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Flash playback issues reported on Apple's new 27-inch iMacs - Page 2

post #41 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by DominoXML View Post

Do you mean MS-Remote Connections? If yes, have you tried the MS tool?

http://www.microsoft.com/mac/product...p/default.mspx

Remote Desktop Connection for Mac doesn't cut it since it doesn't support the TS Gateway settings
post #42 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I can say is it shouldn't do this. I use VMWare and it doesn't exhibit this behaviour at all. I've never seen it on anyone else's installation of VMWare either.

Do you know people using the new 21.5" iMac? I'm thinking it may be a driver issue. I may just need to wait for an update to one of the virtualization softwares.
post #43 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post

I understand the complaints that "flash sucks on the Mac", but I would have expected that by now, the issue would have been resolved.

PCs don't seem to have a problem with flash-based content, so why is it still such an issue with Mac systems years after the fact. Now, it's just getting ridiculous.

Now before people start aiming their guns at me -- yes, flash in general is not exactly the most loved standard on the web, but that STILL does not excuse years and years and YEARS of craptacular playback on Macs.

That being said, I don't know who's more to blame, Apple or Adobe.

well, being that flash is adobe's baby, i would have to think that the problem is on their end. anybody that remembers the history of adobe & apple in the 'good old days' has to be concerned about where things are going. as somebody that - by choice - still uses adobe illustrator 10 over the bloatware that is CS4, i'm not hopeful that this situation is going to get any better.

adobe has abandoned its mac user base years ago. if you look at the amount of products that adobe lists on their website, you can see that the tools that are critical to graphic designers on the mac are probably just 5 out of 100 or so. i don't know where adobe makes its money, but from their product list it looks like they see more value in supporting windows with cheap crap than in supporting high end mac software. their flagship products are now windows first and the mac has turned into an afterthought.

i have no doubt that there are talented software engineers at adobe, but they are obviously having their priorities set by the people at the top. the only software that hasn't turned into bloat from the macromedia portfolio they picked up years ago is final cut, now owned by apple.

i think that apple should take a hard look at adobe and consider buying the lot. almost ten years after osx came out and the cocoa writing was on the wall, adobe now states that photoshop etc. would have to be rewritten from scratch (surprise!) and are using that as an excuse for lagging mac versions.

can you imagine how many graphics people would buy high end mac pros if the mac versions would get preferential treatment at an apple owned adobe? i don't know if they could shut down windows development altogether, but they could certainly prioritize the todo lists of their most talented people.

the same graphics whores that switched to windows in the 90s would certainly buy new shiny boxes from apple if that's where their tools would run the best.

i also think that adobe's product line could use some of that minimalist obsession that mr jobs is so famous for.

as for flash - if apple owned it, i'm sure it could get optimized for the mac, replaced by quicktime on the video front, open sourced, or killed outright. i certainly wouldn't miss it.
post #44 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranson View Post

Had the new 27" iMac for a week now with no problems, flash or otherwise. In fact, I just got an EyeTv adapter yesterday and now use it as a television too!

droool. My dream...
Must save up money. Must stop outside cappuccino habit.
post #45 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKWalsh4 View Post

I bet this is all happening because they didn't include Blu-Ray in the new iMac's. And not having matte makes viewing Flash ads a big pain




Is this teckstud relative
post #46 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

It's not arrogant or a biased assumption at all, and it has nothing to do with the fact that they are specifically Flash developers.

Just look at all the horrible ports of software from one platform to another where the developers can't be bothered to learn native development but use some sort of porting tool, or learn the bare minimum and just do a transliteration from one platform to another. Not learning and understanding the platform you are developing on and it's native API is always a recipe for disaster, just like not learning and understanding French would be a disaster when translating, say, Shakespeare's Sonnets from English to French, but just running it through a translation tool. The author was obviously quite talented, and they are great literature in English, but I don't think the resulting French version would be well received.

