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First-known iPhone worm 'Rickrolls' jailbroken Apple handsets - Page 2

post #41 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjs View Post

Make that 26,251,292... Dang. See how easy this social engineering is?

I know, just look at how many people have installed Google Desktop.
post #42 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

It doesn't matter what system you're on, if you open port 22 (ssh), or any port, actually, to the world, and leave default account names and passwords in place, you're asking for trouble. This is true of Macs, Linux, Windows, iPhones, your basic consumer network routers, etc.

...

My jailbroken iPhone is secure, and stable, thank you very much. I know the risks and the rewards, the blanket condemnations of jailbreaking are little more than FUD.

Unless your SSH installation requires RSA key authentication to login (i.e. not just a username and password) then your iPhone is still more than likely open to a number of known attacks that can be performed on an SSH server remotely, both brute force and DoS style.

It's not just strong passwords that save you.
post #43 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

This is most definitely the #1 reason not jailbreak the iPhone.

Followed closely by "stability issues".

Both of these methods have targeted people who failed to change their root password. If you jailbreak, change your root password, and are responsible with what software you install, the odds of encountering something like this are extremely slim. There are other risks, but I'll be surprised if they manifest to the jailbreak community with any sort of force.
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post #44 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

Both of these methods have targeted people who failed to change their root password. If you jailbreak, change your root password, and are responsible with what software you install, the odds of encountering something like this are extremely slim. There are other risks, but I'll be surprised if they manifest to the jailbreak community with any sort of force.

Stability issues have nothing to do with your choice of password.

And from my experience, running any single background process that wasn't intended to be run by Apple has a seriously detrimental effect on performance. What do you expect with only ~40MB of available RAM once the system has loaded on the 2G/3G iPhone.
post #45 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

Stability issues have nothing to do with your choice of password.

And from my experience, running any single background process that wasn't intended to be run by Apple has a seriously detrimental effect on performance. What do you expect with only ~40MB of available RAM once the system has loaded on the 2G/3G iPhone.

I was addressing the exploit itself.

That said, I have jailbroken numerous devices and I have not experienced any stability issues as a result. On the other hand, I have jailbroken iPhones for other people, and some of them have made their phones extremely unstable by taking an anything-goes approach to what they modify and install. It is a matter of making responsible choices. Should a person choose to use Backgrounder on one of the low-RAM devices they also need to keep this in mind as they decide what should or should not be running in the background. Obviously this is a much lesser concern on a 3GS. I think the main problem here is that there are people who lack some basic understanding of how the iPhone works who are also jailbreaking it and making poor performance choices after doing so.
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post #46 of 100
As 21-year-old unemployed programmer Ashley Towns hailing from Wollogong, Australia.
post #47 of 100
It's about common sense.

---------------------------------------

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3743

As designed by Apple, the iPhone OS ensures that the iPhone and iPod touch operate reliably. Some customers have not understood the risks of installing software that makes unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS ("jailbreaking") on their iPhone or iPod touch. Customers who have installed software that makes these modifications have encountered numerous problems in the operation of their hacked iPhone or iPod touch. Examples of issues caused by these unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS have included the following:


Device and application instability: Frequent and unexpected crashes of the device, crashes and freezes of built-in apps and third-party apps, and loss of data.

Unreliable voice and data: Dropped calls, slow or unreliable data connections, and delayed or inaccurate location data.

Disruption of services: Services such as Visual Voicemail, YouTube, Weather, and Stocks have been disrupted or no longer work on the device. Additionally, third-party apps that use the Apple Push Notification Service have had difficulty receiving notifications or received notifications that were intended for a different hacked device. Other push-based services such as MobileMe and Exchange have experienced problems synchronizing data with their respective servers.

Compromised security: Security compromises have been introduced by these modifications that could allow hackers to steal personal information, damage the device, attack the wireless network, or introduce malware or viruses.

Shortened battery life: The hacked software has caused an accelerated battery drain that shortens the operation of an iPhone or iPod touch on a single battery charge.

Inability to apply future software updates: Some unauthorized modifications have caused damage to the iPhone OS that is not repairable. This can result in the hacked iPhone or iPod touch becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone OS update is installed.

Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks the iPhone OS. It is also important to note that unauthorized modification of the iPhone OS is a violation of the iPhone end-user license agreement and because of this, Apple may deny service for an iPhone or iPod touch that has installed any unauthorized software.

