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Google outlines Chrome OS plans for netbooks - Page 2

post #41 of 120
Google hosted a technical introduction to its new Chrome OS today, which it expects to officially launch on new netbooks by the end of 2010.

Late 2010?? Might be a very different ballgame by then.
post #42 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Chrome OS is shaping up to be more like Palm's WebOS than the iPhone OS. ...

With the exception that Palms WebOS is about a thousand percent better thought out.

Am I the only one that thinks this is un-scaleable crap? any more than a few apps and it's just another cluttered browser. It doesn't look to me like you could even open the same amount of tabs that the average browser centric user is used to opening. All on a tiny screen? With only SSD storage?

The more I think about it, the more I think this is an OS for "po folks" in the third world. If you had any resources at all, you'd go for something a lot better than this.

Like maybe an iPhone or a tablet?
post #43 of 120
and the killer app is... working offline: editing some documents or writing some emails while listening some music.
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post #44 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by macosxp View Post

Chrome OS is a nice idea, but there's just some things that I can't do in a web browser that I need to do every day. Sure, it may be great for getting quick access to the internet and email, and it might even be fine for making documents and keeping track of my appointments, but for so much else you either can't do what you want in a browser or you can't do it the the extent or the way that you want. This will make it so Chrome OS is limited to personal use (like I can't do all my web design work within a browser), and even for personal use it won't be the only computer that you need (when was the last time someone managed to sync their ipod playlist with Google Chrome, and how will you be able to keep your family photos if you always have to take the time to upload them to Picasa?).

What cant it do that a normal user needs a computer for? You can store files locally.

Your iDevice is the only tricky part I see, but even that can be dealt with my having a browser-based app that manipulate the files directly on the device. You already do this with native Windows and Mac OS X apps and Im sure Google can figure out how to do it without breaking any "Apple laws. If not, some will make a browser app that will do it, perhaps even Apple.

Chrome OS is being designed for SSDs, no HDDs, but that may be only for the internal OS. It may be possible to use a USB 3.0 drive (jumping ahead since this is still a year away from launch) with a HDD to store your files. Or even an networked storage device to hold all your household files. You can already use an external drive for iTunes so that isnt a big deal.

Though it being marketed as a secondary computer so maybe not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Live Chrome OS Video stream.

Be sure to have Flip4Mac installed.

Thanks for the link.
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post #45 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

With the exception that Palms WebOS is about a thousand percent better thought out.

Am I the only one that thinks this is un-scaleable crap? any more than a few apps and it's just another cluttered browser. It doesn't look to me like you could even open the same amount of tabs that the average browser centric user is used to opening. All on a tiny screen? With only SSD storage?

The more I think about it, the more I think this is an OS for "po folks" in the third world. If you had any resources at all, you'd go for something a lot better than this.

Like maybe an iPhone or a tablet?

I agree that its actually designed for po folks, which really isnt the netbook market so much as emerging markets where Google wants to get in before MS has a chance to even give away WIndows that will work on minimum HW.

I dont agree that its not scalable for the average consumer doing minimal work. Id separate the netbook from Chrome OS in your mind. I will be putting Chrome OS on my MBP but I wont be buying a netbook to use it. Surely I can get more juice for web browsing out of Chrome OS than Mac OS X on the same machine. With flights pushing more and more for WiFi this is important to me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

and the killer app is... working offline: editing some documents or writing some emails while listening some music.

Whats wrong with working offline?
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post #46 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Will people really want to load this on a computer?
On anything other than a $100 netbook? (when one arrives.)
I mean I dislike Microsoft as much as the next guy, but really?

Yes, really. It isn't that people will want to load this onto a netbook. It's that people want a netbook for precisely that use: A NET book.

If Google can find a way to get companies to sell netbooks with their "just a browser" OS, I think it'll take off in a big way.
post #47 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

and the killer app is... working offline: editing some documents or writing some emails while listening some music.

THANK YOU. Finally someone mentioned it. I think definitely Google has to rethink local machine caching of data and resync when connected to the cloud.

I mean, unless I'm reading the article wrong, basically your laptop is a BRICK if you are not in 3G/ WiFi coverage. Like if you are in a taxi or airplane or wifi-locked-down corporate building, and you desperately need that word document... your FKed, basically.