I see your analogy with the language translation; however, you are completely missing the point of object oriented programming....your analogy points to an instruction per instruction translation. I'm talking about objects which allow for all of the many instructions (properties and methods if you will) to be abstracted into a simple API thats common to any object-oriented based language...imagine if you and the french person had a language barrier and you needed to describe the parts of a car to him....if the car is in front of you (object) you simply point to the various parts (tires, window, etc) and he "gets it" with no verbal communication at all.....you have abstracted the description of the car by using the object.

Since Cocoa Touch is a collection of Frameworks (UIKit, Foundation, etc) and each Framework is a collection of classes, Apple has enabled porting to an artform! Adobe was able to port actionscript easily to a compliant iPhone app. This is where software is headed in this day and age. Do you know how many programmers are able to code successful products without knowing the intricacies of the target hardware architecture.....come on man...catch-up....don't give me this "porting always leads to disaster" talk of the 1980's.
post #47 of 107
AppleInsider blowing smoke out of their asses again. "Duh, flash run good on Windows...duh, flash run bad on Mac. Duh, must be Mac itself, not software." What a lame conclusion.

It could be the flash version for Mac OS X that causes the problem, or it could be the websites that people are going to that cause the problem. Maybe the flash animation itself on those sites was poorly done. Maybe the people having problems are running browser hacks that cause the problem.

I hate flash animation sites. Useless eye candy that slows everything down.
post #48 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

AppleInsider blowing smoke out of their asses again. "Duh, flash run good on Windows...duh, flash run bad on Mac. Duh, must be Mac itself, not software." What a lame conclusion.

It could be the flash version for Mac OS X that causes the problem, or it could be the websites that people are going to that cause the problem. Maybe the flash animation itself on those sites was poorly done. Maybe the people having problems are running browser hacks that cause the problem.

I hate flash animation sites. Useless eye candy that slows everything down.

Obviously with 93% web penetration, more people love the eye-candy than those of you who hate it.....uninstall the Flash plug-in and go away.....if a site has Flash...go to another site and be done with it much like you change channels on the TV.....just because a few of you....7%... hate Flash doesn't mean it should go away......just visit the 7% of sites that don't have Flash and be happy.....the rest of us will enjoy the other 93%....that should settle the matter once and for all.
post #49 of 107
Poorly crafted Flash will run poorly on any platform. Well crafted Flash will run well.

My guess its a driver issue with the ATi cards in combination with the Flash Player running only in 32-bit.

Seriously Apple please only use nVidia solutions from now on (ones that don't have heat problems that is).

Flash performance on OS X is slightly behind Windows but has come a tremendous way with Flash Player 10.

AI, seriously provide some more details in the article, like what websites... what version of Flash Player people are using etc.
post #50 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

Flash on Mac OS X sucks hard.

No it doesn't. It works perfectly well on my 24' iMac8,1, Snow Leopard, and the latest Flash. As usual, there seems to be parallel universes at work here. The universe where Flash works and the anti-universe where it sucks. My daughter bought a new 27" iMac and has reported no such trouble with viewing Flash content.

This whole argument is no more relevant than the at&t sucks, no it doesn't suck diatribe.
post #51 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

I see your analogy with the language translation; however, you are completely missing the point of object oriented programming....your analogy points to an instruction per instruction translation. I'm talking about objects which allow for all of the many instructions (properties and methods if you will) to be abstracted into a simple API thats common to any object-oriented based language...imagine if you and the french person had a language barrier and you needed to describe the parts of a car to him....if the car is in front of you (object) you simply point to the various parts (tires, window, etc) and he "gets it" with no verbal communication at all.....you have abstracted the description of the car by using the object.

Since Cocoa Touch is a collection of Frameworks (UIKit, Foundation, etc) and each Framework is a collection of classes, Apple has enabled porting to an artform! Adobe was able to port actionscript easily to a compliant iPhone app. This is where software is headed in this day and age. Do you know how many programmers are able to code successful products without knowing the intricacies of the target hardware architecture.....come on man...catch-up....don't give me this "porting always leads to disaster" talk of the 1980's.

I'm programming mostly for Windows, because my customers are dependent on it.