------------------------------

Same can be said for hacking any piece of tech. If you want to "customize" beyond what manufacturer's guidelines (and implemented barriers) allow, then you take your chances. Doesn't mean there is absolutely no problem with what you are doing just because you happen to know how to do it. You're playing outside operating guidelines and hacking your device. It's pretty simple.
post #48 of 100
I've little sympathy for pepole who have jailbroken their iPhones having problems like this.

However, the fact that this is a story at all (it's made most of the major news outlets) is an interesting demonstration of the success Apple are having. They are becoming the target worth aiming for because of the size of their installed base, much like M$ are for desktop systems. It's going to be interesting to find out if OSX really is more secure, as Apple have always claimed, or if it was relative obscurity that kept Mac users safe, as M$ fans claim.

Personally, I suspect Apple will be OK.
post #49 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

Unless your SSH installation requires RSA key authentication to login (i.e. not just a username and password) then your iPhone is still more than likely open to a number of known attacks that can be performed on an SSH server remotely, both brute force and DoS style.

It's not just strong passwords that save you.

Which is why I said:

Quote:
...and turn off the ssh server when you don't actually need it running.

Thus limiting your exposure to any of the attack methods.
post #50 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

This is most definitely the #1 reason not jailbreak the iPhone.

Followed closely by "stability issues".

None of that is true. Stability issues can happen from installing unauthorized apps after you jailbreak, but jailbreaking alone doesnt make your device less stable or less secure.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SS3 GokouX View Post

Misleading.

This exploit requires the user to jailbreak their phone and install SSH through Cydia/whatever. Id imagine most people would never install SSH. The article makes it sound like every jailbroken iPhone is vulnerable to this exploit.

I bolded to make sure this point is not missed.


Quote:
Originally Posted by foljs View Post

Excuse me if I'm wrong, but this seems like a programmer's failure to me, not an end user one.

Most of the jailbreaking is done with programs that run on your Mac or PC and automate the process. The end user can be completely clueless about what happens under the surface.

So, why don't these programs also ASK THE USER to provide a password at jailbreaking time, and then set the SSH to use it on installation?

Why do they rely on the default password and an obscure warning to the user to "change it later"? End users using these tools don't know what an SSH server is.

Another thing that software can automate and programmers forgot to take advantage of.

Ultimately its the users fault, but the ease in which one can jailbreak, unlock and install other packages I can see why someone would click the SSH install and not think twice about it. I would imagine that OpenSSH will likely do something that has a GUi to optionally change the password when you turn it on.

People need to keep it turned off by default, too. Even if locked out, seeing the port at all is a potential security risk.
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post #51 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

On the other hand, ssh can be very nice to have on your iPhone, if you have servers you sometimes need to get into while you are at, say, the beach.

You do not need to jailbreak to get and use an SSH client - there are plenty of SSH clients in the official Apple AppStore.

Installing an SSH Server (sshd) on your phone is primarily so you can then connect and login as root over a wifi connection - hence why it doesn't lock out root by default.
post #52 of 100
Jailbreaking enables security flaws and pirates!

Watch out you don't get Rick Roll'd.

http://www.theiphoneblog.com/2009/11...word-rickroll/

If you Jailbreak you need to change your SSH password.

Congratulations Jailbreakers, if this hits the mainstream media your hobby could cost Apple millions, especially as they are just breaking into enterprise markets.

Lets hope they lock it down harder next time to stop you clowns pulling stunts like this.

The Jailbreakers f%@^ed up, if they are going to open SSH access to people's iPhone's the least they could have done is IMPOSED A BETTER SECURITY POLICY on jailbroken iPhone users, not some half-assed default user and default password (alpine) which doesn't require changing on first use.
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post #53 of 100
I don't mind if people want to jailbreak their phones and I don't think Apple should make any special efforts to stop it.

But an OS should be designed to be secure, a side-effect of which is that no-one would be able to jailbreak their phone.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #54 of 100
This problem is only with unknowledgeable jailbreakers, not with jailbreakers at large or the iPhone. There is even an App Store developer in trouble for snagging contacts, but Apple’s model is setup to deal with such eventualities. The Android NDK and Marketplace are innately much less secure. If the platform becomes successful, which I think it will, I think we’ll see trojan horse apps, worms and viruses explode on Android. I hope I’m wrong.
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post #55 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

jailbreaking = making your own iPhone vulnerable, deliberately. It's self-hacking.

So where's the risk to the average user?

