or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Google reveals Android 2.0 features, updates
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Google reveals Android 2.0 features, updates

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Details were released Tuesday on the Android 2.0 platform, adding features and support to Google's open-source mobile operating system.

Google announced that version 2.0 support would be added in the software development kit for Android, so application developers can begin to use the system on their latest builds. The Android 2.0 platform contains many notable upgrades and updates in several categories.

Contact and account management seem to have seen the brunt of the updates. Multiple accounts can now be added to Android devices for email and contact synchronization, including optional Exchange support. Another added feature is called Quick Contact, which provides instant one-touch access to multiple ways of interacting with a contact including call, text, and email.

Other features include:

Searchable SMS and MMS messages

Updated camera support for built-in flash, digital zoom, white balance, and
macro focus

Improved keyboard layout with smarter predictive text and multi-touch support

Browser upgrades including thumbnail bookmarks and double-tap zoom functionality

Improved graphics performance through revamped graphics architecture and better hardware acceleration

Support for Bluetooth 2.1



No release date has been revealed for consumer-level rollout of the new platform, however Motorola's Droid is rumored to be running Android 2.0 and will be released before the end of the year. Verizon has positioned the Droid as being the superior alternative to the iPhone, and has aggressively advertised this message with the "iDon't" series of ads.

Android was first introduced in November of 2007 by the Open Handset Alliance, a consortium of companies dedicated to the development of open standards for mobile devices. The open-source platform has found its way onto a myriad of devices from HTC's line of phones to the Archos 5 Internet Tablet and Barnes & Nobles' Nook e-book reader.
post #2 of 59
Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android? Other than the multitasking, I found the phones hard to use. The user interface was not as intuitive. The phone froze a few times.... sold by TMobile.
post #3 of 59
Good enough for me on Verizon till the iPhone eventually comes (and it will).
post #4 of 59
iPhone 4.0 will likely grab these from Android...

Searchable SMS and MMS messages
Unified Email Inbox
Coverflow bookmarks
Google Voice Search
post #5 of 59
Perhaps Android 2.0 features will prod Apple to actually listen to their customers' requests and shelve their "let'm eat cake" attitude.

But I doubt it.
post #6 of 59
So what's that thing in the video that looks like a chocolate eclair? The little logo.
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

So what's that thing in the video that looks like a chocolate eclair? The little logo.

An eclair. Android versions all have food associated with them: 1.5 was Cupcake, 1.6 was Donut, 2.0 is Eclair, and 3.0 will be Flan (future release).
post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

So what you are saying is after being on the market for two years the iPhone will catch up to a phone that hasn't even been released. That is pretty tyical for Apple put out hardware and after 4 updates it works correctly, or at least somewhat correctly

If you choosing not to compare it to Android OS , but instead specifically compare it Android OS 2.0 then you cant honestly compare it to the previously released versions of iPhone OS X.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android? Other than the multitasking, I found the phones hard to use. The user interface was not as intuitive. The phone froze a few times.... sold by TMobile.

Some articles from cross platform mobile developers that really detail some of the issues that plague these other platforms from a developer standpoint to a user standpoint. The App Store competition and user base are not the only reason that developers charge less for iPhone apps. Its often more of a hassle. Ill try to dig up some of the good articles.


Quote:
Originally Posted by retroneo View Post

iPhone 4.0 will likely grab these from Android...

Searchable SMS and MMS messages
Unified Email Inbox
Coverflow bookmarks
Google Voice Search

Im mostly concerned with having a robust messaging system like WebOS and Android have. The simple overlay that can only show one message at a time and has centralized storage of pervious messages, their arrival times and what app they came from just doesnt work with the PNS.

I expect that the 3GS and the next iPhone HW update will get 3rd-party background app capabilities, but this takes some planning and coding to do it right, the way copy/paste is unmatched on any other finger-based phone. You cant have every app running in the background when you press the home button and you need a way to keep this 3rd-party background app from overtaking the RAM and CPU cycles of the app you are currently using. Its trickier than some people think to make this work for developers.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #10 of 59
I'm surprised Apple doesn't have some IP associated with Android. As an Apple share owner I'd like to see them make some money off of the competition.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by kozchris View Post

I'm surprised Apple doesn't have some IP associated with Android. As an Apple share owner I'd like to see them make some money off of the competition.

