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Google outlines Chrome OS plans for netbooks

post #1 of 120
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Google hosted a technical introduction to its new Chrome OS today, which it expects to officially launch on new netbooks by the end of 2010.

First unveiled as a initiative in July, Google's Chrome OS was broadly outlined to be a fast launching, secure, stripped down operating system aimed at replacing Windows on netbooks.

The web browser as an operating system

Dashing any hopes that Chrome OS would become a sophisticated operating system to directly rival Mac OS X and Windows 7, Google outlined today that its Chrome OS will simply be its Chrome browser optimized to run on a specialized Linux kernel. All apps on the new systems will be web applications launched within their own sandbox. There will be no native apps.

Google first focused attention on the traction it has gained with its Chrome web browser, noting that the fast new WebKit browser recent exceeded 40 million users worldwide. Net Applications says Chrome grabbed a 3.8% share of global browser use in October, establishing it solidly in fourth place behind Safari, Firefox and the Internet Explorer after just short of a year of availability.

The company says it will release an official Mac version of the Chrome browser by the end of this year, and is working on a Linux version that will serve as the foundation of the Chrome OS. Essentially, the "new OS" will be the Chrome browser running on a stripped down Linux core.

Similar to Android, which is also hosted on the Linux kernel, the platform itself will not be the typical Linux GNOME/KDE X11 desktop but rather the Chrome browser itself. While Android is primarily a modified mobile Java platform, Chrome OS will be a web platform based on HTML5.

The result will be a broad platform for HTML5 web apps that can run on Windows PCs, Macs, iPhones and other smartphones with HTML5 savvy browsers, as well as new dedicated hardware devices running the Chrome OS. Google said it has been working hard on making web apps work as well as native apps, with access to system resources such as the GPU for fast graphics.



Introduction to Chrome OS

In its event, Google focused on speed, simplicity and security as core features of the Chrome OS plan. "We want Chrome OS to be blazingly fast, basically instant-on," said Sundar Pichai, Googles VP of Product Management.

"In Chrome OS, every application is a web application," Pichai said. "There are no native applications. That gives us simplicity. It's just a browser with a few modifications. And all data in Chrome OS is in the cloud.

"This is key, we want all of personal computing to work this way. If you lose your machine, you just get a new one, and it works. With security, because everything is a web app, we can do different things. No system is ever fully secure. With Chrome OS there's no user install binaries, so we can see bad things easier. We run completely inside the browser security model."

From startup, Google demonstrated Chrome OS booting to its login screen in 7 seconds, with another three seconds to load a web application. And while the user interface is still in flux, Google is working to keep things simple by retaining most of the look and feel of Chrome browser, adding only "panels" as lightweight windows that don't move, useful for things like chat buddy lists and media playback.

Pichai referred to Microsoft's web based Office as the killer app for Chrome OS, eliciting laughs from the audience. He also demonstrated YouTube playback and viewing graphics and PDFs within browser tabs.

Inside the Chrome OS

Matthew Papakipos, the engineering director for Chrome OS, took the stage next to present the new operating system's technical side. "We want this to feel much more like a television than a computer," he said, noting that Chrome OS appliances will all be based on solid-state storage (like the iPhone) rather than using mechanical hard disks (like many more conventional netbooks currently do).

Papakipos said that the Chrome OS gains boot speed by cutting out lots of the conventional startup process common to PCs, including a hardware search for available drives and other devices, and the initiation of background services. The system launches from a read only boot partition with "Verified Boot," and automatically updates itself with any available security patches.

This automatic installation of web-based software is similar to Palm's webOS and updates for Windows that occur by default, and a marked departure from systems that allow the user to exercise control over when and how their software is updated, as Apple does on the Mac and iPhone. Google has already raised some eyebrows by automatically loading updates for desktop PC software without telling the user, a practice that it has since backpedaled on in response to user complaints.

Individual web apps are handled as sandboxed applications, with each running in its own process unique to its browser tab. User data is all stored encrypted, so if the device is lost or stolen it can't be easily recovered. All data is also synced to the cloud, so it can be resynced to a new machine if the system itself is ever irretrievably lost.