Some of my apps can also run on Linux and Mac OS with some features lost.

Since I started developing in the 90's I found no valid real competitive, fullfeatured multi-platform development environment for "native" apps.

I think the reason because there are a lot of really great iPhone apps is, that developers are able to use OS specific features.

For platform independent services and collaboration the "google way" of sophisticated web applications seems to be superior to me.

I understand your point. Porting is painful, but especially on the iPhone I do not expect some ground breaking actionscript applications.

May be I'm wrong. Time will tell...
post #52 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

Obviously with 93% web penetration, more people love the eye-candy than those of you who hate it.. [] ....just because a few of you....7%... hate Flash doesn't mean it should go away......just visit the 7% of sites that don't have Flash and be happy.....the rest of us will enjoy the other 93%....that should settle the matter once and for all.

1) Your excessive and improper ellipses or aposiopesis (or whatever you are doing) does not help your argument. You can write how you please, but if your goal here is to get your point across then a little orthography goes a long way. That said, its far from the worst we see around here. \

2) Your assertion that 7% are unhappy with Flash is erroneous logic. I bet everyone here who takes issue with Flash, myself included, has it installed and that the percentage of users with problems with Flash on Macs is much higher than 7%. Like many with Macs I use ClickToFlash to disable the Flash from loading by default, but I do it from time to time as it ubiquitous at this point.

3) 7% of machines dont have Flash, not 7% of users. They are likely specialized devices that arent on the internet or are secured to a point that Flash and many other plugins are not installed.

4) AOL and Real Player had a huge install base, mostly from coming with store bought PCs, but that doesnt mean these apps were utilized or even liked.
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post #53 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

No it doesn't. It works perfectly well on my 24' iMac8,1, Snow Leopard, and the latest Flash. As usual, there seems to be parallel universes at work here. The universe where Flash works and the anti-universe where it sucks. My daughter bought a new 27" iMac and has reported no such trouble with viewing Flash content.

This whole argument is no more relevant than the at&t sucks, no it doesn't suck diatribe.

It's not abou you and Flash , it's about Flash in general

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post #54 of 107
Flash will be dead soon, or at most will just be a means for video content distribution.

HTML 5 Canvas (especially hardware accelerated) and JS (processingjs.org) development will take over all of visual fluff on the web.
post #55 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDonG4 View Post

Flash will be dead soon, or at most will just be a means for video content distribution.

HTML 5 Canvas (especially hardware accelerated) and JS (processingjs.org) development will take over all of visual fluff on the web.

I do agree with that sentiment, but that will not be for a long time. Flash is much easier to code for while offering greater features and can work on browsers that arent modern. Plus, canvas heavy sites testing out this new HTML5 feature will run up your CPU just like Flash.

An inevitable problem once this paradigm shit occurs is that you cant simply disable Canvas ads like you can Flash ads without a much more intuitive and intelligent plugin since it will part of the regular open source code. Not a problem yet, but I suspect one day it will be.

That said, I look forward to Flash not being as important as it is today. Especially if that means HTTP Streaming of H.264 as standard for websites.
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post #56 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by DominoXML View Post

I'm programming mostly for Windows, because my customers are dependent on it.

Some of my apps can also run on Linux and Mac OS with some features lost.

Since I started developing in the 90's I found no valid real competitive, fullfeatured multi-platform development environment for "native" apps.

I think the reason because there are a lot of really great iPhone apps is, that developers are able to use OS specific features.

For platform independent services and collaboration the "google way" of sophisticated web applications seems to be superior to me.

I understand your point. Porting is painful, but especially on the iPhone I do not expect some ground breaking actionscript applications.

May be I'm wrong. Time will tell...

You have the right attitude.....lets wait and see what happens when the tools are released. I'm particularly excited to see how porting to Cocoa Touch works on the iPhone. Adobe programmer's are some of the best in the world (Photoshop).....If there is anyone who can do it, it would be them....microsoft offered a porting method from iPhone to windows mobile....I'm not sure how well it works yet.

