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Evidence points to new MacBook Pros on horizon - Page 2

post #41 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drow_Swordsman View Post

A much needed update - though I'd be surprised if the i5 or i7's get in the MBP's, I'm thinking it'll be the Xeon's.

There are no notebook xeon and I don't think Apple is going to pack on an extra half to three quarters of an inch and cut battery time to nothing to use them.
post #42 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isomorphic View Post

Great. New MacBook Pros. The question is: When? January?

Seriously! I was wondering whether or not the current line of MBPs would be replaced any time soon, so I thought to hold off. Now that I know that a new one is likely in the works, it'll be a crazy wait.
post #43 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperscribble View Post

Seriously! I was wondering whether or not the current line of MBPs would be replaced any time soon, so I thought to hold off. Now that I know that a new one is likely in the works, it'll be a crazy wait.

I think it'll pop-up sometime in November alongside the quad-core iMacs.
post #44 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by astrosmash View Post

There are always new MacBook Pros on the horizon.

indeed

but actually you could just say 'there are always new macs on the horizon'

after all we still don't have that must have blu-ray in our machines or that [b]must have [/b/] matte screen. so how long until the rumors start of new machines with those
post #45 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

indeed

but actually you could just say 'there are always new macs on the horizon'

after all we still don't have that must have blu-ray in our machines or that [b]must have [/b/] matte screen. so how long until the rumors start of new machines with those

i kind of want macbook pros to have blu ray because i'm tired of people complaining it on this forum about it
post #46 of 134
Ooooh yea ... i love macbook pros
currently using a silver keys penryn 2.5 with the 512MB video card ... i love it the only issue weight factor ... i am using a 13inch latitude dell in school more and i leave my mbp on the desk ... it sucks not to be able to carry it everywhere
post #47 of 134
Do the soon-to-be updated MBPs include the 13 inch model? I just got one, so I'm anxious to find out if I should be returning it and waiting for the upgrade.
post #48 of 134
*hoping for a curvy enclosure a la new MacBook*

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post #49 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The mobile C2Q and mobile i7s both run at 45W. The current C2Ds are 35W. But dont the i7s integrate a chip that uses 8W(?) thereby making them a solid upgrade option for notebooks while keeping within similar TDP?

Maybe but Apple's notebooks are so thin I reckon they'll wait for Arrandale.
post #50 of 134
at the very least Apple should update the MBA with the one piece glass track pad and the black border around the screen! That's the only thing holding me back on a purchase...that and the price, of course!
post #51 of 134
I'm new to all this, but something tells me that it is something for next year.

Usually, Apple stops taking orders for old models ("your order will be served in 4 weeks") when new ones are about to come out. What if the next MacBook Pro's are upgrade models? More disk, more memory or going from 2.26 GHz to 2.53 GHz for the same processor? Then, it could be something for now.

P.S.: Do I wish that they released something new for the end of the year. I'm on the market for a new laptop (my previous one broke down) and I'm not happy about the current MacBook Pro models (not enough computing power...) I hope I won't have to wait to buy a MacBook now only to see a better MacBook Pro on the shelves in two, three months.
post #52 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by TroubleStarter View Post

I'm new to all this, but something tells me that it is something for next year.

Usually, Apple stops taking orders for old models ("your order will be served in 4 weeks") when new ones are about to come out. What if the next MacBook Pro's are upgrade models? More disk, more memory or going from 2.26 GHz to 2.53 GHz for the same processor?

The reason speculation is tending toward a redesign rather than a refresh is that Apple has bumped the major revision number on the parts. The current series of MBPs are 5.x, with x currently being 5. The next ones are 6.1 and 6.1b. If this were a minor refresh we'd be seeing 5.6 as a version number rather than 6.1.

Of course, what Apple considers a "major revision" is up for debate. It might simply mean a new motherboard for the new Intel CPUs and chipsets, with everything else largely unchanged. Or, it could mean that they started with a blank sheet of paper.
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post #53 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amorph View Post

The reason speculation is tending toward a redesign rather than a refresh is that Apple has bumped the major revision number on the parts. The current series of MBPs are 5.x, with x currently being 5. The next ones are 6.1 and 6.1b. If this were a minor refresh we'd be seeing 5.6 as a version number rather than 6.1.