Pichai returned to the stage to wrap up that Google will be working with hardware makers to develop new devices capable of running the Chrome OS, and noted that it will not be possible for existing Linux or Windows netback users to upgrade to the new OS; it will only be made available on new hardware.

He also noted that Google plans to back "slightly larger netbooks with full sized keyboards and big trackpads" rather than the types of machines currently available.

The potential impact of Chrome OS

On a conceptual level, the Chrome OS works a lot like the iPhone: rather than trying to be a conventional, general purpose PC, it supplies a stripped down experience on tightly customized hardware. Unlike the iPhone, which uses a mobile-optimized version of Apple's desktop Mac OS X, Google is floating Chrome OS as a platform for running web applications exclusively.

This makes Chrome OS more like Adobe's Flash Lite, albeit based on HTML5 rather than Flash. Like Flash, Google will have to figure out how to translate the desktop browser experience into mobile devices. Web content is already largely targeted to users with desktop-sized displays, so advancing either Flash or HTML5 on the desktop and mobile devices at the same time is a challenge.

Apple's solution to this quandary on the iPhone was to develop a browser experience that made desktop-centric content readily viewable, while also offering an iPhone-optimized web experience for developers who wanted to target the iPhone directly. While web access was and is critically important to the success of the iPhone, Apple has gained even more attention for its native SDK, which allows developers to sell self contained apps to iPhone users independent from the web browser.

Apple has largely ignored the conventional netbook market, leaving it to PC makers. Microsoft first embraced netbooks with a low cost version of Windows XP designed to suffocate the netbook market's initial rapid adoption of Linux. However, after witnessing the cannibalization of low end Windows PCs and notebooks by cheap netbooks, Microsoft outlined plans this summer to raise netbook prices using Windows 7.

A new low-cost push by Google to introduce another wave of even cheaper, stripped down devices running its web-centric, Linux-based operating system next year will likely sabotage Microsoft's efforts "readjust those prices north" as Steve Ballmer hoped. Instead, the mass market for low end devices will be dragged down further, forcing Microsoft to consider abandoning embedded web-based devices along with its music player and smartphone product lines being crushed by Apple's iPod and iPhone.

The remaining question is how will Chrome OS devices impact mainstream desktop PCs and Macs. Apple has already differentiated its Mac lineup to focus on iLife and Pro Apps that can't really be delivered using web apps. This has enabled the company to remain profitable despite the cutthroat pricing competition among PC makers on the low end.

However, for the vast majority of Windows PCs being used primarily to browse the web, access email, edit documents and other tasks that are already possible and popular to do via web apps, the arrival of Google's Chrome OS could result in a major makeover of the PC market.

This all happened before

This isn't the first time Microsoft's dominant position has been threatened by stripped down devices. Sun attempted to positioned Java-based terminals against Windows PCs in the late 90s, along with a wave of other efforts to deliver thin clients or "NCs" (network computers) as cloud-centric alternatives to the conventional desktop PC.

Apple's iMac was birthed from an effort within the company to create an NC, and it became one of the few non-Windows PCs to ever gain traction. Other attempts include 3Com's QNX-based Audrey, a web browsing appliance designed to sync up to the company's Palm OS devices, and Be Inc.'s effort to turn its BeOS into an internet appliance, which it licensed to Sony for use in the eVilla in 2001.

Customers didn't get enthused about web-only appliances a decade ago, but things might change with Google's efforts to push HTML5 as a strong foundation for more functional web apps. Today's users are familiar with Google's Gmail, Gtalk, Docs, and other web-based apps, so floating new hardware capable of running these kinds of tools may be far more successful than previous attempts.

Google has also gained the interest of PC hardware makers with Android, enabling it to muscle into what has long been turf controlled by Microsoft. By offering developers a free alternative to Windows licensing, Google will likely find a variety of hardware makers interested in pursing Chrome OS devices.

One aspect of its assault on Windows and Windows Mobile that Google has been pushing is the idea of sharing its ad revenues with hardware licensees when they agree to its terms for bundling Google's ad-supported apps, enabling it to offer its core operating system software for "less than free."

