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post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
OK, in response to a thread in Future Hardware...

I do not know any "rules" but I am certain that you would NEVER say "Apple HAVE to..." or "Apple ARE." If you just think about it, it is really not hard. It is ONE company, singular. Just say Apple had three people:

You would say, inreferring to the group by their names instead of the company: "Steve J, Steve W and Jonathan I ARE employees of Apple Computer." But you would say "Jonathan I IS an employee..."

same for the company.

"Apple IS a computer manufacturer."
"Hewlet Packard IS " " " ."

Apple and HP ARE computer comapnies.

"Apple and HP HAVE to build computers."

etc...

Another one I see made ALL over the internet:

"I would rather shoot myself THEN use a computer running Windows," as opposed to "I would rather shoot myself THAN use a computer running Windows."
I think people thend to pronounce "THAN" as "THEN" and hence comfuse the two. This error runs ramanpt, as does the possesive example. I am an avid DVDer and often see "Fox ARE a good manufacturer" and Disney ARE a greedy company." or what have you.

Well like I said I do not know any rules, I just know. ANd I always got "A"s in English class. :o

It does not bother me, but this is just for anyone interested. If you have counter ideas please post, and if you can cite specific "rules" then please let me know.

Thanks!
post #2 of 35
Well since we're being picky...

it's Confuse... not comfuse <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />

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post #3 of 35
OK, what if a person had multiple personalities? It is a singular body with multiple personalities inhabiting the host. Would it be - "I am" or "I are".
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post #4 of 35
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by Mac Guru:
<strong>Well since we're being picky...

it's Confuse... not comfuse <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />

Mac Guru</strong><hr></blockquote>

There is a difference between misuse of grammar and a simple typo. <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />
And I am not being picky, I just wanted to chime in, and didn't feel it was worth taking the other thread off onto a tangent.
post #5 of 35
HF, actually, it depends on if you're speaking American English or British English. It is the convention among the limeys to use 'are' when talking about a group, even if the name of that group is a singular word. I worked with some British folks recently, and noticed that they did this without fail when referring to their own company, which was a man's name. And of course, it carried over into all such situations, both in conversation, and in formal written letters, memos, etc.

And, if you're bugged by the then/than misuse, what about your/you're? That's a very common mistake as well.

Or how about its/it's, or the use of an apostrophe for a plural, not a possessive, such as CD's or CD-ROM's?

To many of the young set here, it's an issue of being 'picky' I suppose. In the real world (after you get your edjakashun) such mistakes reveal its quality.

<img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />
post #6 of 35
Oh give it a rest. Some people are just ****ing stupid and never paid attention in school and mangle the language every chance they get.

Quit giving them a pass to do so.

Yes, typos are one thing. We all make them, especially in hastily typed message board posts and no spell checker.

But stuff like "there" and "their" and "two", "too" and "to"...ugh!

And "supposably".

Not typos, but genuine, God-awful misuse and mangling by people smart enough to own and operate a computer, but who obviously spent English class looking out the window at the parking lot or passing love notes.

I work with someone who's a VERY high-up manager type, with degrees and certificates and blah, blah, blah. And honest to God, I've heard her say things in a way that would do Beavis proud.

post #7 of 35
My biggest pet peeve is when people use the word:

irregardless

NO! Stop using that! It's not a legitimate word! My dad is especially bad with using it.

[ 12-24-2001: Message edited by: CosmoNut ]</p>
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post #8 of 35
Okay- here's one. Misuse of adverbs. I have a great friend who is highly educated and still keeps saying "I felt badly" for someone or another. It's "I feel/felt BAD" Otherwise it's akin to saying "I performed badly on that test" rather than "I felt bad that I ran over your foot"
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post #9 of 35


Grammarian usually has little to contribute to a discussion and possesses few effective weapons. To compensate, he will point out minor errors in spelling and grammar. Because of Grammarian's obvious weakness most Warriors ignore him.

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[ 12-24-2001: Message edited by: Sinewave ]</p>
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post #10 of 35
Sinewave doesn't understand simple subject/verb agreements. A great user of "they was" and "we was" and "your" instead of "you're" and vice versa.

You can tell how someone speaks in person by looking at how they communicate by other media.

