or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple takes wraps off of Upper West Side store in New York
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple takes wraps off of Upper West Side store in New York

post #1 of 86
Thread Starter 
Apple Thursday gave a first look at its new New York City store located on Broadway at 67th street, set to officially open to the public this Saturday at 10 a.m.

The store will be home to a "highly trained team" of more than 200 employees. The impressive building at 1981 Broadway features a unique curved glass roof and glass front. The storefront is 54 feet tall, 75 feet wide and 30 feet deep.

"We opened our first store in Manhattan seven years ago, and the response has been incredible," said Ron Johnson, Apples senior vice president of Retail. "We hope our new store on the Upper West Side will become as much a part of the community as our stores in SoHo, the Meatpacking District and on Fifth Avenue."

The first 2,500 visitors to the store on Friday will receive a limited edition commemorative t-shirt.

Gary Allen at ifoAppleStore was present at the store Wednesday night after Apple removed a graphic that was concealing the glass storefront. It revealed a single stone-walled room lit by ceiling lights at night, and flooded with sunlight during the day.

The ground-level space includes four rows of display tables, and a spiral glass staircase leading down to a lower level. Allen said the size and scale of the store eclipses that of any previous Apple store.









More photos and information are available at ifoAppleStore.

Gothamist was at Thursday's press event, and offers a number of photos from inside the new store.





Speaking at an event at the new store Thursday morning, Johnson said that the company realized their stores were too small, so all future locations will be at least "three tables wide." According to Gizmodo, the company also plans to accelerate its opening of stores next year, with 50 new locations set to debut in 2010.

The Mac maker also plans to have more "significant stores" that attract attention, like its flagship locations in New York City -- in particular the 5th Ave. store covered by a glass cube and open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Johnson said that more than 10,000 people applied to work at the new Upper West Side store, though only about 200 were hired. The average Apple store sells about $26 million, or $4,300 per square foot.

The growth of Apple's stores has been impressive. Johnson said that the entire company did $5.4 billion in sales in 2001, while the stores alone have sold $6.6 billion in 2009. The company's total 2009 sales reportedly amount to $36.5 billion.

Last week, Apple announced that its stores would allow a new "Reserve and Pick Up" option via its retail Web site, allowing customers to reserve products online and pick them up in the store. The new system aims to allow holiday shoppers the ability to ensure their products will be available for them to purchase between Dec. 15 and Dec. 24.
post #2 of 86
Looks incredible.. Love the night-photo.
post #3 of 86
West siiiiiiide!!!!!
post #4 of 86
apple strikes again. Microsoft can only dream of replicating a tenth of apple's retail success.
post #5 of 86
Premium stores for premium products that even the rest of us can aspire to.
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #6 of 86
Seems like a massive amount of empty (vertical) space to me. Being all glass, I can only imagine what the HVAC and cleaning bills will be.
post #7 of 86
OOOoooooohhhh- a glass box!
Only Apple could invent that. We've never seen the likes of those hinged glass plates before in Manhattan.

Those employees better be "highly trained" - those Upper West Siders can be demanding as hell. I know cause I lived up there for 3 years.
Jerry Seinfeld lives not far from there.
post #8 of 86
OMG...it's...BEAUTIFUL!
iPhone 4 32GB (black), iPod touch 32GB, iPad Wi-Fi + 3G 64GB, iPod classic 80 GB (white) 160GB (black), 2x 5th gen iPod 30GB (black + white), iMac 27", MacBook Pro 17", Time Capsule 1TB, Apple TV
Reply
iPhone 4 32GB (black), iPod touch 32GB, iPad Wi-Fi + 3G 64GB, iPod classic 80 GB (white) 160GB (black), 2x 5th gen iPod 30GB (black + white), iMac 27", MacBook Pro 17", Time Capsule 1TB, Apple TV
Reply
post #9 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

Premium stores for premium products that even the rest of us can aspire to.

.....AFFORD!!!! ( I couldn't resist)
post #10 of 86
It almost looks unbalanced. The structure is tall, has partial walls on the inside with nothing on the upper 2/3, and just looks sparse.

I think the interior layout works in mall stores with a lower ceiling but here the inside looks more like an afterthought.
You win, I've switched sides.
Reply
You win, I've switched sides.
Reply
post #11 of 86
I thought it was a little to sterile looking, but I suppose it would fit the image of uptown.
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #12 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

.....AFFORD!!!! ( I couldn't resist)

One might never be in a position to walk into a Porsche dealership and say "I'll have that GT3 over there" but with a little motivation and going without, one could aspire to a new Mac each year or two. \

Techstud, you shouldn't allow yourself to be taken in so easily!