Without Google's massive leverage in web advertising and paid search, Microsoft won't be able match Google's "less than free" terms. Whether that will result in a complete restructuring of the PC market remains to be seen, but that question should get answered over the next two years.

post #2 of 120
Seems Google wants to push MS out of the low end.
post #3 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Seems Google wants to push MS out of the low end.

That seems to be the case with every aspect of Google’s business. Apple hits them high and Google hit’s them low.

I expect to see this OS take hold more on emerging markets with very weak HW with an emphasis on cheap computing appliances. For instance, getting cheap to free internet access with a cheaply bought or rented device like a cable box or cable modem is today. Most of the world’s users are without internet and with emerging markets Google has a change to take a huge bite out of Windows’ marketshare even while Windows’ install base is growing and MS is making more money off of Windows.

I am surprised that that video specifically stated that everything is on the cloud when one of the driving factors behind this as a viable alternative is HTML5’s DB capabilities, allowing for local storage, playing and editing of media and documents while offline. I fully expect to see a version of iTunes for this OS that is only HTML, CSS and JS before the launch next year. I feel that the iTunes Store Preview may be a piece of that puzzle. Apple can’t lose this huge potential market. If people get their first taste of computing without iTunes and can’t use an iDevice because of it then they may never go that route, which IMO makes this an important component for the future of Apple.
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post #4 of 120
quite nice! i will download!!!!
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post #5 of 120
Bring it on.
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post #6 of 120
Here is a link to the source code and instructions if you want to build it yourself…

http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/...ng-chromium-os
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post #7 of 120
This will definitely catch on. Google is a big name company. Google is now, both a verb and a noun. And that makes it popular and powerful.

Microsoft is about to be cut into size for the first time. How this is going to work on Apple computers is anybody's guess. Come to think of it, Apple computers are meant for more than web browsing. Should Apple worry about Chrome OS? Not at all...
post #8 of 120
Will people really want to load this on a computer?
On anything other than a $100 netbook? (when one arrives.)
I mean I dislike Microsoft as much as the next guy, but really?
post #9 of 120
I love the idea here of Chrome OS. Boot to web in a short amount of time. But here's how I see it. I don't think it will make a dent in MS, Apple, or any Linux pockets. I see this as a Secondary OS.

Think, you turn on your computer, and you are asked "Which OS do you want to boot?" If you are looking to do just web surfing, select Chrome and you are off to the races. I don't see it replacing any OS, just sit there by its side for the quick path to the internet. Heck, make it a FlashDrive OS and you have a quick path to the internet on any computer!

Its not about what Apps you can run, its about getting online fast.

(BTW: Apple doesn't compete in this arena. So why is this here?)
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post #10 of 120
I can see how this would appeal to the netbook market (but how long will that be around?) but being someone who runs multiple apps all day long there is now way I'd give up a fully loaded OS for a watered down browser window.
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post #11 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

Microsoft is about to be cut into size for the first time. How this is going to work on Apple computers is anybody's guess. Come to think of it, Apple computers are meant for more than web browsing. Should Apple worry about Chrome OS? Not at all...

I dont think so. Both companies OSes are focusing on consumers, but Google will be coming from the bottom up while Apple is focusing on the top with premium hardware sales. Some will find that netbooks are enough for them and ChromeOS will surely make netbooks and other cheap PCs seems faster than they really are, but they wont be directly competing with each other. Engadget already has an editorial about that
http://www.engadget.com/2009/11/19/e...t-what-i-need/ I will be installing it as a secondary OS on my MBP just to see how it works and if I can save considerable power by running it while on a flight or some other situation that requires me to conserve power. For basic web browsing sure, but for richer media it might not be null and void, expect for Adobes focus on 64-bit Flash for Linux and OS X still has a power sucking 32-bit Flash when running a 64-bit browser.
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post #12 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post


Its not about what Apps you can run, its about getting online fast.