Mistyping is fine. Hitting the N-key when you mean to hit the M-key is fine, they're right next to each other. But saying something like "they was" just shows how slow the mental processes must be in the brain telling the fingers to hit those keys.

Some call it nitpicking, I call it not being a moron.
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post #11 of 35
While I do prefer the American standard in this case, there *is* a gray area.

Think about it.

"The Manchester United are winning."
"The Manchester United is winning."
"The Manchested United team is winning."

Which one sounds the best? ... And it doesn't only apply to British teams.

"The San Francisco Giants team is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants are winning."

etc, etc.

It's not so clear cut.
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post #12 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by groverat:
<strong>Sinewave doesn't understand simple subject/verb agreements. A great user of "they was" and "we was" and "your" instead of "you're" and vice versa.
<hr></blockquote></strong> Actually I don't pay attention to such things in internet forums. Where the main objective is getting your point across. Not grading for grammar usage.
[quote]<strong>
You can tell how someone speaks in person by looking at how they communicate by other media.<hr></blockquote></strong>
Not true.
[quote]<strong>
Mistyping is fine. Hitting the N-key when you mean to hit the M-key is fine, they're right next to each other. But saying something like "they was" just shows how slow the mental processes must be in the brain telling the fingers to hit those keys.
<hr></blockquote></strong>

[quote]<strong>
Some call it nitpicking, I call it not being a moron.</strong><hr></blockquote>
I call it being a grammar nazi. Esp when being used as a personal attack during a long debate when your losing
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post #13 of 35
When people are rediculous it bugs me.

Or when they say they are ambivalent because they don't care, it bugs me. Ambivalence means you have strong feelings towards both sides. Being ambivalent does not mean you don't care!

ambi - both
valent - strong

rediculous.
post #14 of 35
[quote]Okay I am going to write about my favorite group of all time wich is The Beatles and you will leern stuff like you always do wich is cool. My all time favorite group use to be Milli Vanilla but when I was told that they did not sing and they did not even have reel hair that threw me for a loop and so The Beatles are my favorute group becauze they sung there own songs and had there own hair. The only other group I love lots is the Rolling Stones but Keith Richerds is ugly and old and Mick Jaggar has lips bigger than a bread box. Oh yeah he is also old and ugly.

My favorite Beatles songs are Love Me Do, She Loves You, Hey Jude, Yesterday and Smoke On The Water. Now we will meet The Beatles individualy one by one.Â*

Ringo Starr is the drummer and most drummers of coarse are either dead or only have one foot but Ringo is not dead and has both feet becauze I have seen them both. He does not sing much in The Beatles becauze he sings like my Uncle Lenny wich is not good. Trust me becauze I would lie to you.

George Harison plays the guitar and he sings some good songs like When My Guitar Gently Wepts and Something and Here Comes My Son and he also sings the yeah yeah yeah part in She Loves You wich is cool.Â*

Paul MCcartney plays the base thing and he wroted awesume songs like Elenor Rugby, Yesterday, Hey Jude and one other one where he screems good. He is really really cute but that is gay to say becauze it is gay to say that so I will not say that. He is even better looking than my girlfrend Trish and she is a eye sore!

Last but not last is the one and only John Lennon who played guitar and he sung the best in my humble opium and his songs were unforgetable and the best ones were Come Together and lots more but I forget the names of them right now.Â*

I almost forgot the history of The Beatles and so I will tell you in digested form becauze I am running out of words.

The Beatles formed and got together in 1957 give or take a yeer or two. There originel drummer was Pete Best but he was kicked out becauze his drumming sucked big time and Ringo was the Best not Pete. That was a word on plays ha ha!

The Beatles broke up in 1969 when they were singing the song Helter Skelter and they were playing it to fast and Ringo got mad and yelled I GOT BLISTERS ON MY FINGERS becauze he was drumming to hard and fast and he quitted the group and then they broke up becauze The Beatles without drums sucked big time.