Flash has an incredible IDE!
post #57 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

You have the right attitude.....lets wait and see what happens when the tools are released. I'm particularly excited to see how porting to Cocoa Touch works on the iPhone. Adobe programmer's are some of the best in the world (Photoshop).....If there is anyone who can do it, it would be them....microsoft offered a porting method from iPhone to windows mobile....I'm not sure how well it works yet.

Flash has an incredible IDE!

if you check the thread out at Macrumours, you'll see that lots of people are having issues with slowdown that aren't flash related..they don't even have safari open!
post #58 of 107
All I know is, for the sake of Hulu, I hope things get straightened out on the Mac with regards to Flash.
post #59 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

You have the right attitude.....lets wait and see what happens when the tools are released. I'm particularly excited to see how porting to Cocoa Touch works on the iPhone. Adobe programmer's are some of the best in the world (Photoshop).....If there is anyone who can do it, it would be them....microsoft offered a porting method from iPhone to windows mobile....I'm not sure how well it works yet.

Flash has an incredible IDE!

I have bought my first Cocoa book. Hope I'm not to old for the "old-fashioned way".
With platform specific features I meant things like CoreImage, CoreData, CoreLocation, GCD and OpenCL.
post #60 of 107
I can sum up in a few words why flash is making such an issue on the 27" imacs only.

Its simple

People that have gone out and bought the 27" have done so because they want the latest and greatest. The iPenis as it were.

If they had plugged in their keyboards and the left hand side shift key made a clunking noise then you will hear about it on a blog and suddenly all the other "early adopters" out there start reporting they too now have the same issue.

But was it really an issue?

Probably not.... i mean im not saying that it wouldn't be annoying. But i wouldn't call it news worthy.

The same kinda thing is happening with flash. Remember when 10.6 came out all those months ago now and low and behold flash was running like a pig. Turned out that there was an older version running. That too made front page news. But why?

A few days later there was a flash patch and suddenly oh it works. Its par for the course.

In this case id say that there was probably an older patch installed of flash or maybe there is a clash with a driver to fun the "friggin huge" screen. Either way it will be patched sooner rather than later and these people will then have to find something else to bitch about.

Funny if it was hardware alone or software alone that the smaller 21.5" people don't seem to be making as much of a fuss about this.
This makes me lean towards the driver clash with the display drivers.
post #61 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinder View Post

I've actually experienced some pretty poor Flash performance on my new Macbook Pro

My guess is two fold:
1. Flash on OS X sucks
2. Apple is pissed about Flash being so poorly built that they're refusing to spend dev hours fixing issues they run into with it - OR it's simply very, very low on their priority list.


Isn't it Adobe's responsibility? It is their software, isn't it?
post #62 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by debusoh View Post

Isn't it Adobe's responsibility? It is their software, isn't it?

But given how much of a presence Flash has on the web, you'd think that Apple would want to work with Adobe to resolve the issue. Apple may not like Flash, but there's no reason for this to have gone on for so long.

Both parties need to come to the table to resolve this. I mean, I consider flash to be a rather basic necessity for web surfing.
post #63 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by SinisterJoe View Post

Unfortunately only Adobe has the power to fix this problem. This is exactly why we shouldn't be relying on a closed source platform for a core Internet standard. Adobe ignored Flash on Linux for years and finally in the last 12-18 months has given it some attention. Now it's quite good. Flash on the Mac is a distant third in terms of performance and stability.

Flash on 32bit Linux is better. Flash on 64bit Linux is far less acceptable.
post #64 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by heathsnow View Post

Remote Desktop Connection for Mac doesn't cut it since it doesn't support the TS Gateway settings

What the hell does Terminal Services Gateway [Microsoft Terminal Services] have to do with OS X?

Apple's Terminal Services are POSIX Compliant.

Windows TS are not.

Windows doesn't want to play nice with everyone else. That's how they spread into the Enterprise and cut out every other vendor OS.
post #65 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

I see your analogy with the language translation; however, you are completely missing the point of object oriented programming....