True but most people use 'sleep mode' on their laptops/desktops so it only takes a few seconds to be up and running anyway.
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post #13 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

... I fully expect to see a version of iTunes for this OS that is only HTML, CSS and JS before the launch next year. ....

Seems like it could probably work right now with only minor re-jiggering. The parts of iTunes that aren't straight HTML use WebObjects which is basically Java. I bet they are porting a Chrome version of it as we speak and that there are no technical hurdles in the way.
post #14 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

... How this is going to work on Apple computers is anybody's guess. Come to think of it, Apple computers are meant for more than web browsing. Should Apple worry about Chrome OS? Not at all...

Chrome will be competing with Apple's mobile OS X and any web-based stuff like Chrome or WebOS is already kind of a sub-set of that functionality. I don't think they have anything to worry about at all.

As has been said, Apple's got the high end covered and their tablet will have dozens of times the horsepower of the devices Chrome is aiming at.

What I find interesting is that Chrome seems like a better OS, and the hardware it will eventually run on is cheaper and more powerful, than that one laptop per child nonsense we had to suffer through. distributing cheap netbooks with Chrome on it seems like a far better proposition for third world net access.
post #15 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DdubRes79 View Post

True but most people use 'sleep mode' on their laptops/desktops so it only takes a few seconds to be up and running anyway.

Sleep mode burns down the battery. Hibernate (which OS X goes into after a while of sleep) doesn't consume battery, but depending on how much RAM you have, can take a while to go into and come out of. I hope the goal of the Chrome OS is a 5 second boot time or less. Otherwise, putting a computer to sleep/hibernate will be quicker.

Another benefit is that you don't have all the other stuff running in the background. Just the browser. Can make the experience feel (dare I say) snappier!
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post #16 of 120
Maybe, but Im not even interested in using G-mail. I just barely stomach google search (usefulness has a way of outweighing privacy, I guess.)
The privacy issues alone turn me off. The limited use for it is the topper.
It is very interesting though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post

I love the idea here of Chrome OS. Boot to web in a short amount of time. But here's how I see it. I don't think it will make a dent in MS, Apple, or any Linux pockets. I see this as a Secondary OS.

Think, you turn on your computer, and you are asked "Which OS do you want to boot?" If you are looking to do just web surfing, select Chrome and you are off to the races. I don't see it replacing any OS, just sit there by its side for the quick path to the internet. Heck, make it a FlashDrive OS and you have a quick path to the internet on any computer!

Its not about what Apps you can run, its about getting online fast.

(BTW: Apple doesn't compete in this arena. So why is this here?)
post #17 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Will people really want to load this on a computer?
On anything other than a $100 netbook? (when one arrives.)
I mean I dislike Microsoft as much as the next guy, but really?

Doesn't look like a Premium experience, now does it?
post #18 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Maybe, but Im not even interested in using G-mail. I just barely stomach google search (usefulness has a way of outweighing privacy, I guess.)
The privacy issues alone turn me off. The limited use for it is the topper.
It is very interesting though.

So Chrome OS isn't for you. That's okay
Privacy would be a concern for me too. I would make sure it couldn't see any of my files on my computer. But what would concern me more would be directed advertising. I doubt we could install pop-up blockers and such, and most of the Ads we would get on the OS would be dictated by our browsing history. You make a very valid concern!
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post #19 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Doesn't look like a Premium experience, now does it?

I don't think this is aimed to replace your OS X "premium" experience. I think its a stand-alone deal. Its experience will be surfing the web. As long as it does that well, I would contend it would be a "premium" experience for what it is designed to do. Don't knock it until you've tried it! There's a version out there already. Download it and Ubuntu 9.10 (to compile) to give it a try and report back to us. I'll be doing the same!
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post #20 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post

I don't think it will make a dent in MS, Apple, or any Linux pockets. I see this as a Secondary OS.

Even as a secondary OS it can still make a dent in marketshare and installed base even if it doesnt affect anyones sales or growth. Look at the netbook market as an example. They have risen and Acer have jumped ahead of Apple in PC unit marketshare, yet Apple is unfazed in their own sales and profit.