Of course, what Apple considers a "major revision" is up for debate. It might simply mean a new motherboard for the new Intel CPUs and chipsets, with everything else largely unchanged. Or, it could mean that they started with a blank sheet of paper.

The unibody MBP is barely over a year old for 15", the 17" unibody was introduced early this year, and they might already be doing a major design change? They didn't change things that drastically when they had the stamped aluminum housing. I suppose the new design being a series of programs rather than a die makes that easier, but that's quite a shift.

If I had a guess, it's probably a board change, but it's possible to have a major case change.
post #54 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by macologist View Post

Hope Ant-Glare - Matte Screen never goes away

It won't. It's just returned this year after Apple saw the error of their ways.
Please improve the iSight camera- one of the worse on the market for a Pro computer, make no sense for HD 16:9 display to have such a weak camera. And what is it still doing in the new 27" iMac for that matter? The new iMacs needs better cameras.
post #55 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by drumrobot View Post

Do the soon-to-be updated MBPs include the 13 inch model? I just got one, so I'm anxious to find out if I should be returning it and waiting for the upgrade.

The specs on the new white Macboook basically match the 13" Pro now, which costs $200 more. Expect the 13" Pro to get a major refresh to differentiate from the whiteBook. I would return it.
post #56 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to the report, all indications point to two new MacBook Pros with Quad Core Mobile processors and ATI series 4500 GPUs.

So the rest would use bumped Penryns? Not surprising given what happened with the iMac. Going from the iMac I would expect only the top two to get Clarksfield.
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post #57 of 134
Cool, I hope they now come with 8 GB of RAM in default config (one can always dream ).

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

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Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

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post #58 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario View Post

Cool, I hope they now come with 8 GB of RAM in default config (one can always dream ).

Dream? That is just a matter of time, not dreaming. Probably a year or two.
post #59 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. K View Post

Why the suggestion of the Radeon 4500s? That's a step sideways if not backwards. If the new MBPs are going the ATI graphics route, They should be using the midrange 5500/5600 series (which should be out by the time the refresh happens). Or, hell with it, a 4670.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ltcommander.data View Post

Normally I'm a supporter of ATI, especially with them on a role since the HD4000 series, but please no. Despite the ever creative marketing names the Mobility HD4500 series is not a mid-range GPU, but a low-end GPU. Even the fastest, HD 4570 is slower than the 9600M GT.

I hate to cut your great post short, but you were not comparing Apples to Apples ('scuse pun). The integrated chipset is the only place nVidia is having the issue with i7, so this is the 9400m in the current MacBooks and MBPs. So the HD4500, if used at all which I doubt, would replace the 9400m, not the 9600M GT.

My guess is that either the MBP will run with an Intel chipset on low power, and continue with the nVidia chipset (probably a 260M @ 38 TDP) as the descreet solution, on performance mode.

Of course, this is all assuming they even go with the i7/i5 chipsets.

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post #60 of 134
Should we be expecting these before or after christmas?
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post #61 of 134
I disagree with this article. I don't think there are new Macbook Pros on the horizon.

I think Stevie has something totally new up his sleeve that will render all Macbook Pros obsolete. Some sort of hologram tablet that he developed when he owned NeXT with a touchscreen, single button interface which is a actually cheaper than a max-75 user Asus mini-server, when you figure you can have up to 100 users logged in at a time via holograms. I believe it will come in black, and will be exclusively available with a subscription to AT&T, because OS/11 will be included, and OS/11 is actually a telephone, not an operating system. There will be an all-new BLUETOOTH bezel, no support for FLAC, and glossy screen only, thanks.
post #62 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperscribble View Post

Seriously! I was wondering whether or not the current line of MBPs would be replaced any time soon, so I thought to hold off. Now that I know that a new one is likely in the works, it'll be a crazy wait.

Yea, I'm thinking of replacing my first-gen Core Duo MacBook (summer '06) within a few months. I guess this will be good timing for me, since I'd like to wait for a few more paychecks! If it comes out in November, I don't think I'd be able to resist!
post #63 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr O View Post

Yes, it seems to be too early for a refresh.

However, a release right before the shopping season will give the MBpros enough time to shine before the much anticipated Tablets will be announced in January 2010?!

They refreshed the MB three times in 9 months. They refreshed the Mini twice in 9 months.