How is it really news that people who hack their iPhones (against Apple's recommendations) are getting into trouble because of it? Pehaps it's useful to warn them of the obvious . . .


That's funny. I assume you also have a Mac, which runs an OS quite similar to iPhone, but the edition on Mac comes jail-broken from the manufacturer (the same Apple that spreads the FUD about jailbreaking iPhone).

I am sure the control freak SJ would love to get all applications on Mac OS X to be distributable only through iTunes AppStore, if there is no such annoyance as 95% market dominance of the company considered to be "evil empire".
post #56 of 100
Perhaps you would be better off leaving the "control freak" environment of the iPhone and take up one of Google's offerings, I'm sure the companies that pay them for advertising are itching to get their hands on information about everything web-based you do and everyone you know who is in your contacts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

That's funny. I assume you also have a Mac, which runs an OS quite similar to iPhone, but the edition on Mac comes jail-broken from the manufacturer (the same Apple that spreads the FUD about jailbreaking iPhone).

I am sure the control freak SJ would love to get all applications on Mac OS X to be distributable only through iTunes AppStore, if there is no such annoyance as 95% market dominance of the company considered to be "evil empire".
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post #57 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

None of that is true. Stability issues can happen from installing unauthorized apps after you jailbreak, but jailbreaking alone doesnt make your device less stable or less secure.

Very clever, but it's just semantics at the end of the day.

Quote:
Ultimately its the users fault, but the ease in which one can jailbreak, unlock and install other packages I can see why someone would click the SSH install and not think twice about it. I would imagine that OpenSSH will likely do something that has a GUi to optionally change the password when you turn it on.

People need to keep it turned off by default, too. Even if locked out, seeing the port at all is a potential security risk.

Yes, but to be fair, SSH as a server has no place on a mobile phone.
post #58 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Jailbreaking enables security flaws and pirates!

Watch out you don't get Rick Roll'd.

http://www.theiphoneblog.com/2009/11...word-rickroll/

If you Jailbreak you need to change your SSH password.

Congratulations Jailbreakers, if this hits the mainstream media your hobby could cost Apple millions, especially as they are just breaking into enterprise markets.

Lets hope they lock it down harder next time to stop you clowns pulling stunts like this.

The Jailbreakers f%@^ed up, if they are going to open SSH access to people's iPhone's the least they could have done is IMPOSED A BETTER SECURITY POLICY on jailbroken iPhone users, not some half-assed default user and default password (alpine) which doesn't require changing on first use.

You don't seem to understand much about Jailbreaking or who this effects. A normal iPhone doesn't have SSH access, neither does a Jailbroken one until the person who owns the phone themselves downloads an app to enable SSH, and then they enable it. At that time the username and password are root and alpine.

What this thing does, is it searches for a phone that has SSH enabled, and accesses the files. It can only do this if
1. The person jailbroke.
2. The person enabled SSH.
3. Thy person never changed the password for SSH nor did they turn it off when not in use.

Unless you jailbreak, there is no way this can hurt your phone or affect you.

For the record, I've been Jailbreaking my iPhone and iPod Touch since 1.2, and never once have I used it to pirate an App. I don't even use dTunes anymore since we were allowed to DL music from iTunes over 3G. Jailbreaking is much less relevant now since 3.0 came out, but in the 1.x and 2.x days it allowed me to do tons of things regular stock iPhones could not. Right now I use it for themes and SB settings mainly, although there are several other things I like to do with it such as haptic feedback and new SMS chirps.
post #59 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

jailbreaking = making your own iPhone vulnerable, deliberately. It's self-hacking.

So where's the risk to the average user?

How is it really news that people who hack their iPhones (against Apple's recommendations) are getting into trouble because of it? Pehaps it's useful to warn them of the obvious . . .



in some ways I put this on the same list as the folks that got the trojan from torrenting iwork.

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(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #60 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

This problem is only with unknowledgeable jailbreakers, not with jailbreakers at large or the iPhone. ...

Isn't this the same as the old (deeply flawed), argument about it's not the guns it's the criminals *using* the guns?

The fact is that jail-breaking exists, and it's for the most part a one click operation that is promoted and encouraged by tech sites like this one (and many others).

Sure you can say that a responsible, knowledgeable, person who decides to jail-break their phone is not going to be a problem, but the reality is that the broad availability of the jail breaking process virtually guarantees a whole lot of idiots running around with jail-broken phones and using them for nefarious and stupid purposes.

