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Apple expands school initiative with Atlanta MacBook program

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
More than 1,200 students in Atlanta will be equipped with new MacBooks in what is said to be one of the largest Apple school technology rollouts in the U.S.

In August, Greater Atlanta Christian Schools will give each of its students in grades 6 through 12 a new MacBook loaded with proprietary software, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. The computers will be paid for through the private schools' tuition, and will be accompanied by iPod touches that the students' families will be expected to individually finance.

The multimillion dollar upgrade will cost older students' families a 13.8 percent annual tuition increase, to $14,400 per year. Elementary school students will have a 7.8 percent increase, to $13,100 annually.

Laptops will be provided to all students, including those that already have computers at home. Each new MacBook will have insurance and tech support.

John Couch, Apple's vice president of education, is scheduled to visit the Greater Atlanta Christian Schools next week to talk about technology in the classroom, and to thank the schools for their purchase.

This year, Apple expanded its MacBook program in Maine, a project that is said to be the largest of its kind. As part of the deal, the state's Department of Education ordered more than 64,000 MacBooks for students and faculty in grades 7 through 12. The Maine Learning Technology Initiative has provided Apple laptops to all middle school students for years, making it the first and only state with a program that provides notebooks for every student.

Apple noted during its Q4 2009 quarterly conference call that the program has been very successful. It was said that 50,000 MacBooks were sent to the state during the September quarter as part of the ongoing initiative.

This month, Apple released a redesigned unibody 13-inch MacBook with an LED backlit display, built-in battery and glass multitouch trackpad. The polycarbonate plastic hardware is the cheapest Apple laptop at $999.

This summer, Apple noted that education sales have slowed due to budget constraints during the ongoing recession. The biggest hit has been in grades kindergarten through 12. Apple has lobbied the government on stimulus funding for local grade schools, something the Cupertino, Calif., company hopes will increase Mac purchases from public schools.

In September, Apple unveiled a new education licensing program for its software. Through the new plan, institutions can purchase annual coverage to keep their Mac software up to date. Each year, a license renewal provides 12 months of guaranteed upgrades to the latest releases of Apple software.
post #2 of 14
I think this sentence needs some qualifications, as Apple regularly sells thousands of computers at a time to school systems all over the US.. It is certainly sizable by private school standards...
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Proeger View Post

I think this sentence needs some qualifications, as Apple regularly sells thousands of computers at a time to school systems all over the US.. It is certainly sizable by private school standards...

I was going to say the same thing. Although I taught a private school for years. This sort of student requirement is not out of the ordinary, as the school is probably getting school/teacher computers as part of this deal too.

Tuition costs more than most colleges, adding a laptop doesn't mean anything to those parents.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Proeger View Post

I think this sentence needs some qualifications, as Apple regularly sells thousands of computers at a time to school systems all over the US.. It is certainly sizable by private school standards...


Welcome to Propaganda 101

Lesson #1: Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see.

(Especially from MSNBC and to a lesser extent Foxnews.)


What I wonder is how much Apple is paying for the slant, or is it just their preference for a certain political thinking that others of like mind tend to distort the facts in return favor fashion?

(I'm assuming the statement in question came from the original article of course, although the source of the article seems to be a very conservative paper, which could mean they don't read the more liberal mainstream media and thus didn't know about the Maine program)

Could it be the original writer and editor are just ignorant or lazy to do their online research? I doubt that.

It's a sad world where your bank gambles with your savings and the media distorts the truth.

Yes, I'll go back to bed and shut up now, my seeds of doubt have been planted.
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by donlphi View Post

Tuition costs more than most colleges, adding a laptop doesn't mean anything to those parents.

Whoa hold on a minute there.

I am a GAC parent, yeah one of THOSE parents, and I have an issue with the program, especially in this economy.

I'm paying approx. $1200-1400 more for tuition to support a MacBook that is lesser than than the MacBook my child currently owns. These MacBooks would be OK about 12-18 months ago, the "proprietary" software they are putting on must be pretty special. It would make more sense if they were using the newer MacBooks. So my child is forced to use inferior equipment and I have to pay for it, like it or not, I would not mind as much if it were an upgrade.