Quote:
(BTW: Apple doesn't compete in this arena. So why is this here?)

Its of interest to the tech community. This site isnt just about Apple products. If you want to get pedantic about the nomenclature then anything new releases from Apple shouldnt be here because they arent insider information at that point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DdubRes79 View Post

I can see how this would appeal to the netbook market (but how long will that be around?) but being someone who runs multiple apps all day long there is now way I'd give up a fully loaded OS for a watered down browser window.

There are the cheap notebooks that could drop up to $50 in price just for WIn7 Starter Edition. Then there are emerging markets that could use a simple OS like this on a rented appliance no more powerful than a cable box with USB ports for a keyboard and mouse.
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post #21 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Seems like it could probably work right now with only minor re-jiggering. The parts of iTunes that aren't straight HTML use WebObjects which is basically Java. I bet they are porting a Chrome version of it as we speak and that there are no technical hurdles in the way.

The backend uses WebOjects the front end is Carbon on Macs, which I am sure theyll change to Cocoa for 2010s iPod Special Event in the fall with a new iTunes X name. It will also then be 64-bit. With iTunes 9 they switched the iTunes Store to render HTML, CSS and JS. That is one a major part of the puzzle if they want iTunes on Chrome OS. The other part is just making the rest of the interface work with the HW so you can sync your iDevice. Is there any way Apple is not working with Google to have this as a default setup? It helps Google push their OS, it helps Apple push their iTunes/iDevice environment, and it helps Google and Apple hit MS in the lower end of the OS market.
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post #22 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Even as a secondary OS it can still make a dent in marketshare and installed base even if it doesn’t affect anyone’s sales or growth.

Absolutely. And Google is wise to say "this is a secondary OS". Like Apple, it undersells what's possible even though some users will push it to the limits. It manages the media expectations well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Will people really want to load this on a computer?

I like the idea of sitting at ANY computer ANYWHERE, and getting my files, email, media etc. If this enables that then great. But I'll install the Chrome browser on my Mac and get it that way, rather than remove the MacOS!

It surprises me Google is targeting netbooks only. I'd have thought they could get 50% of the market if it just installs on all the old clunker machines... anything that runs Windows 98 to XP (but can't quite do Windows 7)

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

However, after witnessing the cannibalization of low end Windows PCs and notebooks by cheap netbooks, Microsoft outlined plans this summer to raise netbook prices using Windows 7.

Damn, I have to remember I'm reading RoughlyDrafted (on AppleInsider).
So, Microsoft outlined plans to raise netbook prices eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I fully expect to see a version of iTunes for this OS that is only HTML, CSS and JS before the launch next year. I feel that the iTunes Store Preview may be a piece of that puzzle. Apple can’t lose this huge potential market. If people get their first taste of computing without iTunes and can’t use an iDevice because of it then they may never go that route, which IMO makes this an important component for the future of Apple.

I agree, Apple needs to make sure it's in this game.

Google has so many fingers in so many pies, that if it pulls together it has a very compelling solution for most customers.

The missing piece is a Google iTunes app... Google has to be working on their own iTunes app that connects to multiple stores and multiple mp3 players. I guess if (when?) they release their own it is a declaration of war on Apple, so they may hold back a while longer.
post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post

I don't think this is aimed to replace your OS X "premium" experience. I think its a stand-alone deal. Its experience will be surfing the web. As long as it does that well, I would contend it would be a "premium" experience for what it is designed to do. Don't knock it until you've tried it! There's a version out there already. Download it and Ubuntu 9.10 (to compile) to give it a try and report back to us. I'll be doing the same!

Already set up Ubuntu Jaunty for a family member months ago, on a horrible Acer notebook. I used to use Linux exclusively for a year back in 2005 - Mandrake (at least it was called Mandrake Linux back then), PClinuxOS - one of the best KDE implementations, and finally, Ubuntu.

Moved waaaay past "desktop Linux" years ago. It's old news to me. Definitely far below Apple quality. Still.

I will try this Google OS, however, but I'm in no rush.
post #24 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregAlexander View Post

I agree, Apple needs to make sure it's in this game.

