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Bill Gates praises Steve Jobs for saving Apple

post #1 of 221
Thread Starter 
When asked about Steve Jobs in a TV special that aired this week, Bill Gates said the Apple co-founder has shown "more inspiration" than any other leader in the tech industry.

The program "Warren Buffett and Bill Gates: Keeping America Great" aired Thursday night on CNBC. The "Town Hall Event" featured questions from the audience directed towards two of the world's richest men.

One audience member asked Gates, to laughter from the audience, what his thoughts were on Jobs and the work he has done as CEO of Apple. The Microsoft founder had fond words for his rival.

"Well, he's done a fantastic job," Gates said. "Apple is in a bit of a different business where they make hardware and software together. But when Steve was coming back to Apple, which was actually through an acquisition of NeXT that he ran, Apple was in very tough shape. In fact, most likely it wasn't going to survive."

He continued: "And he brought in a team, he brought in inspiration about great products and design that's made Apple back into being an incredible force in doing good things. And it's great to have competitors like that. We write software for Apple, Microsoft does. They compete with Apple. But he, of all the leaders in the industry that I've worked with, he showed more inspiration and he saved the company."



In 2007, both Gates and Jobs sat down side-by-side for an interview with Walt Mossberg of The Wall Street Journal at the D5 conference. In that talk, both influential technology leaders were complimentary of one another.

Jobs credited Gates for being the first to build a company solely around software, rather than depending on customized software. Gates responded by crediting Apple's populist approach with Jobs at the helm.

In that interview, Gates revealed that Microsoft shifted away from developing software for the Mac around the time of Jobs' departure, a move made mostly due to his absence.

"We worried that Apple wasnt differentiating itself from the other platformsWindows and DOS," Gates said in 2007. "The product line just didnt evolve the way it needed to. Certainly not the way it would have if Steve had been there."

As the Microsoft co-founder noted in his comments on CNBC this week, though the company still competes with Apple, it also continues to write software for the Mac platform. Next year, Microsoft plans to release Office 2010 for Mac, with a new version of Outlook based on Cocoa, the development layer of Mac OS X.
post #2 of 221
That's right, Bill.

Now thank Steve for all the inspiration he provided you for Windows.
post #3 of 221
Fair enough comments, kind of gracious actually. If only Steve Balmer was the same.
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #4 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

That's right, Bill.

Now thank Steve for all the inspiration he provided you for Windows.

SSSSSSSssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss.

More like all the inspiration Bill provided Steve in making a fortune.
post #5 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Fair enough comments, kind of gracious actually. If only Steve Balmer was the same.

SoMehow the word gracious doesn't quite come to mind when thinking of Steve Ballmer, no matter what the setting.
post #6 of 221
Now he tells us. I have always been amused by Bill's virtual inability to describe anything positively without the use of the words "fantastic" and "incredible." I see he hasn't picked up any new vocabulary. Anyway, possibly a back-of-the-hand to Steve Ballmer? It could certainly be read that way.
Please don't be insane.
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post #7 of 221
Yes, I think Gates is pretty gracious too. Dare I say it but I think it comes easier to Bill than to Steve to say these types of things.

As to Ballmer... nahhh, not gonna happen!
post #8 of 221
Nice article about people actually being nice to each other for a change. Happy Holidays to all! Thanks.
post #9 of 221
2 indisputable geniuses of Tech! If Bill Gates didn't step down, MSFT would be $200+ too. His only mistake was trusting Steve "the Bonehead" Ballmer.
post #10 of 221
It's always nice when rivals nick ideas, but then forget about it when they're together.
post #11 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


More like all the inspiration Bill provided Steve in making a fortune.

for real - what does that even mean? First of all, most of Jobs' fortune is in Disney, not Apple. Second of all, most of Jobs' Appel-based fortune is directly due to the success of the iPod and iPhone, which Gates and MS had absolutely nothing to do with.

Par for the course with another baseless teckdud comment.
post #12 of 221
Well of course Thief Billy Goat the Troll has to express appreciation for Apple, the Source from which Microsoft steals their copying.

M$ is primarily a copying company, after all.

That Steve Jobs learned to accept the Thief M$ always nipping at his heels and move beyond that albatross speaks to what a high-minded and great man Steve Jobs has become.
post #13 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

SSSSSSSssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss.

More like all the inspiration Bill provided Steve in making a fortune.

What the hell does that even mean?
post #14 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ Web View Post

2 indisputable geniuses of Tech! If Bill Gates didn't step down, MSFT would be $200+ too. His only mistake was trusting Steve "the Bonehead" Ballmer.