Built from the ground up from Linux. It’s completely free to use. Google is saving on ad revenue costs from other people’s browser. Perhaps even avoidance of paying anything to Apple or others…

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-10161312-37.html
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by kozchris View Post

I'm surprised Apple doesn't have some IP associated with Android. As an Apple share owner I'd like to see them make some money off of the competition.


microsoft and a few other companies own most of the IP for iphone OS and Android. Google is an Active Sync licensee just like Apple
post #13 of 59
I hope when Google is done copying Apple two years after the fact they'll actually offer something interesting.
post #14 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

microsoft and a few other companies own most of the IP for iphone OS and Android. Google is an Active Sync licensee just like Apple

Define most because licensing the use of Active Sync is quite insignificant to the entirety of iPhone OS X.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

microsoft and a few other companies own most of the IP for iphone OS and Android. Google is an Active Sync licensee just like Apple

considering that apple's newton os predates palm's first os and windows ce by two or three years, i somehow doubt that.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

So what you are saying is after being on the market for two years the iPhone will catch up to a phone that hasn't even been released. That is pretty tyical for Apple put out hardware and after 4 updates it works correctly, or at least somewhat correctly

Apple does not compete on features. Apple provides ease of use and an integrated user experience - features come later after they are well adopted in the market and Apple can expect the below-average user to be familiar with them.

Do it simple. Do it right. Then add more bells and whistles. Power users will whine and complain, "the masses" will buy them in droves because they're so easy to use.

- Jasen.
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android?

Good question. So much of this Android buzz seems to me to be in the realm of breathless geek anticipation.

Someone please wake me if/when it all shows up in a decent piece of hardware, and works seamlessly and effectively in the wild. And, if by that time, Apple hasn't moved the goalpost even more.
post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Built from the ground up from Linux. It’s completely free to use. Google is saving on ad revenue costs from other people’s browser. Perhaps even avoidance of paying anything to Apple or others…

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-10161312-37.html

Sorry, but built from the ground up with Linux means the Kernel and that's where it ends.

Every thing they add isn't being given freely back as GPLv3. They have their own licensing structure just like iPhone.

Is there a reason the actual Feature page isn't linked?

http://developer.android.com/sdk/and...ighlights.html

Android's API is nowhere near as robust as Cocoa.

The CMDA Telephony and no GSM Telephony seems to narrow the scope for this platform around the globe.

Google should be kissing Apache Foundation's rear for all the features the global Java Community adds without any footprint on their end.

I'll leave the WebKit stuff as obvious.

http://developer.android.com/reference/packages.html
post #19 of 59
Now, hurry up and wait for both the manufacturer and the carrier (particularly in the US) to 'fix' Android for your individual model phone, and to optimize the revenue capabilities of the phone for the carrier...
post #20 of 59
When I look at the average user of the iPhone, what they like the most about the iPhone is the simplicity of use. The user interface is intuitive to use. No need to read a user manual... just a simple video or sales person demo at the ATT or Apple store will do.
The iPhone software is stable, rarely crashes.

The hardware design is simple... only one main button to use! The iPhone can be anything the app demands. Without the mechanical keyboard, I can use it is several languages and characters.

The other phones like the Android, Pre, and Windows Mobile may have some distinct features... the majority of people do not use them. Apple has successful in the market because of the mass market appeal... what the majority wants.

The Pre has turned to be a dud. I did not see the Android flying off the T-Mobile shelves. The store in my neighborhood is dead most of the time. It will get shelf space with VZ along with a bunch of other phones. Why should it stand out?
post #21 of 59
Quick Contact allows you tap on picture to dial that person?
There are plenty 3rd party picture dialers for iPhone. I use Fun Dialer.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android? Other than the multitasking, I found the phones hard to use. The user interface was not as intuitive. The phone froze a few times.... sold by TMobile.

In my brief encounter with the G2, I was really quite underwhelmed with Android. It's just not well thought out compared with iPhone OS.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Built from the ground up from Linux. Its completely free to use. Google is saving on ad revenue costs from other peoples browser. Perhaps even avoidance of paying anything to Apple or others
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-10161312-37.html

I think he was referring to possible patent infringement on the part of Android. To be honest, I'm not familiar enough with the details of Apple's patents to know.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android?

It is most likely to be Windows Mobile killer. That's what's special about Android.

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android? Other than the multitasking, I found the phones hard to use. The user interface was not as intuitive. The phone froze a few times.... sold by TMobile.

Because it is an alternative to the iPhone. At the time it came out, Palm and Blackberry phones were the other options. Yes they had some apps, but they couldn't do many fun things like render HTML properly. The software didn't get pushed to its limits, the hardware was blah. The iPhone revolutionized all that. Im happy for that, but I don't want an iPhone, I don't want ATT.
<rant>
I personally am upset with ATT with the bullshit they put me through. With ATT, There were dead zones on my university campus, I could walk 1.5 miles across campus before my phone would even join the network again, and I tried power-cycling it too. They said their (corporate generated) map showed I should have full coverage. I didn't. Sitting in my room, a roommate on All-tel and another of Tmobile both had reception where ATT didn't. So after trying to work on this for a month, including upgrading a phone and sim card, everything, I gave up and switched to something I knew that worked. THEN ATT released a commercial with the mix of cities their phones worked in. My city was one of them. I stopped trying with ATT. Tmobile has treated me nicely every time I call them up. No problems, No complaints. And Im saving money on my plan, compared to some people i know.
</rant>