Responsible owners of AK-47's and glocks are not a problem either, but the fact that any punk can buy one almost anywhere in the US and that there are multiple millions in circulation virtually guarantees a lot of death and destruction.

There's freedom, and there's irresponsible idiocy. Rational people usually go for something between the two.
post #61 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Isn't this the same as the old (deeply flawed), argument about it's not the guns it's the criminals *using* the guns?

Not at all, because very specific things have to happen. First, they have to jailbreak their iPhone or Touch, but that alone will not allow this worm to enter your phone. Second, they have had to installed and turned on OpenSSH, which is not installed by default. Only when those two things are done without the user being wise enough to then change the root password will this backdoor" be unlocked.
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post #62 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Not at all, because very specific things have to happen. First, they have to jailbreak their iPhone or Touch, but that alone will not allow this worm to enter your phone. Second, they have had to installed and turned on OpenSSH, which is not installed by default. Only when those two things are done without the user being wise enough to then change the root password will this “backdoor" be unlocked.

Well I was talking in more general terms, but I don't think even this specific example invalidates my argument.

The prevalence and ease of jail-breaking in general and it's use by perhaps "irresponsible" or non-technical users, combined with the existence of an SSH app that installs root by default and requires action by this same hypothetical, non-technical, "dumb", or irresponsible user to turn off the threat by changing their password is a recipe for disaster.

I would just repeat my assertion that while jail-breaking by itself, in the hands of a capable, responsible user is not not technically dangerous, the prevalence of it, the ease of use, and the fact that it's basically being put in the hands of idiots makes the phenomenon of jail-breaking overall a sort of scourge. I'm arguing that completely outside of this issue of the SSH worm, jail-breaking is a problem in general (in regards security and criminality), for those reasons.

In other words the reality is quite different from the theory, just as it is in the gun ownership metaphor I was using to illustrate.
post #63 of 100
I think your post is kind of nonsensical overall, but this part sticks out the most.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post

... there are several other things I like to do with it such as haptic feedback and new SMS chirps.

Other than making the phone vibrate, there is no haptic feedback on the iPhone. It's a hardware feature that cannot be achieved through a software hack.

If you're talking about an app that makes the phone vibrate when you press a key on the screen, that's not haptic feedback. Haptic feedback has to do with proprioception and touch feedback loops. Just having the phone vibrate is not at all the same thing.
post #64 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I think your post is kind of nonsensical overall, but this part sticks out the most.
Other than making the phone vibrate, there is no haptic feedback on the iPhone. It's a hardware feature that cannot be achieved through a software hack.

If you're talking about an app that makes the phone vibrate when you press a key on the screen, that's not haptic feedback. Haptic feedback has to do with proprioception and touch feedback loops. Just having the phone vibrate is not at all the same thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia

Haptic technology refers to technology that interfaces to the user via the sense of touch by applying forces, vibrations, and/or motions to the user[1].

Apparently it does count as haptic feedback, albeit a very basic form from what I understand.

I'd like to understand what was so nonsensical in my post about the subject at hand though however, and clear up what I was trying to say if you had a hard time understanding.
post #65 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by slu View Post

And Apple has these "locks" not to protect you, but to protect themselves. They want you locked into the App Store. Apple is out to protect it's investment.

Now don't get me wrong, i don't mind the concept of jail-breaking in order to expand functionality. If ppl are comfortable with the process and maintenance required, go for it. I just don't see what is wrong with apple protecting their investment - they are under no obligation to make it an open environment, it's their ecosystem.
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post #66 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Perhaps you would be better off leaving the "control freak" environment of the iPhone and take up one of Google's offerings, I'm sure the companies that pay them for advertising are itching to get their hands on information about everything web-based you do and everyone you know who is in your contacts.

Where is your paranoia medication for today ?

I talked about a different thing : Mac OS X is "jail-broken" by default and nobody considers this as security problem. The only reason iPhone is different is to lock you to using AppStore and it is really funny to see people be parrots of Apple's reasoning there.
post #67 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

This problem is only with unknowledgeable jailbreakers, not with jailbreakers at large or the iPhone. There is even an App Store developer in trouble for snagging contacts, but Apples model is setup to deal with such eventualities. The Android NDK and Marketplace are innately much less secure. If the platform becomes successful, which I think it will, I think well see trojan horse apps, worms and viruses explode on Android. I hope Im wrong.