Since Cocoa Touch is a collection of Frameworks (UIKit, Foundation, etc) and each Framework is a collection of classes, Apple has enabled porting to an artform! ....don't give me this "porting always leads to disaster" talk of the 1980's.

Porting does not always lead to disaster, but it almost always does when the developers port the conventions of the original platform to the new one. This doesn't have anything to do with Cocoa Touch or object oriented programming in general. The same problems would exist whether the native development environment were smalltalk or assembly language. Every user interface, just like every language, has a way of behaving, presenting information to a user and reacting to user input that is unique. It doesn't matter how good a job Adobe does translating Flash to Objective-C code, they can't translate those idioms and if the developers don't understand them, and use them, which most people looking to Flash as their ticket to an iPhone app won't, because they are looking for shortcuts and quick fixes, then the app won't work well on the platform. So there's every reason to believe that most of these Flash apps will generally not work well as iPhone apps, and that there will be a low level of user acceptance.
post #66 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by heathsnow View Post

I can't seem to get ANY virtual machine to run for long before they begin to use 100% of one of my CPUs. I've tried VMWare Fusion, Parallels, and Virtual Box. All seem to eventually max my CPU and stop working or work VERY slowely. I have to resort to booting into my Boot Camp partition to work in Windows XP. I only need XP to use Remote Desktop Connection for remote connection to work. Does anyone know of a MAC client I can use for this, that supports Terminal Services Gateway?

RDP for mac... CoRD is another. One of the Linux apps, rdesktop I believe runs perfectly on the Mac as well (X11).

http://www.microsoft.com/mac/product...p/default.mspx
post #67 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by -AG- View Post

I can sum up in a few words why flash is making such an issue on the 27" imacs only.

Its simple

People that have gone out and bought the 27" have done so because they want the latest and greatest. The iPenis as it were.

If they had plugged in their keyboards and the left hand side shift key made a clunking noise then you will hear about it on a blog and suddenly all the other "early adopters" out there start reporting they too now have the same issue.

But was it really an issue?

Probably not.... i mean im not saying that it wouldn't be annoying. But i wouldn't call it news worthy.

The same kinda thing is happening with flash. Remember when 10.6 came out all those months ago now and low and behold flash was running like a pig. Turned out that there was an older version running. That too made front page news. But why?

A few days later there was a flash patch and suddenly oh it works. Its par for the course.

In this case id say that there was probably an older patch installed of flash or maybe there is a clash with a driver to fun the "friggin huge" screen. Either way it will be patched sooner rather than later and these people will then have to find something else to bitch about.

Funny if it was hardware alone or software alone that the smaller 21.5" people don't seem to be making as much of a fuss about this.
This makes me lean towards the driver clash with the display drivers.

Bingo.
post #68 of 107
Introducing "Snow Leopard"

"iDelete"

The world's first operating system to automatically wipe out your data so you can free up space on your harddrives! No Windows have ever done such a thing before!

"Full support for Adobe Flash"

Apple makes both the software and hardware so we can make the best experience possible; in this case not being able to run Flash even though we charge you two times the price of comparable PC with the same hardware! That little netbook can play Flash, but your $2000 iMac cant!

It Just Works!

"Imagine That"
post #69 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Some random in no way paid by Redmond View Post

Introducing "Snow Leopard"

"iDelete"

The world's first operating system to automatically wipe out your data so you can free up space on your harddrives! No Windows have ever done such a thing before!

"Full support for Adobe Flash"

Apple makes both the software and hardware so we can make the best experience possible; in this case not being able to run Flash even though we charge you two times the price of comparable PC with the same hardware! That little netbook can play Flash, but your $2000 iMac cant!

It Just Works!

"Imagine That"

Wow thanks for that.

That added to the debate as much as this did.

Looks like we have another...