Google has so many fingers in so many pies, that if it pulls together it has a very compelling solution for most customers.

The missing piece is a Google iTunes app... Google has to be working on their own iTunes app that connects to multiple stores and multiple mp3 players. I guess if (when?) they release their own it is a declaration of war on Apple, so they may hold back a while longer.

Given Apple's track record, and their vision and remarkable knack for foretelling the future (even when no one else believes them), I'm willing to bet they've already got Google figured out on this one. Remember, this is Steve Jobs with the usual Apple team. Eric Schmidt can only "borrow" so many ideas from having sat on Apple's board before he runs out of them. Apple's got the entire industry figured out. I doubt this occasion is any different.
post #25 of 120
I think this was a good move by Google. Definitely an improvement over a complex OS that tries to be simplistic to run on cheap netbooks.
post #26 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregAlexander View Post

It surprises me Google is targeting netbooks only. I'd have thought they could get 50% of the market if it just installs on all the old clunker machines... anything that runs Windows 98 to XP (but can't quite do Windows 7)

Me, too. I think there are plenty of machine types and customers they are really focusing on. Netbooks may be a trojan horse and/or simply an identifiable way to market this simple OS.

Quote:
Damn, I have to remember I'm reading RoughlyDrafted (on AppleInsider).
So, Microsoft outlined plans to raise netbook prices eh?

Kind of, they said that Win7 Starter Edition would be around $50 for OEMs. As I recall, the netbooks couldnt run Vista so Linux was installed which pretty much forced MS to offer XP at a reduced rate to lose that marketshare, but the Linux netbooks were not a big hit and had plenty of returns, so it looks like MS knows that the OEMs have to pay for Win7 in order to successfully push their netbooks. (speculation)

Quote:
The missing piece is a Google iTunes app... Google has to be working on their own iTunes app that connects to multiple stores and multiple mp3 players. I guess if (when?) they release their own it is a declaration of war on Apple, so they may hold back a while longer.

So long as it connects to the iTS, syncs to iDevices and allows for their DRMed content then I think Apple will be okay with it but Apple needs to have control of this app at the OS level or license FairPlay to get DRMs videos or apps purchased and synced. That seems like a major roadblock.
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post #27 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The backend uses WebOjects the front end is Carbon on Macs, which I am sure they’ll change to Cocoa for 2010’s iPod Special Event in the fall with a new iTunes X name. It will also then be 64-bit. With iTunes 9 they switched the iTunes Store to render HTML, CSS and JS. That is one a major part of the puzzle if they want iTunes on Chrome OS. The other part is just making the rest of the interface work with the HW so you can sync your iDevice. Is there any way Apple is not working with Google to have this as a default setup? It helps Google push their OS, it helps Apple push their iTunes/iDevice environment, and it helps Google and Apple hit MS in the lower end of the OS market.

Yes. You're dreaming if you think Apple is going to drive Google's platform to success.
post #28 of 120
Alex Payne on Chrome OS

Smartest thing Ive seen so far about Chrome OS is this tweet by Alex Payne:

I have no opinion about Chrome OS. All I know is that cheap hardware feels cheap. Its less cloud computing than disposable computing.


Daring Fireball 09-11-19 6:10 PM John Gruber http://daringfireball.net/
post #29 of 120
I am sure this will be useful for some users, but working in network security and knowing how bad security really is in places, I definitely don't want to trust certain data to "the cloud".

And I would hardly call the past thin client NCs "cloud centric". The buzzword "cloud computing" was not around when thin clients were first rolled out. Most of them are used on internal corporate networks and are really just a front-end to Windows apps running on some central corporate server. Think Citrix...

But it is always nice to have new options and competition. But when you can't get access to "the cloud" then you are dead. The recent SideKick problems come to mind.

Like I said, it will be useful to some people. I can't wait to look over at the car in traffic that nearly crashed into me and seeing the driver trying to type on their netbook instead of trying to text message like they do now.
post #30 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

So long as it connects to the iTS, syncs to iDevices and allows for their DRMed content then I think Apple will be okay with it but Apple needs to have control of this app at the OS level or license FairPlay to get DRMs videos or apps purchased and synced. That seems like a major roadblock.