Take care.
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #13 of 86
It's obnoxious, wasteful, doesn't fit in with the 'hood, etc. WTF? They're going from small boutiques to MS style excess. So much for zen minimalism and being green.
2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
Reply
2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
Reply
post #14 of 86
I don't understand why they didn't add a staircase and a second level, there's clearly room for it upwards
post #15 of 86
My question is, where does the glass staircase lead to? Evidently it's a room under the main floor, but for what?

EDIT: Looks to me that the checkout counter and 3rd party accessories area is probably on the lower level... but why would they require people go downstairs and then back up? Weird.
post #16 of 86
This store uses the iPod Touch POS system.
post #17 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

It's obnoxious, wasteful, doesn't fit in with the 'hood, etc. WTF? They're going from small boutiques to MS style excess. So much for zen minimalism and being green.


Glass is very recyclable.
post #18 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

It's obnoxious, wasteful, doesn't fit in with the 'hood, etc. WTF? They're going from small boutiques to MS style excess. So much for zen minimalism and being green.

It's right around the corner from Lincoln center, so it actually fits in fairly well.
post #19 of 86
What do you mean doesn't fit into the hood. This store is just north of the Lincoln Center Art Complex, across the street from a three story Barnes and Noble, and across from a four story movie theater.

There's nothing but large buildings, art campuses, and large retail complexes right where that store is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

It's obnoxious, wasteful, doesn't fit in with the 'hood, etc. WTF? They're going from small boutiques to MS style excess. So much for zen minimalism and being green.
post #20 of 86
Downstairs are most of the computers, the check out counter, the genius bar, and accessories. The lower level floor space is larger than upstairs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

My question is, where does the glass staircase lead to? Evidently it's a room under the main floor, but for what?

EDIT: Looks to me that the checkout counter and 3rd party accessories area is probably on the lower level... but why would they require people go downstairs and then back up? Weird.
post #21 of 86
The glowing all-glass front and curved canopy plus the larger-than-life scale give it the look of a modern and grand stage or theater, which I think is perfectly suited for the neighborhood.

The article says the store is opening Saturday morning - so why does it then say the first visitors ON FRIDAY are getting commemorative tshirts?
post #22 of 86
Looks like a cathedral

(ducks)

:-)
post #23 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

What do you mean doesn't fit into the hood. This store is just north of the Lincoln Center Art Complex, across the street from a three story Barnes and Noble, and across from a four story movie theater.

There's nothing but large buildings, art campuses, and large retail complexes right where that store is.

He has a point. It does look pretty garish for that residential neighborhood actually. It's very Columbus Circle looking.
post #24 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

He has a point. It does look pretty garish for that residential neighborhood actually. It's very Columbus Circle looking.

I'm starting to think you don't actually live in NYC. If you actually do, you really need to get out more, maybe to the opera, ballet or symphony.
post #25 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beauty of Bath View Post

Looks like a cathedral

(ducks)

:-)

You're so right! What a crazy cleaning bill that roof will have. Especially with NYC pigeons
post #26 of 86
I'm still not sure if I'm willing to accept 67th St as Upper West Side. Honorary member maybe. Call me when Apple hits 110th.
post #27 of 86


Broadway and Amsterdam in the middle of the Lincoln Center area is not a intimate residential street. Its a large and garish area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

He has a point. It does look pretty garish for that residential neighborhood actually. It's very Columbus Circle looking.
post #28 of 86
There was a time when 'Bricks & Morter' operations were given their 'last rights' (er...right before the tech bubble, I think!)

Apple does it again...reinvents an industry! $4,300/SF that's a retailer's dream!
post #29 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beauty of Bath View Post

Looks like a cathedral

(ducks)

:-)

I've seen the new design for the stores going up next year and they are all going to be giant cubes with a different primary colour on each side like a single piece of rubic's cube. Inside will be one giant room.

The staff will all be wearing long white robes with fake beards and each will have a staff with a similar but smaller cube on the top loaded with mysterious circuits that can be used to check out items, and fix computers etc.
post #30 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I'm starting to think you don't actually live in NYC. If you actually do, you really need to get out more, maybe to the opera, ballet or symphony.

*imagines teckstuf at the ballet with hayseed in mouth and puzzled expression on his face*
post #31 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

Seems like a massive amount of empty (vertical) space to me. Being all glass, I can only imagine what the HVAC and cleaning bills will be.

Doesn't matter. Try to imagine the SALES that store is going to generate, which is the whole (most of the) idea.