Could be there are just stepping up their game a bit and keeping with Intel's faster pace of late.
post #64 of 134
Arguing about processor Wattage is pointless. First of all, TDP is a meaningless number for us, the end-users. Second, everyone who says Apple can't put a 45W processor in the Macbook Pro would have said 'Apple can't put a 95W processor in the iMac' a week ago, which makes them even less worth listening to now.

Only Apple's hardware engineers know what the restrictions of their chassis and cooling designs are.
post #65 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Arguing about processor Wattage is pointless. First of all, TDP is a meaningless number for us, the end-users.

Wrong. Lower power means longer-lasting batteries and cooler running machines.

When the first plastic MacBooks came out, I had an original PowerBook G4 that was five years old and in need of replacement. I knew the Core Duo in the MacBook would mean poor battery and heat performance, but I couldn't take the slowness of my G4 anymore. You know what? I was right, the battery life sucked and the fan went full blast for anything above about 10% CPU usage. I waited for the MacBook Pro to have a 25 W CPU before upgrading, and I'm glad I did. With the dedicated graphics turned off, the fan never comes on and I get better battery life than the MacBook despite a similar Watt-hour rating of the battery, more CPU performance, much more GPU performance and a larger display.

Could a 45 W CPU go in the MacBook Pro? Probably. But that MacBook Pro would have worse battery life and get hotter than the current one, there's no way around that.
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post #66 of 134
Someday we'll see quad-core MBPs, but not until Intel ship quad-core notebook CPUs built on a 32nm process at the end of 2010.
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post #67 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Arguing about processor Wattage is pointless. First of all, TDP is a meaningless number for us, the end-users. Second, everyone who says Apple can't put a 45W processor in the Macbook Pro would have said 'Apple can't put a 95W processor in the iMac' a week ago, which makes them even less worth listening to now.

Only Apple's hardware engineers know what the restrictions of their chassis and cooling designs are.

I think most of us would have implied a caveat that there would have to be some unique design change to allow for the better cooling. Like the use of that patent for better passive air flow or a thicker case.

I cant prove it, but Id wager a good part of the iMacs ability to get more desktop-class components is the use a 16:9 display which increases the case x and y area, while also lengthening the horizontal plane and shrinking the vertical plane, even over the smaller 20 iMac. The 27 iMac looks to have been an easy work for their engineering with plenty of room to play with. Im also told the aluminium backing over the plastic will help reduce heat, but I havent looked at how it sits relative to the components.
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post #68 of 134
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Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Wrong. Lower power means longer-lasting batteries and cooler running machines.

When the first plastic MacBooks came out, I had an original PowerBook G4 that was five years old and in need of replacement. I knew the Core Duo in the MacBook would mean poor battery and heat performance, but I couldn't take the slowness of my G4 anymore. You know what? I was right, the battery life sucked and the fan went full blast for anything above about 10% CPU usage. I waited for the MacBook Pro to have a 25 W CPU before upgrading, and I'm glad I did. With the dedicated graphics turned off, the fan never comes on and I get better battery life than the MacBook despite a similar Watt-hour rating of the battery, more CPU performance, much more GPU performance and a larger display.

Could a 45 W CPU go in the MacBook Pro? Probably. But that MacBook Pro would have worse battery life and get hotter than the current one, there's no way around that.

No.

You are all using TDP as if it is a definitive number: This processor uses X Watts. That is not true. TDP defines the top of a heat-output range that a processor is guaranteed not to exceed, and it only matters to engineers designing a cooling system for said processor. Heat output is related to power consumption, but you cannot use it that way.
post #69 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

TDP defines the top of a heat-output range that a processor is guaranteed not to exceed

Wrong. From the i7 data sheet, page 50:

"TDP is not the absolute worst case power of the processor."

TDP is actually "the expected maximum power generated while running realistic, worst case applications".

Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

You are all using TDP as if it is a definitive number: This processor uses X Watts. That is not true.

Whilst you are correct that a CPU rated at "45 W TDP" will not use 45 W all the time, you equally cannot simply ignore the difference between 25 W and 45 W TDP. The 25 W part will run cooler and it will give you better battery life.

Using a 45 W part is highly likely to cause a laptop to run hotter overall, and to have to have the fan running a lot more often than a 25 W part in the same case.
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post #70 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcarling View Post

Someday we'll see quad-core MBPs, but not until Intel ship quad-core notebook CPUs built on a 32nm process at the end of 2010.