The bigger roadblock is that the OS is not designed to have local storage for the media files that iTunes depends on, therefore no iTunes on Chrome OS.
post #31 of 120
Chrome OS is shaping up to be more like Palm's WebOS than the iPhone OS.

It's primary advantage will be that it's architecture-agnostic. The same apps will run on x86, ARM or whatever else you want to throw at it.

Will it be a hit? Who knows. I could certainly see it taking off in the developing world where cost is the critical factor.
post #32 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post

Should Apple worry about Chrome OS? Not at all...

What good would worrying do? Will this effect Apple's business in the future. Absolutely. The question is, by how much? Probably not a huge, huge amount, but who knows what the future holds really. No one.

You be be 100% certain Apple are watching this space. They would be idiots not to be, and I don't think they are idiots.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #33 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by theveeb View Post

The bigger roadblock is that the OS is not designed to have local storage for the media files that iTunes depends on, therefore no iTunes on Chrome OS.

Yeah, I was just reading that it wont support HDDs. Not that it cant be made to support it or that SSDs wont be getting cheaper and larger with each passing year, but that does hamper the ability to have use your PC as the primary storage for your iTunes content and makes even renting an SD movie a potential issue at this point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Will it be a hit? Who knows. I could certainly see it taking off in the developing world where cost is the critical factor.

That is what I think Google is primarily targeting for long term growth despite their netbook statements.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #34 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DdubRes79 View Post

True but most people use 'sleep mode' on their laptops/desktops so it only takes a few seconds to be up and running anyway.

No, most people do not.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #35 of 120
Live Chrome OS Video stream.

Be sure to have Flip4Mac installed.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #36 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Doesn't look like a Premium experience, now does it?

Like the AppleTVs?
post #37 of 120
Chrome OS is a nice idea, but there's just some things that I can't do in a web browser that I need to do every day. Sure, it may be great for getting quick access to the internet and email, and it might even be fine for making documents and keeping track of my appointments, but for so much else you either can't do what you want in a browser or you can't do it the the extent or the way that you want. This will make it so Chrome OS is limited to personal use (like I can't do all my web design work within a browser), and even for personal use it won't be the only computer that you need (when was the last time someone managed to sync their ipod playlist with Google Chrome, and how will you be able to keep your family photos if you always have to take the time to upload them to Picasa?).
post #38 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

So long as it connects to the iTS, syncs to iDevices and allows for their DRMed content then I think Apple will be okay with it but Apple needs to have control of this app at the OS level or license FairPlay to get DRM’s videos or apps purchased and synced. That seems like a major roadblock.

Actually, I didn't mean a Google-Apple partnership on iTunes, though I imagine that's a possibility to some degree.

Google seem to be in a position where they could integrate their various pieces and dominate the next generation of computers. And if they take IBM's strategy of making their technology work with everyone else they may sneak in very effectively. They have YouTube. Maps. Advertising. Google Talk, File storage. Office apps. Email and calendaring (becoming more collaborative?). Web browser. Android. OS.

What they don't have is something like iTunes of THEIR OWN.

Google could easily make their own media player - integrating tightly with the users own content (online), open online content, music etc. Purchase music from Amazon online or Sony etc etc. Sync music, contacts/addresses, and other content with EVERY music player and phone.
post #39 of 120
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post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Already set up Ubuntu Jaunty for a family member months ago, on a horrible Acer notebook. I used to use Linux exclusively for a year back in 2005 - Mandrake (at least it was called Mandrake Linux back then), PClinuxOS - one of the best KDE implementations, and finally, Ubuntu.

Moved waaaay past "desktop Linux" years ago. It's old news to me. Definitely far below Apple quality. Still.

I will try this Google OS, however, but I'm in no rush.

Glad you tried out Linux variants! I meant using the linux os to build a Google OS, as stated in the document that tells you how to build ChromiumOS.
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
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Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
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