Don't discount the value of aesthetics. The Fifth Ave. "Cube" store is proof of that.

Apple is doing far more than peddling their goods. They're setting standards for how companies and retail operations should do business--AND doing it in a recession.

They're also investing in neighborhoods and communities with significant architectural works of art.

Daniel Swanson

Reply

Daniel Swanson

Reply
post #32 of 86
It's very dramatic but I can see where the people who say it looks a little sterile are coming from.

May be deep maroon carpets, cherry wood tables and warmer lighting would do the trick! I don't mind the glass so much.

You should see the High schools being built around here in Phoenix, AZ. No windows. They look like cyanide factories!

'The architecture we get is the architecture we deserve.' Can't remember who said that but I think he was a famous architect!
post #33 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

Seems like a massive amount of empty (vertical) space to me. Being all glass, I can only imagine what the HVAC and cleaning bills will be.

I was thinking about that too. When the sun hits that baby, talk about being in a wave amplification chamber!

We don't know the details of the design, but I'd be willing to bet you that heating/cooling the place will be easy, and efficient. Obviously heating should be easy. Most of the time, the sunshine will do a fine job of that. Cooling could actually be super slick too - depending on the design. The sheer volume of the space helps. Most of the heat will stay in the upper, unoccupied portion of the building. If the ceiling vents, and if cool underground air flows into the lower floor, they will have a mighty efficient convection cooled building.

As for materials, I don't know many items that are more 'green' than glass, aluminum, and stone. Good job Apple, it's an amazing looking building, and hopefully efficient.
post #34 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post

Doesn't matter. Try to imagine the SALES that store is going to generate, which is the whole (most of the) idea.

Don't discount the value of aesthetics. The Fifth Ave. "Cube" store is proof of that.

Apple is doing far more than peddling their goods. They're setting standards for how companies and retail operations should do business--AND doing it in a recession.

They're also investing in neighborhoods and communities with significant architectural works of art.

Good points! Especially, 'They're setting standards for how companies and retail operations should do business--AND doing it in a recession.'
post #35 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

It's obnoxious, wasteful, doesn't fit in with the 'hood, etc. WTF? They're going from small boutiques to MS style excess. So much for zen minimalism and being green.

How wrong can anyone be?! Spacious is a good thing--not "wasteful". You expect them to sell out of a closet? Read the article. They realized their store are too small. They have the means to change that, and are. That's a good thing. There's nothing UNgreen about wood, glass, and concrete--especially when whatever was there before was FAR less green.

And the only thing obnoxious here is YOU.

Daniel Swanson

Reply

Daniel Swanson

Reply
post #36 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post



Broadway and Amsterdam in the middle of the Lincoln Center area is not a intimate residential street. Its a large and garish area.

Is Lincoln Center a mall. NO.
post #37 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by manfrommars View Post

I'm still not sure if I'm willing to accept 67th St as Upper West Side. Honorary member maybe. Call me when Apple hits 110th.

Uhm, 110th St isn't the UWS, despite what the realtors may tell you. The location is smack in the heart of the UWS.
post #38 of 86
Impressive! I suppose when you make more money per square foot than any retailer you can afford to make your stores more visually appealing.

IMO, these stores have had the biggest effect on the Mac sales increase.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #39 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

He has a point. It does look pretty garish for that residential neighborhood actually. It's very Columbus Circle looking.

No he doesn't, and it isn't garish. It's a work of art. It's stunning and beautiful and will be one of their most successful stores.

Apple's got NYC nailed!

Daniel Swanson

Reply

Daniel Swanson

Reply
post #40 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytdave View Post

I was thinking about that too. When the sun hits that baby, talk about being in a wave amplification chamber!

We don't know the details of the design, but I'd be willing to bet you that heating/cooling the place will be easy, and efficient. Obviously heating should be easy. Most of the time, the sunshine will do a fine job of that. Cooling could actually be super slick too - depending on the design. The sheer volume of the space helps. Most of the heat will stay in the upper, unoccupied portion of the building. If the ceiling vents, and if cool underground air flows into the lower floor, they will have a mighty efficient convection cooled building.

As for materials, I don't know many items that are more 'green' than glass, aluminum, and stone. Good job Apple, it's an amazing looking building, and hopefully efficient.

Good point(s)! I hadn't thought about that! I knew the glass design was very dramatic and I also knew how recyclable glass is but hadn't thought about heating and cooling efficiency. Should have guessed Apple would have some high priced designers working this angle as well.

As you say, 'Good job, Apple!'
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple takes wraps off of Upper West Side store in New York