I don't think so. Gates often gets too much credit. Much of the culture we see at Microsoft today was his creation. Steve Blamer didn't make it any better, but I'm not sure he made it much worse.
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post #15 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ Web View Post

2 indisputable geniuses of Tech! If Bill Gates didn't step down, MSFT would be $200+ too. His only mistake was trusting Steve "the Bonehead" Ballmer.

microsoft at $200 makes them a $1.7 Trillion company. That's trillion, with a T. Exaggeration much?
post #16 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

for real - what does that even mean? First of all, most of Jobs' fortune is in Disney, not Apple. Second of all, most of Jobs' Appel-based fortune is directly due to the success of the iPod and iPhone, which Gates and MS had absolutely nothing to do with.

Par for the course with another baseless teckdud comment.

Well what did the statment I was responding to mean?

As for baseless- ask yourself - when exactly did Bill Gates make his fortune and how large is it. 'nuff said.
post #17 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

What the hell does that even mean?

Well what does yours mean?
post #18 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I don't think so. Gates often gets too much credit. Much of the culture we see at Microsoft today was his creation. Steve Blamer didn't make it any better, but I'm not sure he made it much worse.

Microsoft has been asleep at the wheel for so long, on so many fronts, it's hard to pinpoint blame at this point.
post #19 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Well what does yours mean?

Well what do you think it means??

It means that without Apple, Windows wouldn't be nearly as usable as it is today. In fact without Apple, the entire tech industry would still be in the Dark Ages. MS follows Apple. The industry at large follows Apple. MS got all their ideas from Apple and continues to do so, even making headlines about it!
post #20 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Well what did the statment I was responding to mean?

As for baseless- ask yourself - when exactly did Bill Gates make his fortune and how large is it. 'nuff said.

The statement you were responding to, "Now thank Steve for all the inspiration he provided you for Windows" is pretty obvious. It claims, like a recent MS exec admitted, that Windows draws heavily from OSX. They can issue a press release retracting the execs comments all they want, but that doesn't change the fact that Windows trails OSX in innovation and "look and feel."

Gates and Jobs were both multi-millionaires by the mid-80's, if not much earlier. What's your point?
post #21 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

SSSSSSSssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss.

More like all the inspiration Bill provided Steve in making a fortune.

TechDud, in another thread I said it was possible that people might take you for a fool. Now I can see why they should.
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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post #22 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Well what do you think it means??

It means that without Apple, Windows wouldn't be nearly as usable as it is today. In fact without Apple, the entire tech industry would still be in the Dark Ages. MS follows Apple. The industry at large follows Apple. MS got all their ideas from Apple and continues to do so, even making headlines about it!

its like we're hamsters running on a treadmill trying to get through to Teckdud. Painful.
post #23 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

Microsoft has been asleep at the wheel for so long, on so many fronts, it's hard to pinpoint blame at this point.

True story. The problem with the Microsoft culture IMO is that they succeeded in such a huge way so quickly that they began to believe their own propaganda, which includes an expectation to win every time. On the technical side, they ran out of ways of leveraging the OS (and smack into the antitrust laws), and they didn't have much of a Plan B. Still don't. Microsoft turned out to be a one or two trick pony (depending on how you count). They were a couple of good tricks, but still a company has to continue learning new tricks or they're not going to be a force for long.
Please don't be insane.
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post #24 of 221
Say what you will about his company and his products, but Bill Gates is a classy guy. Always has been. You also have to recognize the dramatic good that his money (and the money that Warren Buffett decided to entrust him with) is doing. I recognize that his wealth came from a monopoly, but so what: it could have been put to far worse uses (e.g.,buying sports teams and fiddling around with entrepreneurial trivia).
post #25 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Say what you will about his company and his products, but Bill Gates is a classy guy. Always has been. You also have to recognize the dramatic good that his money (and the money that Warren Buffett decided to entrust him with) is doing. I recognize that his wealth came from a monopoly, but so what: it could have been put to far worse uses (e.g.,buying sports teams and fiddling around with entrepreneurial trivia).

Oh boy. Sorry, I know too much about Bill and his history to think he's ever been a "classy guy." The stories of him screwing his friends and partners are legion. In the way he conducted his business, he makes Steve Jobs look like Mother Theresa. It's great that he's giving a lot of his fortune away now, but even so, the foundation is run with a lot of his control freak tendencies.
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post #26 of 221
Free publicity for Apple straight from Winman numero uno...