Internet TROLL.
post #70 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Porting does not always lead to disaster, but it almost always does when the developers port the conventions of the original platform to the new one. This doesn't have anything to do with Cocoa Touch or object oriented programming in general. The same problems would exist whether the native development environment were smalltalk or assembly language. Every user interface, just like every language, has a way of behaving, presenting information to a user and reacting to user input that is unique. It doesn't matter how good a job Adobe does translating Flash to Objective-C code, they can't translate those idioms and if the developers don't understand them, and use them, which most people looking to Flash as their ticket to an iPhone app won't, because they are looking for shortcuts and quick fixes, then the app won't work well on the platform. So there's every reason to believe that most of these Flash apps will generally not work well as iPhone apps, and that there will be a low level of user acceptance.

Your point is well taken; however, Apple has abstracted the API so far away from the hardware that most objective-C programmers don't understand the idioms of the iPhone hardware architecture. People who write firmware for microcontroller's do understand the hardware at its core. My point is this, what Apple has done with Cocoa Touch is wonderful because you don't need to understand the hardware inner-workings, you simply need to understand what the device can do; this is a programming environment at its best, this is what the competition is trying to accomplish.

This has everything to do with Cocoa Touch and object-oriented programming. A well formed collection of Frameworks such as this is exactly what is needed for a more transparent port...isn't this obvious? This is why Apple created Cocoa and Cocoa Touch....Exclusively for porting between platforms (desktop, laptop, mobile and soon slates). Now think ahead for a moment, lets think like Apple: Lets create a programming environment that allows non-Apple programmers to easily port their code...during the port, they discover the Apple tools and IDE and voila ....new Apple programmers....think about all the games, calculators and utilities...I know for a fact, that a majority of the early iPhone programmers were not Apple programmers...they had pre-existing source code that was easily ported to the iPhone because of Cocoa Touch...there are thousands of developers and more everyday from many platforms because of ease of portability........with this in mind, think of the port that Adobe did, with some of the most talented programmer's in the world.....Flash will be a smash hit......but hey, Ballmer laughed at the iPhone.....and many people see the demise of Flash.....lets see what happens.
post #71 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wakashizuma View Post

Introducing "Snow Leopard"

"iDelete"

The world's first operating system to automatically wipe out your data so you can free up space on your harddrives! No Windows have ever done such a thing before!

"Full support for Adobe Flash"

Apple makes both the software and hardware so we can make the best experience possible; in this case not being able to run Flash even though we charge you two times the price of comparable PC with the same hardware! That little netbook can play Flash, but your $2000 iMac cant!

It Just Works!

"Imagine That"

Like in politics, this guy keep out a few key facts:

The issue with Apple is limited to guest user accounts (less than 200 people have reported the issue).

No, Microsoft does not screw up their own customers (will we could debate, if Vista was not total screw job on consumers and Longhorn was on shareholders/investors), MS screws up T-mobile's 1 million plus customers because their did not practise the simplest of IT manangement procedures, always backup data when you install new updates.
Now screwing up few hundred people or 1 million plus, I wonder who is bigger screw-up to the public and shareholders. Oh yes because MS will be going to court wether, it is T-mobile or consumers, payment will be made for BIGGEST screw-up in consumer data HISTORY!!

The irony is MS was pushing the system restore feature in Windows OS to their consumers
post #72 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

...adobe has abandoned its mac user base years ago. if you look at the amount of products that adobe lists on their website, you can see that the tools that are critical to graphic designers on the mac are probably just 5 out of 100 or so. i don't know where adobe makes its money, but from their product list it looks like they see more value in supporting windows with cheap crap than in supporting high end mac software.. their flagship products are now windows first and the mac has turned into an afterthought

Absolutely agree!

Quote:
i think that apple should take a hard look at adobe and consider buying the lot.

I've stated the same here at AI in other threads... multiple times (sorry!)

Quote:
can you imagine how many graphics people would buy high end mac pros if the mac versions would get preferential treatment at an apple owned adobe? i don't know if they could shut down windows development altogether, but they could certainly prioritize the todo lists of their most talented people.

The graphics industry i.e. publishing, print, media and advertising has supported Apple from the get-go. Without our contribution in the early years (1984-1999), may I dare say that Apple would have folded BEFORE their successful venture into consumer computing. Adobe, Macromedia, and Quark were the software cornerstones for Apple in the day. Now there's only Adobe... and to a lesser degree Quark (did THEY ever screw up!)... and they have most obviously went Windows-first in their development.