Why is the Android so special? Because it is a phone that finally does everything I want. It receives emails, shows text messages in conversation form, renders HTML properly, syncs my contacts, email and calendar. Now, If I add something to my calendar from any one of my computers (iCal), Google Calendar or my G1, it will sync with the other two. IF i happen to lose my phone, which has happened once, I haven't lost my contacts, email or calendar. If/When i get a replacement, it will resync all 3 of those. It has apps that I love, and I can customize it. I use google maps religiously trying to learn how to navigate downtown chicago. I can take pictures/video and update them. Yes I know everything an iPhone does, But not everyone wants an iPhone. Believe it or not.

I am not starting a flame war, my rant about ATT is my own personal experience, not yours. I understand there are people happy with ATT who hate Tmobile, but that is their experience. I am an apple enthusiast, except for when it comes to the iPhone. I don't own one and don't need to own one. I think its awesome what it does, but it isn't a product I want. My roommate bought one and she hates it.

Yes my android might be playing catch up, but the iPhone wasn't perfect its first couple versions. I have an Android, and I love it. Granted, there are little things I hate, but my experience overall rates as the best phone I've ever had.
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

The CMDA Telephony and no GSM Telephony seems to narrow the scope for this platform around the globe.[/url]

Android has been used in GSM networks long before it can be used in CDMA networks
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Can somebody tell me what is special about the Android? Other than the multitasking, I found the phones hard to use. The user interface was not as intuitive. The phone froze a few times.... sold by TMobile.

More productivity than iPhone.

iPhone is a wonderful game and multimedia gadget but, for my needs, it doesn't compete with Android in work tasks.

PNS it's a joe compared with the notification system of Android. Having local alarms implies that the phone doesn't have to be online to trigger an alarm (tasks, todos, etc). Background applications implies that I choose in any moment which applications are self updating (Facebook, Twitter, etc).

I can receive and email while listening to Spotify, change the application, do the things needed and no one applications is closed.

And the battery life of the Hero lasts a lot more than the battery of my 3G
post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

When I look at the average user of the iPhone, what they like the most about the iPhone is the simplicity of use. The user interface is intuitive to use. No need to read a user manual... just a simple video or sales person demo at the ATT or Apple store will do.
The iPhone software is stable, rarely crashes.

The hardware design is simple... only one main button to use! The iPhone can be anything the app demands. Without the mechanical keyboard, I can use it is several languages and characters.

The other phones like the Android, Pre, and Windows Mobile may have some distinct features... the majority of people do not use them. Apple has successful in the market because of the mass market appeal... what the majority wants.

The Pre has turned to be a dud. I did not see the Android flying off the T-Mobile shelves. The store in my neighborhood is dead most of the time. It will get shelf space with VZ along with a bunch of other phones. Why should it stand out?

The Pre & Android fanbois on this thread seem to believe what is good for them must be good for the masses. As in the past, they will get another taste of how the real-world actually is.

The Pre & Android are simply overhyped curiosities that will mainly appeal to the geeks and techies. Time will tell whether the masses will adopt them.

What these folks seem to refuse to see from their basement monitors is that the iPhone provides an end-to-end user experience and does not try to have the everything-and-the-kitchen-sink features that the competitors are attempting to do. How many times in other areas does that failure have to happen before people begin to get a clue? It's why Apple's product appeals to the masses. Because it is simple to use and people appreciate the attention to details.

Doesn't matter... those ego's will rationalize it one way or another that their way is the only way.
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The Pre & Android fanbois on this thread seem to believe what is good for them must be good for the masses. As in the past, they will get another taste of how the real-world actually is.

The Pre & Android are simply overhyped curiosities that will mainly appeal to the geeks and techies. Time will tell whether the masses will adopt them.

What these folks seem to refuse to see from their basement monitors is that the iPhone provides an end-to-end user experience and does not try to have the everything-and-the-kitchen-sink features that the competitors are attempting to do. How many times in other areas does that failure have to happen before people begin to get a clue? It's why Apple's product appeals to the masses. Because it is simple to use and people appreciate the attention to details.

Doesn't matter... those ego's will rationalize it one way or another that their way is the only way.

It's amazing how easy is insulting others choices. Geeks, fanbois, basement monitors.

Sometimes I'm embarrased of having Apple products because those comments. People which have chosen not using some Apple product are geeks, fanbois, nerds, etc.
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The Pre & Android fanbois on this thread seem to believe what is good for them must be good for the masses. As in the past, they will get another taste of how the real-world actually is.