I bet Michael Dell cringed after hearing Bill praise El Jobso...
post #27 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Say what you will about his company and his products, but Bill Gates is a classy guy. Always has been. You also have to recognize the dramatic good that his money (and the money that Warren Buffett decided to entrust him with) is doing. I recognize that his wealth came from a monopoly, but so what: it could have been put to far worse uses (e.g.,buying sports teams and fiddling around with entrepreneurial trivia).

Wow- I couldn't agree with you more.
Great post.
post #28 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Say what you will about his company and his products, but Bill Gates is a classy guy. Always has been. You also have to recognize the dramatic good that his money (and the money that Warren Buffett decided to entrust him with) is doing. I recognize that his wealth came from a monopoly, but so what: it could have been put to far worse uses (e.g.,buying sports teams and fiddling around with entrepreneurial trivia).

I agree with you that Gates is not all bad. But "classy"? I don't think I can go that far.

Did you see the interview with Mossberg they're talking about? During that, Gates complained about the "I'm a Mac" campaign and how everybody hates the PC guy. Jobs and the journalist tried to comfort him that everybody loves the PC guy, and like a petulant child Gates said something like: "Maybe his mother loves him".

I for one interpreted that as the richest man in the world whining about being unloved. Indeed, Bill Gates has some fabulous strengths and good qualities, but he's not well adjusted enough for me to call him "classy".
post #29 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

its like we're hamsters running on a treadmill trying to get through to Teckdud. Painful.

it's called the ignore list- you can surely figure out how to use it and ease your pain.
post #30 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

its like we're hamsters running on a treadmill trying to get through to Teckdud. Painful.

It really is okay to ignore him and not reply to his posts.
post #31 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Well what do you think it means??

It means that without Apple, Windows wouldn't be nearly as usable as it is today. In fact without Apple, the entire tech industry would still be in the Dark Ages. MS follows Apple. The industry at large follows Apple. MS got all their ideas from Apple and continues to do so, even making headlines about it!

You left out Bill Gates and how and how much money he's made and what's he's done with it.
post #32 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Oh boy. Sorry, I know too much about Bill and his history to think he's ever been a "classy guy." The stories of him screwing his friends and partners are legion. In the way he conducted his business, he makes Steve Jobs look like Mother Theresa. It's great that he's giving a lot of his fortune away now, but even so, the foundation is run with a lot of his control freak tendencies.

Classy?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Microsoft

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates was called "evasive and nonresponsive" by a source present at a session in which Gates was questioned on his deposition.[2] He argued over the definitions of words such as "compete", "concerned", "ask", and "we".[3] BusinessWeek reported, "Early rounds of his deposition show him offering obfuscatory answers and saying 'I don't recall' so many times that even the presiding judge had to chuckle. Worse, many of the technology chief's denials and pleas of ignorance have been directly refuted by prosecutors with snippets of E-mail Gates both sent and received."[4] Intel Vice-President Steven McGeady, called as a witness, quoted Paul Maritz, a senior Microsoft vice president as having stated an intention to "extinguish" and "smother" rival Netscape Communications Corporation and to "cut off Netscape's air supply" by giving away a clone of Netscape's flagship product for free. The Microsoft executive denied the allegations.[5]

A number of videotapes were submitted as evidence by Microsoft during the trial, including one that demonstrated that removing Internet Explorer from Microsoft Windows caused slowdowns and malfunctions in Windows. In the videotaped demonstration of what Microsoft vice president James Allchin's stated to be a seamless segment filmed on one PC, the plaintiff noticed that some icons mysteriously disappear and reappear on the PC's desktop, suggesting that the effects might have been falsified.[6] Allchin admitted that the blame for the tape problems lay with some of his staff "They ended up filming it -- grabbing the wrong screen shot," he said of the incident. Later, Allchin re-ran the demonstration and provided a new videotape, but in so doing Microsoft dropped the claim that Windows is slowed down when Internet Explorer is removed. Mark Murray, a Microsoft spokesperson, berated the government attorneys for "nitpicking on issues like video production."[7] Microsoft submitted a second inaccurate videotape into evidence later the same month as the first. The issue in question was how easy or hard it was for America Online users to download and install Netscape Navigator onto a Windows PC. Microsoft's videotape showed the process as being quick and easy, resulting in the Netscape icon appearing on the user's desktop. The government produced its own videotape of the same process, revealing that Microsoft's videotape had conveniently removed a long and complex part of the procedure and that the Netscape icon was not placed on the desktop, requiring a user to search for it. Brad Chase, a Microsoft vice president, verified the government's tape and conceded that Microsoft's own tape was falsified.[8]

Corporate thievery, false evidence/testimony, abuse of monopoly. All under Bill Gates.