I just heard the group The Monkeys on the radio and I remembered that they are my favorite group not The Beatles so forget what I said about The Beatles up there.Â*

The Monkeys are awesume. Mickey Doolenz is the drummer and he sings Last Train To Something and Peter Tork plays the base thing and he does not sing much thank God and Mike Nezmith is the guitar player and he sings lots of country songs but they do not make me throw up wich is good and Davy Jones is multitalented on the tamborine thing. Oh yeah and he is very very cute.

Here is a short history of The Monkeys. They were just a tv show way back in 1965 wich was called the roaring thirtys I think. They did not play the music on there records but later on they did and then they broke up around 1970. Maybe that was to short but Baywatch is on tv now so good bye.
Â*

Your frend,
Gus Shultz <hr></blockquote>

From <a href="http://gusshultz.0me.com/gusbeatles.htm" target="_blank">http://gusshultz.0me.com/gusbeatles.htm</a>

post #15 of 35
Oh yeah. Almost forget.

When speaking to people...

What is the deal with people who put "R"s in words that don't have "R"s in them?

You know, people who say "Warsh" instead of "Wash". Or "Dater" instead of "Data".

Why the hell do people do that?

I dated a girl once who said warsh. I gave her a hard time about it. Then I met her family and they all said warsh too. Hell, they almost had me saying it after a while.

I broke up with her. Took it as a sign of things to come. Guess you could say I warshed my hands of her. *bleh*
post #16 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by seb:
<strong>Oh yeah. Almost forget.

When speaking to people...

What is the deal with people who put "R"s in words that don't have "R"s in them?

You know, people who say "Warsh" instead of "Wash". Or "Dater" instead of "Data".

Why the hell do people do that?

I dated a girl once who said warsh. I gave her a hard time about it. Then I met her family and they all said warsh too. Hell, they almost had me saying it after a while.

I broke up with her. Took it as a sign of things to come. Guess you could say I warshed my hands of her. *bleh*</strong><hr></blockquote>

It's called a accent
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post #17 of 35
hmm... maybe.

Sorta like the soprano wannabes here in NYC who say tree instead of three.
post #18 of 35
Poor grammar - just like substituting u, r, or 2 in place of the proper word - is just plain lazy. I simply don't understand why people think the rules of written language don't apply to a medium which is fundamentally based on the written language.

<img src="confused.gif" border="0">
post #19 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by seb:
<strong>hmm... maybe.

Sorta like the soprano wannabes here in NYC who say tree instead of three.</strong><hr></blockquote>

You mean Brooklyners, er, Brooklynites, screw it, people who live in Brooklyn?
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post #20 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by beer:
<strong>Poor grammar - just like substituting u, r, or 2 in place of the proper word - is just plain lazy. I simply don't understand why people think the rules of written language don't apply to a medium which is fundamentally based on the written language.

:confused: </strong><hr></blockquote>

That's what I absolutely hate! It all started with those signs people make..."Wood 4 Sale!" and stuff. Damn annoying.
post #21 of 35
"I call it being a grammar nazi. Esp when being used as a personal attack during a long debate when your losing"

I do it before I smoke you, while I'm smoking you and after I'm done smoking you. It drives me absolutely insane.

Here is the problem:
When you're (&lt;-- look, "you & are" combined properly!) involved in a debate with someone and you say things like "they was" it is almost impossible to take anything you say seriously.

It throws my concentration off and it makes me wonder if I am debating with a middle school student or someone who is older and just not able to use semi-proper English.

It's almost disrespectful to those you're speaking to, it's like showing up at a job interview in houseshoes and a ratty bathrobe.
("What does it matter? I'm here ain't I? Your just stoopid!")

My father's dog can get his point across, sinewave, and I'm sure he has a greater mastery of Doggiespeak than you do of our fair language.
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post #22 of 35
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by groverat:
<strong>Sinewave doesn't understand simple subject/verb agreements. A great user of "they was" and "we was" and "your" instead of "you're" and vice versa.

You can tell how someone speaks in person by looking at how they communicate by other media.

Mistyping is fine. Hitting the N-key when you mean to hit the M-key is fine, they're right next to each other. But saying something like "they was" just shows how slow the mental processes must be in the brain telling the fingers to hit those keys.