Isn't that about the same time that Intel Lightpeak will be added as well. I'll probably hold out until
next fall before upgrading my 1.67ghz powerbook 17". By then I hope it would be reasonable to
expect a quad-core macbook pro with USB3, lightpeak, & a blu-ray burner. I missed out on the
Intel Macbook Pro by a couple of months (I'm still kicking myself about that). So I'm gonna wait it
out so I don't miss out on the new technology.
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post #71 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

By then I hope it would be reasonable to
expect a quad-core macbook pro with USB3, lightpeak, & a blu-ray burner.

USB 3.0: maybe, Blu-ray: I hope so but it looks like Steve really doesn't like it, lightpeak: no way.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

So I'm gonna wait it out so I don't miss out on the new technology.

The thing is, if you wait so as to not "miss out on the new technology", you'll be waiting forever. There's always so bit of new technology around the corner. Probably by the time we've got lightpeak, it'll be 3D displays that are just around the corner.
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post #72 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Wrong. From the i7 data sheet, page 50:

"TDP is not the absolute worst case power of the processor."

TDP is actually "the expected maximum power generated while running realistic, worst case applications".

You got me there, I see that Intel uses TDP differently from other companies, presumably to make their chips look better.

Quote:
Whilst you are correct that a CPU rated at "45 W TDP" will not use 45 W all the time, you equally cannot simply ignore the difference between 25 W and 45 W TDP. The 25 W part will run cooler and it will give you better battery life.

Using a 45 W part is highly likely to cause a laptop to run hotter overall, and to have to have the fan running a lot more often than a 25 W part in the same case.

And a notebook with a 45W processor is not necessarily going to have shorter battery life than one with a 25W processor. You're greatly oversimplifying things. Most peoples' usage, especially on battery power, is not going to push their processor out of its low-power idle state.

All processors underclock themselves when idle, but these i7 mobile chips have the ability to underclock individual cores that are not being used. The power-saving features actually got quite an overhaul over Core 2. On top of that, the separate Northbridge chip is now gone, its 15 or so Watt TDP folded into the processor. And the i7 can underclock that, too.

Of course you probably run your notebook at 100% load all the time. I feel sorry for your lap.
post #73 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

You're greatly oversimplifying things.

And you're not?

It's simple. I'm saying if you take a laptop and put in a CPU with 80% higher TDP, I reckon it'll run hotter and/or have to run its fan a lot more often/at a higher RPM, and probably give you worse battery life. I'm not saying it's going to be 80% hotter or give 80% lower battery life, just that the difference between the two can't be dismissed as "negligible".

Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Most peoples' usage, especially on battery power, is not going to push their processor out of its low-power idle state.

You do know the CPU doesn't execute any instructions whilst in the idle states? The Core 2 Duo has four different low-power states numbered C1 to C4, each successive state takes longer to enter/exit, but the power savings are greater at each step. Presumably, state C4 is entered when a Mac goes to sleep, during normal operation, the CPU will be constantly switching between the C0 (normal), C1, C2 and C3 states. I don't know the intricate details of OS X's power management (e.g. the required conditions to enter each state), but if you do I'd be very interested to know about them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

these i7 mobile chips have the ability to underclock individual cores that are not being used. The power-saving features actually got quite an overhaul over Core 2.

I've read this assertion in various places, but looking at the data sheets (Core 2 Duo, Core i7) I don't see any radical differences.

According to table 1 of the Core 2 Duo datasheet, if both cores are in the C3 state, this is referred to as "deep sleep", which according to table 22 results in a power consumption of 2.9 W.

For the Core i7 with both cores in the C3 state, the power consumption is 13 W (presumably, some of that is the memory controller; for comparison the X9100 Core 2 Duo which has a 44 W TDP has a deep sleep power consumption of 8.2 W and the "T" series Core 2 Duos have a deep sleep of 5.5 W).

Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

On top of that, the separate Northbridge chip is now gone, its 15 or so Watt TDP folded into the processor.

Yes, the Northbridge is gone, but a Southbridge would be needed, as would a dedicated GPU. In the current MBP with the dedicated graphics chip turned off, it's essentially CPU+9400M, but with the system as proposed in the AI article, you're looking at CPU+Southbridge+dedicated ATI GPU.

Apparently the 9400M has a 14 W TDP, so the MBP would be going from 25 W + 14 W TDP = 39 W TDP to 45 + ~5 + ~25 = ~75 W TDP.