Real class.
post #33 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

If you have all this knowledge could you share some of it with us by using some actual facts.

To imply Bill Gates is more of control freak then Steves Jobs is just funny.

And you never hear him bringing politics into his company.
post #34 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Classy?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Microsoft

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates was called "evasive and nonresponsive" by a source present at a session in which Gates was questioned on his deposition.[2] He argued over the definitions of words such as "compete", "concerned", "ask", and "we".[3] BusinessWeek reported, "Early rounds of his deposition show him offering obfuscatory answers and saying 'I don't recall' so many times that even the presiding judge had to chuckle. Worse, many of the technology chief's denials and pleas of ignorance have been directly refuted by prosecutors with snippets of E-mail Gates both sent and received."[4] Intel Vice-President Steven McGeady, called as a witness, quoted Paul Maritz, a senior Microsoft vice president as having stated an intention to "extinguish" and "smother" rival Netscape Communications Corporation and to "cut off Netscape's air supply" by giving away a clone of Netscape's flagship product for free. The Microsoft executive denied the allegations.[5]

A number of videotapes were submitted as evidence by Microsoft during the trial, including one that demonstrated that removing Internet Explorer from Microsoft Windows caused slowdowns and malfunctions in Windows. In the videotaped demonstration of what Microsoft vice president James Allchin's stated to be a seamless segment filmed on one PC, the plaintiff noticed that some icons mysteriously disappear and reappear on the PC's desktop, suggesting that the effects might have been falsified.[6] Allchin admitted that the blame for the tape problems lay with some of his staff "They ended up filming it -- grabbing the wrong screen shot," he said of the incident. Later, Allchin re-ran the demonstration and provided a new videotape, but in so doing Microsoft dropped the claim that Windows is slowed down when Internet Explorer is removed. Mark Murray, a Microsoft spokesperson, berated the government attorneys for "nitpicking on issues like video production."[7] Microsoft submitted a second inaccurate videotape into evidence later the same month as the first. The issue in question was how easy or hard it was for America Online users to download and install Netscape Navigator onto a Windows PC. Microsoft's videotape showed the process as being quick and easy, resulting in the Netscape icon appearing on the user's desktop. The government produced its own videotape of the same process, revealing that Microsoft's videotape had conveniently removed a long and complex part of the procedure and that the Netscape icon was not placed on the desktop, requiring a user to search for it. Brad Chase, a Microsoft vice president, verified the government's tape and conceded that Microsoft's own tape was falsified.[8]

Corporate thievery, false evidence/testimony, abuse of monopoly. All under Bill Gates.

Real class.

Leftist propoganda. Conspiracy theorists all written above on wiki.
post #35 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

TechDud, in another thread I said it was possible that people might take you for a fool. Now I can see why they should.

Without Bill Gates' phenomenal success do you really think SJ would have been as propelled at vengeance as has been well documented over and over again? And I'm a fool?
post #36 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Leftist propoganda. Conspiracy theorists all written above on wiki.



Ok, let's just play along then.

Tell us exactly which ones are "conspiracy theorists" - even though this is all in the trial transcripts.



References

^ http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10005379-16.html
^ Gates deposition called evasive - CNET News.com
^ CNN - Gates deposition makes judge laugh in court - November 17, 1998
^ 11/30/98 MICROSOFT'S TEFLON BILL
^ Washingtonpost.com: WashTech - U.S. v. Microsoft Special Report
^ http://www.chguy.net/news/feb99/demoMS.html
^ Feds Accuse MS of Falsification
^ Compaq: It Was All a Big Mix-Up
^ Microsoft Antitrust Trial C
^ Open Letter on Antitrust Protectionism: The Independent Institute
^ a b U.S. v. Microsoft: Court's Findings of Fact
^ Lohr, Steve; Joel Brinkley (January 6, 1999). "Pricing at Issue As U.S. Finishes Microsoft Case". The New York Times. Retrieved 17 November 2008.
^ Judiciary Policies And Procedures: Codes Of Conduct
^ Microsoft Judge Ripped in Court
^ Judge Jackson Exits Microsoft Discrimination Case
^ I, Cringely . The Pulpit . The Once and Future King | PBS
^ The Microsoft Case
^ Microsoft Consent Decree Compliance Advisory - August 1, 2003 : U.S. v. Microsoft
^ ATR-SV-DIV401;MDE;15906;7
^ Policy Forum: The Business Community's Suicidal Impulse
^ Jean-Louis Gassée on why PC manufacturers don't sell non MS products
[edit]Bibliography