Is it just you wanting Android to fail or you have any evidence to back your claim ? I don't think Android Market is that much less secure. There is no review process, this is left to community (reviews). But there are means to make you responsible for any malcontent as it is with the AppStore. Since the applications you submit to AppStore are not in the source code form, it is quite possible to fool the reviewer, so you are not on the completely safe side with iPhone either.
BTW : Android NDK is quite limited (sandboxed...there are no APIs exposed) so it is quite impossible to write any kind of virus using NDK.
post #68 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Not at all, because very specific things have to happen. First, they have to jailbreak their iPhone or Touch, but that alone will not allow this worm to enter your phone. Second, they have had to installed and turned on OpenSSH, which is not installed by default. Only when those two things are done without the user being wise enough to then change the root password will this backdoor" be unlocked.

Same goes for the gun, you have to put bullets in it and point it at somebody and pull the trigger to shoot them.

Basically this is NOT a news story at all really, just some traffic grabbing headline that is only barely related to the actual problem.
post #69 of 100
If you don't want to submit to a "control freak" you don't have to, the decision, as a consumer is yours.

Which of the 37 fart applications I noticed in the Android market do you think would be best?

Do you think paying for one is worthwhile if it gets rid of the ads?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

Where is your paranoia medication for today ?

I talked about a different thing : Mac OS X is "jail-broken" by default and nobody considers this as security problem. The only reason iPhone is different is to lock you to using AppStore and it is really funny to see people be parrots of Apple's reasoning there.
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post #70 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

I talked about a different thing : Mac OS X is "jail-broken" by default and nobody considers this as security problem. The only reason iPhone is different is to lock you to using AppStore and it is really funny to see people be parrots of Apple's reasoning there.

Jailbroken refers to the iPhone OS working in a way other than intended by Apple. As a result, Mac OS X cannot be considered Jailbroken as it functions as Apple intended.

Jail-broken !== open

Jail-broken === broken
post #71 of 100
Release the hounds.

Australian admits creating first iPhone virus

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...09/2737673.htm


Australian web designer spreads iPhone virus

http://www.news.com.au/technology/st...014239,00.html

Mixed response to Astley iPhone virus

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/m...1110-i74f.html

more

I hope you jailbreaking bozo's are satisfied, Joe Average will take two words from all these headlines:- iPhone Virus but will he bother reading deeper into the story?
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post #72 of 100
I can't believe I missed this article. This is the funniest damn thing I've heard of in a while.

Oh and CONSPIRACY THEORY TIME

Apple's been trying so hard to keep people from jailbreaking their iphones, and running apps they actually want to run. Who's to say they didn't pay a guy to pay a guy to pay a guy to use inside information FROM APPLE to create a non-malicious worm as a warning, then release the source code as a scare to keep everyone off jailbreaking.

I seriously would not put it past them.

Jailbreaking your iphone because you want to be able to what you want with your property? YOU'RE GOING DOWN.

That's what you get for going with Apple when you should have gone with Windows Mobile. To everyone who doesn't want to jailbreak and sees no benefit at all, you obviously made the right choice in going with an iphone lol.
post #73 of 100
Oh, yes because Apple really wants the words "virus" and "iPhone" to be associated in the average punters head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I can't believe I missed this article. This is the funniest damn thing I've heard of in a while.

Oh and CONSPIRACY THEORY TIME

Apple's been trying so hard to keep people from jailbreaking their iphones, and running apps they actually want to run. Who's to say they didn't pay a guy to pay a guy to pay a guy to use inside information FROM APPLE to create a non-malicious worm as a warning, then release the source code as a scare to keep everyone off jailbreaking.

I seriously would not put it past them.

Jailbreaking your iphone because you want to be able to what you want with your property? YOU'RE GOING DOWN.

That's what you get for going with Apple when you should have gone with Windows Mobile. To everyone who doesn't want to jailbreak and sees no benefit at all, you obviously made the right choice in going with an iphone lol.
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post #74 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I can't believe I missed this article. This is the funniest damn thing I've heard of in a while.

Oh and CONSPIRACY THEORY TIME

Apple's been trying so hard to keep people from jailbreaking their iphones, and running apps they actually want to run. Who's to say they didn't pay a guy to pay a guy to pay a guy to use inside information FROM APPLE to create a non-malicious worm as a warning, then release the source code as a scare to keep everyone off jailbreaking.

I seriously would not put it past them.