Quote:
the same graphics whores that switched to windows in the 90s would certainly buy new shiny boxes from apple if that's where their tools would run the best.

...I can call and describe myself with the above epitaph, but it sounds sooo condescending reading it from someone else... but it still made me laugh!

Quote:
i also think that adobe's product line could use some of that minimalist obsession that mr jobs is so famous for.

I've also stated the same. Funny how Adobe originally built their programs using the strict GUI guidelines from Apple, then ported those same popular and productive GUIs to Windows, creating the most sought after and stolen photo editor in the process... and then decided that the "Apple GUI" wasn't good enough. The response to their recent GUI changes have been less than complimentary from both Mac and/or Windows users.

Quote:
as for flash - if apple owned it, i'm sure it could get optimized for the mac, replaced by Quicktime on the video front, open sourced, or killed outright. I certainly wouldn't miss it.

In all truthfulness, Flash in and of itself is great software. It's how it's used is the problem. Technically it was only meant to be an interface builder for manipulating images, animations, and later video. It's how Macromedia first, and later Adobe implemented video, that problems started to arise. I believe Apple could make the "Flash experience and performance" so much better using their own tech and Open Source tech.

I actually think that Adobe's investors would LOVE Apple to come courting, if not only because Adobe has definitely lost their focus IMO, and because there are a ton of synergies to be exploited. Culling the software overlap alone would save Adobe and Apple millions... maybe billions, in reduced marketing and R&D costs.

Actually, the near future is the time for Apple to make it's move if ever, because with less than double-digit market-share (still... but for how long?), Apple could get through any attempts to block it due to anti-competitive or monopoly issues.

In the end, it would revert to being the same Mac vs.PC sales argument started in 1984: Apple=media and content creation/manipulation... PC=office back-end, organization, and processes... and let's not forget Über-GAMERS! <--How did THAT ever happen? What strange bedfellows those 2 market segments make!

Regardless, Apple and the Mac will still be the platform of choice for professionals in the industry. I can't count the number of photogs, printers, agencies, etc. here in Germany that have switched "Back to Mac" (as I did), or have switched, over the last few years. However, they are ALL gnashing their teeth over the Adobe dilemma though. Mainly because CS could be sooo much better taking it's cues from Apple, and Adobe returning to their roots so-to-speak.

Sorry for the long post... did I say I was a "passionate" Graphics Whore? <-- Titles should be capitalized
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #73 of 107
guys, its NOT JUST flash thats the issue..!

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=810722
post #74 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by -AG- View Post

Wow thanks for that.

That added to the debate as much as this did.

Looks like we have another...

Internet TROLL.

so on here truth about Apple, even if its negative means trolling...?

right got it
post #75 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

Like in politics, this guy keep out a few key facts:

The issue with Apple is limited to guest user accounts (less than 200 people have reported the issue).

No, Microsoft does not screw up their own customers (will we could debate, if Vista was not total screw job on consumers and Longhorn was on shareholders/investors), MS screws up T-mobile's 1 million plus customers because their did not practise the simplest of IT manangement procedures, always backup data when you install new updates.
Now screwing up few hundred people or 1 million plus, I wonder who is bigger screw-up to the public and shareholders. Oh yes because MS will be going to court wether, it is T-mobile or consumers, payment will be made for BIGGEST screw-up in consumer data HISTORY!!

The irony is MS was pushing the system restore feature in Windows OS to their consumers

data restored..

http://www.internetnews.com/mobility...uits+Filed.htm
post #76 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archipellago View Post

guys, its NOT JUST flash thats the issue..!

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=810722

I not sure if i should reply to this, I could pick thousands of faulty issues with 10 different PC manufactures on their PCs releases and point you to numerous other forums.

Again show me the number of 27" iMacs that have been purchased and the number of faulty iMac returns/issues/displeased customers and then maybe I will listen to you.