Some call it nitpicking, I call it not being a moron.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Thanks for backing me up on the typo mini-debate. I was not exactly writing my dissertation there. Subject-verb agreement, keeping tenses in order, etc. are a lot less forgiving than some of the common errors I make becasue I type fast, like writing "coMfuse" as opposed to "coNfuse," capitalizing the first two letters of a word becasue I hold the shift key a fraction of a second too long, or, for example, typing "don;t" as opposed to "don't ." For some reason my finger just never reaches far enough to get the apostraphe but it seems to like that semicolon

Thanks for clearing up the British use issue. I did not know that. It still bugs me but if that is their proper way, I have no qualms about it.

Oh, one more. "Can not" is one word, "cannot." That is another one I see rampant on the internet.

I am not flaming anyone (or is it anybody? :cool: ) LOL that is one I always mess up, like do I "lie" down or do I "lay" down? Anyone know?
Anyway, I am not flaming anyone like I said, but just trying to be helpful, and if you take it any other way than accept it as the constructive criticism it is then I am sorry.
post #23 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by groverat:
<strong>I do it before I smoke you, while I'm smoking you and after I'm done smoking you. It drives me absolutely insane.<hr></blockquote></strong>
You've never smoked me son. As a matter of fact in all our discussions on here your the one being roach clipped
[quote]<strong>
Here is the problem:
When you're (&lt;-- look, "you & are" combined properly!) involved in a debate with someone and you say things like "they was" it is almost impossible to take anything you say seriously.<hr></blockquote></strong>
Your, you're, they was, they are again the point I was trying to get across got across. you just like to point out silly things that have no bearing on the argument to justify you being right.
[quote]<strong>
It throws my concentration off and it makes me wonder if I am debating with a middle school student or someone who is older and just not able to use semi-proper English.
<hr></blockquote></strong>

[quote]<strong>
It's almost disrespectful to those you're speaking to, it's like showing up at a job interview in houseshoes and a ratty bathrobe.
("What does it matter? I'm here ain't I? Your just stoopid!")
<hr></blockquote></strong>
Well to get respect you have to earn it no? So far you haven't done anything to earn my respect. Guess what.. when I email my girlfriend I make sure all my Ps and Qs are crossed.
[quote]<strong>
My father's dog can get his point across, sinewave, and I'm sure he has a greater mastery of Doggiespeak than you do of our fair language.</strong><hr></blockquote>
Yeah grover.. again your debates when losing center around personal attacks. I have enough self respect to stay away from such things most of the time. You tend to gravitate towards them thinking it will somehow discredit me and make you look in the "know".
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post #24 of 35
More misspellings: wierd, seperate, desparate, relevent, definate, grammer, arguement, genious, basicly, beleive, adress, dilema, suprise, legitamate, etc.

There's a difference between making an occasional typo and making the same mistakes all the time...
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post #25 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by Eugene:
<strong>While I do prefer the American standard in this case, there *is* a gray area.

Think about it.

"The Manchester United are winning."
"The Manchester United is winning."
"The Manchested United team is winning."

Which one sounds the best? ... And it doesn't only apply to British teams.

"The San Francisco Giants team is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants are winning."

etc, etc.

It's not so clear cut.</strong><hr></blockquote>


Well, Eugene, if the question is which one sounds the best, I think it is clear cut. Use is following a word that is singular, use are following a word that is plural, regardless of whether the entity being referred to is an individual or a group of individuals. If the question is which way is correct, it becomes a little fuzzy to me too.

Think about how we apply/misapply the rule to the verb "to be".
In plural form: they were, you were (you being a group)
In singular form: I was, he was, she was, you were
See the problem? If you apply the rule strictly, the last one is wrong. It should be "you was" because in this case "you" is an individual. I couldn't resist using you is in a sentence, but once again, that fits the rule for singular usage.
They are, you are...
I am, he is, she is, you is (not you are)

The solution might be to take up another language.


Gregg

[ 12-26-2001: Message edited by: Gregg ]</p>
post #26 of 35
But this is not a special condition. This is a third person subject. And in my examples, the versions that look right are different.

See, it's "The United" and somebody has decided to use an adjective as a noun...that screws everything up.
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post #27 of 35
Doesn't the use of an adjective as a noun make it a special condition? That's a good angle. I have to admit I missed that, since I was focused on the singular/plural aspect.