Andrew Chin, Microsoft: A First Principles Approach, 40 Wake Forest Law Review 1 (2005)
Kenneth Elzinga, David Evans, and Albert Nichols, United States v. Microsoft: Remedy or Malady? 9 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 633 (2001)
John Lopatka and William Page, Antitrust on Internet Time: Microsoft and the Law and Economics of Exclusion, 7 Supreme Court Economic Review 157-231 (1999)
John Lopatka and William Page, The Dubious Search For Integration in the Microsoft Trial, 31 Conn. L. Rev. 1251 (1999)
John Lopatka and William Page, Who Suffered Antitrust Injury in the Microsoft Case?, 69 George Washington Law Review 829-59 (2001)
Alan Meese, Monopoly Bundling In Cyberspacec: How Many Products Does Microsoft Sell ? 44 Antitrust Bulletin 65 (1999)
Alan Meese, Don't Disintegrate Microsoft (Yet), 9 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 761 (2001)
Page, William H. and John E. Lopatka (2009). The Microsoft Case: Antitrust, High Technology, and Consumer Welfare. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 9780226644646.
Alan Reynolds, The Microsoft Antitrust Appeal, Hudson Institute (2001)
Steven Salop and R. Craig Romaine, Preserving Monopoly: Economic Analysis, Legal Standards, and the Microsoft Case, 7 Geo. Mas. L. Rev. 617 (1999)
Howard A. Shelanski and J. Gregory Sidak, Antitrust Divestiture in Network Industries, 68 University of Chicago Law Review 1 (2001)
[edit]External links

Final Judgment in U.S. v. Microsoft (injunction including final settlement terms approved by the court) (note that the copy posted on the district court's web site is actually an earlier version that the court declined to approve).
The United States DOJ's website on U.S. v. Microsoft
Wired news timeline of the Microsoft antitrust case
ZDnet story on 4th anniversary of Microsoft antitrust case
ZDnet story on proposed concessions
Antitrust & the Internet: Microsoft case archive
"A Case of Insecure Browsing" by Andrew Chin. Raleigh News & Observer, September 30, 2004
Bill Gates deposition video at Microsoft on August 27, 1998 (Windows Media, ogg Theora and ogg Vorbis formats)
The Center for the Advancement of Capitalism
post #37 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Say what you will about his company and his products, but Bill Gates is a classy guy. Always has been. You also have to recognize the dramatic good that his money (and the money that Warren Buffett decided to entrust him with) is doing. I recognize that his wealth came from a monopoly, but so what: it could have been put to far worse uses (e.g.,buying sports teams and fiddling around with entrepreneurial trivia).

Couldn't agree more.
post #38 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Classy?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Microsoft

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates was called "evasive and nonresponsive" ......

Corporate thievery, false evidence/testimony, abuse of monopoly. All under Bill Gates.

Real class.

I think you're being too harsh. Many corporate CEOs would would be similarly evasive and dissembling (e.g., Steve Jobs with options backdating) - in these types of settings, it goes way beyond himself, since he has to worry about the implications of his words and their consequences on other corporate stakeholders.

"Thievery"? "False evidence"? Those are pretty serious charges: DoJ never found that. "Monopoly?" Of course. I already alluded to that. But the point of my original post was, what matters now is what he has done with his monopoly rents
post #39 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Without Bill Gates' phenomenal success do you really think SJ would have been as propelled at vengeance as has been well documented over and over again? And I'm a fool?

Vengeance?

Microsoft first introduced Windows in November 1985 as an add-on to MS-DOS in response to the growing interest GUIs.

The first Macintosh was introduced on January 24, 1984. The first commercially successful personal computer to feature a mouse and a GUI.

I'm not sure where "vengeance" comes in. If you're referring to SJ's return in the late 90s, then I'm not really sure what motivated him, other than his acquisition of NeXT, his passion for tech, and the enduring promise of the Macintosh. By that time Apple and MS had been competitors for a long time. Seems to have been enough "vengeance" to go around for everyone.
post #40 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by delreyjones View Post

I agree with you that Gates is not all bad. But "classy"? I don't think I can go that far.

Did you see the interview with Mossberg they're talking about? During that, Gates complained about the "I'm a Mac" campaign and how everybody hates the PC guy. Jobs and the journalist tried to comfort him that everybody loves the PC guy, and like a petulant child Gates said something like: "Maybe his mother loves him".

I for one interpreted that as the richest man in the world whining about being unloved. Indeed, Bill Gates has some fabulous strengths and good qualities, but he's not well adjusted enough for me to call him "classy".

If whining and petulance were negatives, I don't think Mother Teresa would be a Mother Teresa.
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