Here's what they are getting

SPECIFICATIONS

t2.13 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
t2GB memory
t120G Serial ATA Drive
tMini DVI Port
tMulti-Touch trackpad
tAirPort Extreme Card (802.11n)
tBuilt-in Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
tTwo USB 2.0 ports
tOne FireWire 400 port
tGigabit Ethernet port
tFull-size keyboard
tBuilt-in iSight camera
tBuilt-in stereo speakers
tBuilt-in omnidirectional microphone
tRemovable battery
tDVD drive
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Here's what they are getting

are you sure on that? It read as fulfillment next year; while I am sure it would be announced with the specs when the deal was made, the shipping units should be current standard as of a month or so before delivery.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JKG View Post

Whoa hold on a minute there.

I am a GAC parent, yeah one of THOSE parents, and I have an issue with the program, especially in this economy.

I'm paying approx. $1200-1400 more for tuition to support a MacBook that is lesser than than the MacBook my child currently owns. These MacBooks would be OK about 12-18 months ago, the "proprietary" software they are putting on must be pretty special. It would make more sense if they were using the newer MacBooks. So my child is forced to use inferior equipment and I have to pay for it, like it or not, I would not mind as much if it were an upgrade.

Here's what they are getting

SPECIFICATIONS

t2.13 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
t2GB memory
t120G Serial ATA Drive
tMini DVI Port
tMulti-Touch trackpad
tAirPort Extreme Card (802.11n)
tBuilt-in Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
tTwo USB 2.0 ports
tOne FireWire 400 port
tGigabit Ethernet port
tFull-size keyboard
tBuilt-in iSight camera
tBuilt-in stereo speakers
tBuilt-in omnidirectional microphone
tRemovable battery
tDVD drive

While I agree that you're "not getting the same value," consider this: that price is probably also inflated to purchase laptops for the teachers and training as well.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zok2000 View Post

While I agree that you're "not getting the same value," consider this: that price is probably also inflated to purchase laptops for the teachers and training as well.

Yes, well keep in mind, there are other costly items included, mentioned in the story:
insurance, proprietary software, AppleCare, and I would assume they will be installing infrastructure like servers, wireless, Professional services for installation and setup, professional development for training teachers, and perhaps classroom tools like Apple Remote Desktop, projectors, etc.

There are always a lot of costs associated with such a rollout.

On another note, the specs the parent mentioned would be very strange to roll out 10 months from now, when that is already obsolete to the Apple product line.. so I doubt that will be the case.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

are you sure on that? It read as fulfillment next year; while I am sure it would be announced with the specs when the deal was made, the shipping units should be current standard as of a month or so before delivery.

That's straight from the GAC Website, see for yourself.

http://www.greateratlantachristian.o....aspx?pid=1374

I guess I would have liked to have an option, my child was wanting a 13" aluminum MBP but now will be stuck with this for next year, I'd have been willing to pay extra for the Proprietary Software and support but to spend the lions share of the increase on an outdated MacBook leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
post #10 of 14
Don't forget the added costs of trying to stop the degradation of the kids' eyesight after using glossy screens for that many hours a day.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Welcome to Propaganda 101

Lesson #1: Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see.

(Especially from MSNBC and to a lesser extent Foxnews.)

While I agree with you about MSNBC (they seem to have a non-news political agenda, FauxNews is anything but a news outlet. They are an entertainment site in the same vein as the John Stewart show and the Colbert Report. They just cater to people with more conservative political views.

That's one of the biggest problems with news on TV currently. The show's existence is dependent upon viewers and ad-driven revenue. Unfortunately viewers are drawn to non-informative (Right or Left) political drivel.
post #12 of 14
seems like apple can do wrong lately
when the economy comes back
apple should really take off
when this new WMB ships it will have up to date spec's when shipped
so i expect an even better when showing up
1200 new converts to the apple universe
welcome
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whats in a name ? 
beatles
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post #13 of 14
This has to be one of Apple's best Advertising stints... and has been for years! Getting Apples in the schools so that the kids when grown up buy Apples. It worked on me for a little while.

Anyhow, I'd love to see some linux machines rolled out in schools. All the software is free, and if the kids want to have the same thing at home, send them back with a Live CD. No worries about Office compatibility with OpenOffice, and there are some kid-friendly apps out there for Linux too. Eh, it'll probably never happen as long as MS and Apple have money to lobby School Boards.
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
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Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
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post #14 of 14
Proprietary software, eh.

I wonder what's under 'Charles Darwin' in the dictionary.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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