It is easy to found a number of people, who are not happy, does that mean every consumer who buys the product will found a fault!

Show me statistical signifcance, significant ternd in terms of faulty 27" iMacs and then maybe I listen to you.
post #77 of 107
I have to wonder if the issue with Flash on these iMacs is not with Flash itself, but with an underlying issue with a small number of iMacs in general. Flash, being such a huge resource hog, would likely be the first thing many would notice if the system as a whole was having issues. The proverbial canary in the mine, if you will.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #78 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archipellago View Post

data restored..

http://www.internetnews.com/mobility...uits+Filed.htm

Piece of advisce before you post a link, actually read it properly.
My points are clearly shown in the link you provided.

1. Not all the data was restored, hmm that different from what you posted "data restored", no mate its almost all data restored, get it right!

2. Lawsuits are still going to happen!

Here what I am pointing to:

Microsoft today reports it recovered the majority of lost customer data for Sidekick owners amid a flurry of lawsuits filed yesterday over the recent server failure caused a service outage and data loss.

The software giant, which owns Danger, the company that provides online services for Sidekick on T-Mobile's network, will begin restoring personal data "as soon as possible," starting with contacts and moving on to other content.

"We are pleased to report that we have recovered most, if not all, customer data for those Sidekick customers whose data was affected by the recent outage. We will continue to work around the clock to restore data to all affected users, including calendar, notes, tasks, photographs and high scores, as quickly as possible," writes Roz Ho, vice president premium mobile experiences for Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT), in a statement issued today.

The service glitch was caused by a "system failure that created data loss in the core database and the back-up," according to Ho, who said Microsoft rebuilt the system "component by component, recovering data along the way."

I read last sentence again and you know that is BS, since it has been reported that MS were undertaking system updates, now its system failure that caused data loss in core database and the back-up. Who can smell BS and it is very STRONG!!
post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

Piece of advisce before you post a link, actually read it properly.
My points are clearly shown in the link you provided.

1. Not all the data was restored, hmm that different from what you posted "data restored", no mate its almost all data restored, get it right!

2. Lawsuits are still going to happen!

Here what I am pointing to:

Microsoft today reports it recovered the majority of lost customer data for Sidekick owners amid a flurry of lawsuits filed yesterday over the recent server failure caused a service outage and data loss.

The software giant, which owns Danger, the company that provides online services for Sidekick on T-Mobile's network, will begin restoring personal data "as soon as possible," starting with contacts and moving on to other content.

"We are pleased to report that we have recovered most, if not all, customer data for those Sidekick customers whose data was affected by the recent outage. We will continue to work around the clock to restore data to all affected users, including calendar, notes, tasks, photographs and high scores, as quickly as possible," writes Roz Ho, vice president premium mobile experiences for Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT), in a statement issued today.

The service glitch was caused by a "system failure that created data loss in the core database and the back-up," according to Ho, who said Microsoft rebuilt the system "component by component, recovering data along the way."

I read last sentence again and you know that is BS, since it has been reported that MS were undertaking system updates, now its system failure that caused data loss in core database and the back-up. Who can smell BS and it is very STRONG!!

piece of advice for you (hey look I can spell!)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8309218.stm

situation can change with time.

Lawsuits will happen because of the outage of the service not specifically the loss of data.


Can you hear Apple fessing up to problems with the iMac.??

***tumbleweed blows past***

just works..
post #80 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

I not sure if i should reply to this, I could pick thousands of faulty issues with 10 different PC manufactures on their PCs releases and point you to numerous other forums.

Again show me the number of 27" iMacs that have been purchased and the number of faulty iMac returns/issues/displeased customers and then maybe I will listen to you.

It is easy to found a number of people, who are not happy, does that mean every consumer who buys the product will found a fault!

Show me statistical signifcance, significant ternd in terms of faulty 27" iMacs and then maybe I listen to you.

read much..??

All I was saying is that other users are reporting issues with their iMacs that aren't flash related.

rest of your post is waffle and verbiage from a non existent argument.
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