I would bring up another common misuse, except I'm not sure who would accept it, so I won't.
post #28 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by Eugene:
<strong>While I do prefer the American standard in this case, there *is* a gray area.

Think about it.

"The Manchester United are winning."
"The Manchester United is winning."
"The Manchested United team is winning."

Which one sounds the best? ... And it doesn't only apply to British teams.

"The San Francisco Giants team is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants is winning."
"The San Francisco Giants are winning."

etc, etc.

It's not so clear cut.</strong><hr></blockquote>

The Manchester United? It's just Manchester United - it's a team name. And I'd still say Manchester United are winning.

post #29 of 35
Amorya, that makes the mistake even more glaring then...Think about it...

In American English:
"What team is winning?"
"Manchester United is"

vs

British English:
"Manchester United are"

One other thing, in British English, would you say, "What team are winning?"
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post #30 of 35
allow me to preface my remarks by stating that i learned nearly all the english grammar i know via conversational context and bazooka-joe comics. i missed a lot of what the fifth grade had to offer after we gave our teacher a nervous breakdown.

that being said;

One entry found for irregardless.


Main Entrytir·re·gard·less
Pronunciationt"ir-i-'gärd-l&s
Functiontadverb
Etymologytprobably blend of irrespective and regardless
Datetcirca 1912
nonstandard : REGARDLESS
usage Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its fairly widespread use in speech called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.
=============================

Re: Ambivalence ;

"Ambivalent" is one of those words that doesn't sound like what it is.
a virtual diametric contradiction unto itself.


as per the additional mystery "R" in non-R words:
oil=earl
yikes! what's up with that?


i am a victim of the "'s" syndrome when it comes to the word "it" and the abbreviation "CD". i am working on it but its tough sometimes.


microsoft office has both a spell checker and a grammar checker built into it.

i might start using the evil suite more just to bone up.
post #31 of 35
killboy, have ya got somthin' against Capitol letters? Or is it capital? There's a principal there somewhere. Or is it principle? This thread is just making me cornfused. :confused:

Might as well throw in another one. Hate it when the word "their" is used when it should be he, or she, or he or she, or his, or her, or his or her. Not to mention there or they're. <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />
post #32 of 35
My biggest pet peeve is the use of the phrase "I could care less".

I have tried to explain this to my mother-in-law several times, and she just doesn't get it.

I tell her "If you 'could care less', then you must care about it a little bit.".

She comes back with "No, I don't, I could care less about it!"



I couldn't care less. There, that isn't so hard to understand is it?! I care so little about it that I couldn't possible care any less! Makes sense to me.

I also can't stand seeing someone write "I was gunna do that too."
post #33 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by MacAgent:
<strong>

From <a href="http://gusshultz.0me.com/gusbeatles.htm" target="_blank">http://gusshultz.0me.com/gusbeatles.htm</a>

</strong><hr></blockquote>
kewl post glad thanks for taking the thyme
post #34 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by murbot:
<strong>My biggest pet peeve is the use of the phrase "I could care less". I have tried to explain this to my mother-in-law several times, and she just doesn't get it. I tell her "If you 'could care less', then you must care about it a little bit.". She comes back with "No, I don't, I could care less about it!"

I couldn't care less. There, that isn't so hard to understand is it?! I care so little about it that I couldn't possible care any less! Makes sense to me.

I also can't stand seeing someone write "I was gunna do that too." </strong><hr></blockquote>

murbot,
man i know what you mean! "Couldn't" and "gonna", how hard is that..er, are they?
post #35 of 35
[quote]Originally posted by Eugene:
<strong>Amorya, that makes the mistake even more glaring then...Think about it...

In American English:
"What team is winning?"
"Manchester United is"

vs

British English:
"Manchester United are"

One other thing, in British English, would you say, "What team are winning?"</strong><hr></blockquote>

No, I'd say "which team is winning?", because you're talking about teams. but when talking about a particular team, I'd use the plural. Not that I'm an expert at British grammar

Now I think about it, I'd accept both is or are for a team. Probably all the American influence we get over here. If I was speaking, it'd be Apple have released a new G5, not Apple has released a new G5. But I wouldn't really notice if someone said the other.
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