 of 25
When I see IBM @ No. 2 I get confused.
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post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

When I see IBM @ No. 2 I get confused.

don't look at who's on number 3 or you'll get even more confused
post #7 of 25
I think this just demonstrates how broadly you can interpret the term 'brand value'. I don't doubt their reputation, but hardly anyone outside the tech business even knows what Oracle does, yet they are ranked ahead of Nike.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyourownthing View Post

don't look at who's on number 3 or you'll get even more confused

I noticed who's at No. 3, but unlike most her I refuse to play that game.
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post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel001 View Post

I think this just demonstrates how broadly you can interpret the term 'brand value'. I don't doubt their reputation, but hardly anyone outside the tech business even knows what Oracle does, yet they are ranked ahead of Nike.

You sort of said what I was going to. It's all a bit to vague frankly.
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post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel001 View Post

I think this just demonstrates how broadly you can interpret the term 'brand value'. I don't doubt their reputation, but hardly anyone outside the tech business even knows what Oracle does, yet they are ranked ahead of Nike.

You're exactly right. The value calculation methodology, done by a company called Interbrand is really quite opaque. I went through it carefully, but had trouble figuring it out.

More to the point, their "selection criteria" says:
01 There must be substantial publicly available financial data
02 The brand must have at least one-third of revenues outside of its country-of-origin
03 The brand must be a market-facing brand
04 The Economic Value Added (EVA) must be positive
05 The brand must not have a purely B2B single audience with no wider public profile and awareness


I have a hard time imagining that IBM and Oracle pass their own criterion #05? And, certainly during the 2008-09 period, many of the companies mentioned (e.g., Sony, Coca Cola, Samsung) would badly fail criterion #04?
post #11 of 25
Listen to the podcast, it says that, in the case of Coca Cola, all it makes is sugar water, so most of the value is in the brand..

In which case Apple should be lower in the ranking than say, Microsoft, if you rank the quality of their products?

Another interesting fact is that Apple is mentioned in a number of others' summaries, by name or product type. Microsoft is 'advertising against Apple' and Samsung is creating an App Store and Nokia is, and HP is... etc etc. Judging by that, Apple should be number one!


All just a bit of stuff and nonsense really.
post #12 of 25
Micro$ucks at #3 tells me that this survey measures nothing but name recognition.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

05 The brand must not have a purely B2B single audience with no wider public profile and awareness

I have a hard time imagining that IBM and Oracle pass their own criterion #05?

I don't know about Oracle but IBM sell a surprising amount of software to consumers.
post #14 of 25
Sugar water is #1? Isn't that what they use to clean crude oil of birds?
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubert View Post

Micro$ucks at #3 tells me that this survey measures nothing but name recognition.

To be fair having your computers over 80% of the words (computer) desks is a lot more than simply name recognition - though I get your point. This survey's results seem weird on the whole.
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post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post

Listen to the podcast, it says that, in the case of Coca Cola, all it makes is sugar water, so most of the value is in the brand..

In which case Apple should be lower in the ranking than say, Microsoft, if you rank the quality of their products?

Another interesting fact is that Apple is mentioned in a number of others' summaries, by name or product type. Microsoft is 'advertising against Apple' and Samsung is creating an App Store and Nokia is, and HP is... etc etc. Judging by that, Apple should be number one!


All just a bit of stuff and nonsense really.

I don't know about them being no.1, but number 20 seems pretty high.

Also, I don't buy the argument that all Coca Cola make is sugared water. It's like saying the majority of Nike's product are foot covers. Coca Cola tastes good, it's more than "only" branding.
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post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Sugar water is #1? Isn't that what they use to clean crude oil of birds?

That ain't sugar christopher - that's corn! It's what has given us our blimpie nation- high fructose corn syrup. Worse than cigarettes for your health. The main cause of all the health problems we have.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Sugar water is #1? Isn't that what they use to clean crude oil of birds?

That would be Dawn.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

That ain't sugar christopher - that's corn! It's what has given us our blimpie nation- high fructose corn syrup. Worse than cigarettes for your health. The main cause of all the health problems we have.

You're right! I forgot about corn syrup replacing sugar in Coke and a lot of other products, too.

I read obesity costs the US government $50/pound in health care costs!

If you want to solve the health care crisis.....put down that fork!

Welcome to the United States of Fried Food!
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Welcome to the United States of Fried Food!

Fried food! Where, where........
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Fried food! Where, where........

I heard a comedian talking about McDonald's and KFC and he said, 'Lets just skip a step and take my heart and deep fry it!'

PS. Sorry off topic!
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

I don't know about Oracle but IBM sell a surprising amount of software to consumers.

Exactly what software would that be? I found no consumer software here:

http://www-01.ibm.com/software/

I went to Amazon and Newegg and found no such IBM branded software. If IBM makes software under another brand, then it wouldn't count for helping IBM's brand recognition.
post #23 of 25
Brand value is different than brand recognition. As big as Apple is, they are still quite small in economic scale compared to Coke, IBM, and yes... Microsoft.

Apple ranks higher in brand satisfaction, which adds value to the company. But, can Apple ever (or does it want to) move into enterprise applications? Datacentres? MIS systems? These aren't sexy for consumers, but when when you start licensing millions of servers and their related wares... that is where big money is... big business. Apple might make $500 selling a Macbook, but Microsoft will make $2000 selling one SQL Server license. At my last workplace, our yearly donation to MS easily exceeded our IT capital expenditures... a nice little IBM 1U server? $700. Squirrely Server, Windows Server, backup software... easily 3-5 times that PER YEAR.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Exactly what software would that be? I found no consumer software here:

http://www-01.ibm.com/software/

I went to Amazon and Newegg and found no such IBM branded software. If IBM makes software under another brand, then it wouldn't count for helping IBM's brand recognition.

http://www-142.ibm.com/software/prod...atoz?pgel=lnav

It seems to be very specialized software, that has no audience via Amazon but by other means.

Take a look at that link above, it lists IBM's software offerings, which just by the title give away that it's your normal mpeg streamclip or gimp or even word.

Businesses are also consumers, in a way at least.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinnerlys View Post

Businesses are also consumers, in a way at least.

I understand why you might think that, but when classifying buyer groups, consumers and businesses are considered to be different sectors. Consumers in the economic sense are individuals and households. They usually have different needs and wants than a business would.
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