You're really telling me that we can just ignore an almost doubling of TDP?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Of course you probably run your notebook at 100% load all the time. I feel sorry for your lap.

Not at all. With the plastic MacBook (Core Duo), I just had to think about visiting a website with flash and the fans would go ballistic. Now I can watch HD video on iPlayer without my fans going crazy on my MBP with "P" Core 2 Duo and 9400M.
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post #74 of 134
In your whole discussion you are missing one important question.
Getting a Clarksfield into the 17" MBP is not so much a question of feasibility as it is of reasonability.
If you look at the HP Envy I am pretty sure the 17" cooling system could if slightly tweaked cool a clarksfield. But it would definitely run hotter as due to the Turbo mode the 45 Watt are far more often reached and due to the overall increase in TDP. Thus it would probably not stay a very quiet Notebook.
Second and more important there is currently no onboad GPU for clarksfield in Intels Roadmap and Nvidia as canceld there whole chipset division. So without onboard GPUs the battery life will suffer considerably and if you look at current Capella offerings, the Battery runtimes are nowhere near those of montevina with P Series CPUs. Thus the 17" Battery life would go down significantly.
I think it might be possible that a clarksfield 17" Model appears but I wouldn't buy it. The smaller model will definitely be Arrendale only, because people want battery life.

And don't complain so much about the upcoming Intel G55. It will be twice as fast as the G45 according to intel (which is almost 9400M level), much more Power efficient(than both G45 or 9400M), can handle two h264 decodes simultaniously and has definitely enough Power for everything in 2D.

Before Arrendale nothing makes sense. Clarksfield only really makes sense in Desktop REplacements. I just hope Apple sticks to 16:10. I hate this 16:9 displays.
post #75 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by dusk View Post

In your whole discussion you are missing one important question.
Getting a Clarksfield into the 17" MBP is not so much a question of feasibility as it is of reasonability.
If you look at the HP Envy I am pretty sure the 17" cooling system could if slightly tweaked cool a clarksfield. But it would definitely run hotter as due to the Turbo mode the 45 Watt are far more often reached and due to the overall increase in TDP. Thus it would probably not stay a very quiet Notebook.
Second and more important there is currently no onboad GPU for clarksfield in Intels Roadmap and Nvidia as canceld there whole chipset division. So without onboard GPUs the battery life will suffer considerably and if you look at current Capella offerings, the Battery runtimes are nowhere near those of montevina with P Series CPUs. Thus the 17" Battery life would go down significantly.
I think it might be possible that a clarksfield 17" Model appears but I wouldn't buy it. The smaller model will definitely be Arrendale only, because people want battery life.

And don't complain so much about the upcoming Intel G55. It will be twice as fast as the G45 according to intel (which is almost 9400M level), much more Power efficient(than both G45 or 9400M), can handle two h264 decodes simultaniously and has definitely enough Power for everything in 2D.

Before Arrendale nothing makes sense. Clarksfield only really makes sense in Desktop REplacements. I just hope Apple sticks to 16:10. I hate this 16:9 displays.

Well said.
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post #76 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by utsava View Post

I think it'll pop-up sometime in November alongside the quad-core iMacs.

NO WAY! Your dreaming if you think Apple is going to do another update round before Christmas. Look for it first quarter next year after the mobile processor situation with Intel clears up.
post #77 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

Isn't that about the same time that Intel Lightpeak will be added as well.

That might be optimistic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

I'll probably hold out until next fall before upgrading my 1.67ghz powerbook 17".

You're maxed out at 2GB of ram, right? If I were you, I would buy when the Arrandale-based MBPs are released. The benefits of 4GB, Snow Leopard, 1920x1200, etc. are too good to wait yet another year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

By then I hope it would be reasonable to expect a quad-core macbook pro with USB3, lightpeak, & a blu-ray burner.

You are optimistic! :-)
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post #78 of 134
Another possibility. Why Clarksfield when it is clearly not intended for slim laptop designs? Apple has done it before: scooped up the earliest batches in a new range of Intel processors. If I understand the news correctly, Arrandale has gone to production on Sept 14. And major product launch will be early 2010 prob January. So, it makes sense that Apple would be able to get early batches of Pro's out in November or December.