Jailbreaking your iphone because you want to be able to what you want with your property? YOU'RE GOING DOWN.

...and then publicizes them how to stay jailbroken and avoid the hole by changing your SSH password...not really much upside for Apple there. I would certainly put it past them. They aren't stupid enough to think there would be any benefit to such a ploy. Just a little critical thought would show that. Conspiracy theories are only fun if they make even a little bit of sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

That's what you get for going with Apple when you should have gone with Windows Mobile.

Well, that has to win for funniest line of the thread. Should have gone with the sinking ship? Should have gone with the archaic platform? Should have gone with ketchup and mustard on my cake.

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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #75 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Release the hounds.

Australian admits creating first iPhone virus

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...09/2737673.htm


Australian web designer spreads iPhone virus

http://www.news.com.au/technology/st...014239,00.html

Mixed response to Astley iPhone virus

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/m...1110-i74f.html

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I hope you jailbreaking bozo's are satisfied, Joe Average will take two words from all these headlines:- iPhone Virus but will he bother reading deeper into the story?

What exactly do 'jailbreaking bozos' have to do with lazy reporters, sensationalist, ignorant headlines and people too illiterate to read the story associated with the headline?

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #76 of 100
Perception is reality, without jailbreaking there would be no headlines screaming "iPhone Virus" period.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

What exactly do 'jailbreaking bozos' have to do with lazy reporters, sensationalist, ignorant headlines and people too illiterate to read the story associated with the headline?
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #77 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

If you don't want to submit to a "control freak" you don't have to, the decision, as a consumer is yours.

Which of the 37 fart applications I noticed in the Android market do you think would be best?

Do you think paying for one is worthwhile if it gets rid of the ads?

Same applies to you. Don't like the fart applications, don't buy them. There is plenty of other applications in the Market, that are very useful but they are impossible to create/get into AppStore.

Anytime it is not customer who makes the choice, something is wrong. We'll see how this approach will work for Apple in the long run, if more users will follow the path you suggested.
post #78 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Oh, yes because Apple really wants the words "virus" and "iPhone" to be associated in the average punters head.

It's not virus and iphone. It's worm and jailbreak. Think about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

...and then publicizes them how to stay jailbroken and avoid the hole by changing your SSH password...not really much upside for Apple there. I would certainly put it past them. They aren't stupid enough to think there would be any benefit to such a ploy. Just a little critical thought would show that. Conspiracy theories are only fun if they make even a little bit of sense.

They didn't publicize it. Someone else showed how to avoid the attack.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

Well, that has to win for funniest line of the thread. Should have gone with the sinking ship? Should have gone with the archaic platform? Should have gone with ketchup and mustard on my cake.

Actually the funniest thing is your lack of understanding of plain English. Here's my point (didn't think it needed explaining actually): If you want to jailbreak your iphone so you can have the freedom to do what you want, run what you want, customize what you want, you sound like Windows Mobile is more up your alley. If you're fine with not having those said options, a non-jailbroken iphone is perfect for you.

So really, before you talk about something you obvious don't know much about, check the arrogant attitude. Also, if WM was a sinking ship, why would HTC be coming out with such an amazing phone like the Leo? It's right around the corner for the states... Oh, didn't know about the Leo? Figures. Know only about what you own, but assume about things you don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Perception is reality, without jailbreaking there would be no headlines screaming "iPhone Virus" period.

Without Apple's decision making on your behalf, there wouldn't be a need for jailbreaking.

It's a shame the lengths at which people must go, just to do what they want with something they think they own lol
post #79 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

If you don't want to submit to a "control freak" you don't have to, the decision, as a consumer is yours.

Which of the 37 fart applications I noticed in the Android market do you think would be best?

Do you think paying for one is worthwhile if it gets rid of the ads?

Now I can make fart noises without ads!

what ever happened to the classic double handed mouth farts? We need apps for these now?
post #80 of 100
Perhaps you'd like to inform the 300+ news sites which come up in a search involving "iPhone" and "virus" about how they are wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

It's not virus and iphone. It's worm and jailbreak. Think about it.

Apple didn't make my decision to buy an iPhone, I did, if I wanted something to mess with I could have got a WinMo phone and headed over to XDA developers or a Symbian phone, Android phone or whatever.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Without Apple's decision making on your behalf, there wouldn't be a need for jailbreaking.

It's a shame the lengths at which people must go, just to do what they want with something they think they own lol
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
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