Blinded with all your insults you fail to see that Android is quite similar to iPhone in the "ease-of-use" category. I wouldn't say it is equal, but pretty close. iPhone feels more "polished", first time Android users who came from iPhone background might be puzzled by the abundance of the buttons (five of them !!), but essentially it is still the same experience. Fast responses, intuitive, great messaging (Android is superior in that regard) and browser. Android excels in multitasking, it is done right and is intuitive. Hate if an app takes me to the browser on iPhone, there is no way back, I have to go through home - hate this. As mentioned above, Android has far superior notification system, that works offline, too.
For me the most interesting feature is that Android tries to force developers to be collaborative and leverage work of the others and offer their functions for sharing, sharp contrast to monolithic approach of iPhone. Last but not least, Android Market actually outperforms AppStore (in the respective time since its launch).

In every aspect, it is a very serious competition to iPhone.
post #31 of 59
I second the define most. Apple easily owns several hundred patents related to the iPhone. The only thing Apple pays Microsoft for is Exchange. I know Apple licenses Ericsson's patents. Nokia is complaining that Apple isn't paying it for the use of it's patents.

I too am excited to hear about how Microsoft's patents exceed Apple's own. Please provide some links if you can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

microsoft and a few other companies own most of the IP for iphone OS and Android. Google is an Active Sync licensee just like Apple
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paladinkn00be View Post

Because it is an alternative to the iPhone.

you just proved there is nothing special about it. everything you said you like doing on the android phone can be done on the iphone and it has better touch interface. and in australia i think you would love the iphone because you can use it with ALL carriers. Cheers
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

More productivity than iPhone
And the battery life of the Hero lasts a lot more than the battery of my 3G

OK that's not true. not even possible. but that's OK - hype it up to justify the constant memory clogging and task management you have to do.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

Last but not least, Android Market actually outperforms AppStore (in the respective time since its launch).

In every aspect, it is a very serious competition to iPhone.

right right - how many millions of downloads? how many polished apps? how many purchases? please provide some stats to back up your claims.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

An eclair. Android versions all have food associated with them: 1.5 was Cupcake, 1.6 was Donut, 2.0 is Eclair, and 3.0 will be Flan (future release).

Version 7 will be Karmic Kreme.
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
Reply
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
Reply
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abracadabra View Post

Quick Contact allows you tap on picture to dial that person?
There are plenty 3rd party picture dialers for iPhone. I use Fun Dialer.

What happens when the person has 3 phone numbers? Which one does it dial when you click their picture?
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by samanjj View Post

right right - how many millions of downloads? how many polished apps? how many purchases? please provide some stats to back up your claims.

It could be true. For a little while the PS3 "outperformed" the PS2 (in the respective time since its launch). The problem is that both the PS2 and the iPhone app store ramped quickly after that initial period. That and no one really cares about "respective time since launch" if it doesn't overtake the competition. It's kinda like beating Lance Armstrong for the 1st couple stages of the tour de france. Mkay, that's nice. Didya beat him to the finish line? Only 2 guys did his 1st year back from retirement...
post #38 of 59
I have a Palm Pre, and it has one major thing that I wish they would add to the iPhone:

Integrated messaging.

From one application, you can SMS and IM, on several IM networks.

Out of the box the iPhone can only text. Not everyone I message from my phone is on text! Integrated messaging is what attracted me to the Pre. Why the heck can't Apple implement this?

This is the feature I'd miss most if I went from the Pre to the iPhone. I like most things about the Pre; the OS could be a bit faster but I'm sure they will fix that.

(You'll notice that I don't really root for any one platform. I want iPhone, WebOS and Android to all succeed, so we have healthy competition in the marketplace. It would SUCK for any one of them to become completely dominant; we learned that lesson on computers with Windows.)
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by samanjj View Post

right right - how many millions of downloads? how many polished apps? how many purchases? please provide some stats to back up your claims.

The comparison of the stats has been published on various places, I guess it was also mentioned here. Should I really search it for you ?
And note, talking about the relative time from the start of the respective app markets, not the current state of AppStore (which is definitely a success for Apple). I leave the initial "all we need is Safari web applications" iPhone period out.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

It could be true. For a little while the PS3 "outperformed" the PS2 (in the respective time since its launch). The problem is that both the PS2 and the iPhone app store ramped quickly after that initial period. That and no one really cares about "respective time since launch" if it doesn't overtake the competition. It's kinda like beating Lance Armstrong for the 1st couple stages of the tour de france. Mkay, that's nice. Didya beat him to the finish line? Only 2 guys did his 1st year back from retirement...

I never said the Android Market will keep it up...it remains to be seen how they will fare from now on. It is cheaper than Apple and - arguably - easier to develop for Android (since it is Java based) so it might be on par if enough developers see the money can be made on the platform. We'll see.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Google reveals Android 2.0 features, updates