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post #79 of 134
This might be further evidence that something's coming. I ordered a 13" MacBook Pro for one of our teachers & got this email this morning:

Dear Apple Education Customer,

Thank you for your recent order.

Purchase Order#:
Sales Order#:
Ship-to Zip Code:

Due to an unexpected delay, we are unable to ship the following item(s)
by the date that you were originally quoted:


Z0GL, MBP 13.3/2.53/ CTO
will now ship on or before
Nov 03, 2009

TR632LL/A, INCASE NEOPRENE SLEEVE 13"-BLK/FUR-USA
will now ship on or before
Nov 03, 2009

Please note that product availability can change rapidly, and it is
possible that your order may ship much sooner than we anticipate. You
may even receive a shipment confirmation between the time we send this
email and the time that you read it.

You will receive an email notification once your order has been shipped.
We encourage you to visit: <http://www.apple.com/orderstatus>.

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You think Im an arrogant [expletive] who thinks hes above the law, and I think youre a slime bucket who gets most of his facts wrong. Steve Jobs
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You think Im an arrogant [expletive] who thinks hes above the law, and I think youre a slime bucket who gets most of his facts wrong. Steve Jobs
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post #80 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Apparently the 9400M has a 14 W TDP, so the MBP would be going from 25 W + 14 W TDP = 39 W TDP to 45 + ~5 + ~25 = ~75 W TDP.

You're really telling me that we can just ignore an almost doubling of TDP?

That could make some sense, if Clarksfields were to replace the 25W cpus that Apple uses in SOME notebooks. Given their costs, Clarksfield cpus will probably be used only for the high-end MBPs (replacing the 2.80/3.06GHz models) that have 35W cpus + 14W nvidia chipset + xxW dedicated graphics. Intel's PM55 chipset having a TDP of only 3.5W, the difference in "system" TDP is only a few watts. One could also suppose that newer dedicated gpus will have a lower TDP than the oldies Apple uses right now in the MBPs.

For the low-end MBPs, there will be Arrandale cpus that have a TDP of 25W (core i5) and 35W (core i7) along with the 3.5W PM55 chipset, they have a "system" TDP of 28.5/38.5W. Both versions could receive a low TDP dedicated gpu and still have a total TDP lower than the current MBPs.

The future line-up could look like that, at similar price points:
Core i5-520M DC 2.40GHz 13" MBP + low-end dedicated gpu
Core i5-540M DC 2.53GHz 13" MBP + low-end dedicated gpu
Core i5-540M DC 2.53GHz 15" MBP + low-end dedicated gpu
Core i7-620M DC 2.66GHz 15" MBP + midrange dedicated gpu (that's the only version that would have a higher total TDP than the model it replaces)
Core i7-720QM QC 1.60GHz 15" MBP + high-end dedicated gpu
Core i7-720QM QC 1.60GHz 17" MBP + high-end dedicated gpu
Core i7-820QM QC 1.73GHz 15" MBP (BTO)
Core i7-820QM QC 1.73GHz 17" MBP (BTO)

Since Clarksfields and the PM55 chipset are already available, the "evidence" leaked is probably about the 2x2 high-end models that may be already ready (at least as prototypes).
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drow_Swordsman

A much needed update - though I'd be surprised if the i5 or i7's get in the MBP's, I'm thinking it'll be the Xeon's.

There are no notebook xeon and I don't think Apple is going to pack on an extra half to three quarters of an inch and cut battery time to nothing to use them.

While there are no xeons specifically designed for notebooks, there are notebooks using xeon cpus (just google: notebook workstation xeon). There are a lot of xeon models (in fact there are as many xeon SKUs as notebook+desktop SKUs combined). Some xeons have similar thermal designs as notebook cpus. When Intel originally released the core duo (yonah), they also relased xeons models with a TDP of 15/31W and dual-processing capabilities (sossaman).

Today, the best example would be the low-voltage quad-core Xeon L3426: 45W (like low-end Clarksfields), 1.86GHz (faster than low-end Clarksfields) and only $284 (cheaper than any Clarksfield). Early next year Intel will start releasing Jasper Forest, a new family of Xeon cpus (from 1 core to 4 cores, 23W to 85W), DMI based (3420 chipset), but with dual-processing capabilities (1 QPI link). A lot of different devices could use this (lower cost/lower TDP) architecture, including mobile ones.

Xeon doesn't just mean huge/power hogs/expensive cpus anymore.
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