Overall good idea, this Chrome OS, overall good to nibble off Microsoft's feet. However, without LOCAL CACHING, outside the US and Europe (which is what could really, really matter for netbooks and cheap laptops ~ ie. the developing world) ... I don't know how successful this Chrome OS is going to be in 2011 and 2012. By 2011 and 2012 the most basic netbooks will run Windows 7 *fast* without worry.
post #48 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2oh1 View Post

Yes, really. It isn't that people will want to load this onto a netbook. It's that people want a netbook for precisely that use: A NET book.

If Google can find a way to get companies to sell netbooks with their "just a browser" OS, I think it'll take off in a big way.

The problem is if Google targets this as a way-too-stripped down thing. What about MSN or Yahoo? Just through web-type apps? Could work, but users will want something robust and flexible enough, even if the OS is free. Some other apps they might like. It has to support full Flash otherwise casual gaming may not work.

If Google strips this "netbook" down too much then it serves no more purpose than what even a cheap smartphone could easily, easily do in 2011, 2012.

First step is great "web apps". Second step is local caching and local user data which syncs with the cloud and allows you to use the laptop offline. Third step would be some sort of either App Store or sandboxed binary-translation layer to run Windows apps.

I know the third step is exactly what Google doesn't want to do. Maybe I'm too ambitious but people want choice and enough flexibility. The iPhone 3G/S strikes just the right balance. Cripple ChromeOS too much, and it would be just alright, not as great as it could be.
post #49 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Thanks for the link.

Sure.
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post #50 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Whats wrong with working offline?

There is nothing wrong with working offline, but the point is: how you gonna do it as long as you're out of wire/wireless coverage and you cannot access the "cloud" where all the apps are running? You can eventually cache some music, maybe even some apps, but again, if everything is processed inside the cloud, then when offline, we're fcuked.
Even in EU/US we don't have 100% coverage (not to mention emerging countries), and if roaming in EU, that's gonna kill yr wallet, so you don't wanna do it.
The idea of this OS is good, but until 100% coverage is achieved and affordable, I don't want to pay my internet provider (operator) for accessing the cloud to just processing my documents and listening MY OWN music. So, local storage is needed. Most probably some local processing power and apps are needed as well.
Well, let's just wait and see how it will actually work.
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post #51 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

THANK YOU. [...]

you're welcome.
In the mean time, let's just use our (MB)laptops and (i)phones to do the work, and eventually try to optimize them for lower working temperatures and longer battery life, as this is the most stringent "feature" these days.
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post #52 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Google hosted a technical introduction to its new Chrome OS today, which it expects to officially launch on new netbooks by the end of 2010.

Late 2010?? Might be a very different ballgame by then.

Apple Tablet would be out by then. Apple tablet target: revolutionize the "dead" publishing industry just like it "saved" the music industry. Then, besides being a cool gadget, some other things that make it essential in some verticals like medical industry, education <--- this could be critical .... and so on.
post #53 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Collecting my SSD iMac Fry-die.

SSD iMac??? OMFG I hate you.
post #54 of 120
Good luck to them with that. I hope it's not the android fiasco type of initiative.

It's sad to see them imitating micro and soft in big proclamations and miserably short on delivery.

Way intelligent to target the netbooks market by the way. And perceptive. Too bad in a couple of years at most crappy netbooks will be a thing of the past, remembered as an abomination, and thin and light notebooks with proper screens and keyboards like the macbook air and tablets and ebook readers will be the way forward.

It's really sad to see these guys with so much bought talent and enormous funds behind them falling so short of actually coming up with something inspiring and innovative. They are perfect in thinking within the known box, but outside of it....well...

I remember seeing one of these stationary swimming pools in google hq, a big f. off organisation and too miniscule pools throwing water the opposite direction. The owner getting married in some private island in the Caribbean with Bill Clinton and all sorts of shady dignitaries surrounding him. A social climbers dream. And yet in terms of vision it all boils down to a couple of 3 m by 2m swimming pools.
post #55 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

you're welcome.
In the mean time, let's just use our (MB)laptops and (i)phones to do the work, and eventually try to optimize them for lower working temperatures and longer battery life, as this is the most stringent "feature" these days.

The latest MacBook Pro 13" has a pretty decent temp and battery life. But, of course, could be cooler, thinner, lighter. I think battery life is quite alright, but then again I don't travel or commute a huge amount *at the moment*.

iPhone -- yeah, battery life on the 3GS is definitely improved, but for heavy users and on 3G, surviving one whole day on a single charge can be a bit tricky.

Here's to miniaturized nuclear fission battery cells! Lasts 100 years without charging! However, "exploding iPod" lawsuits could take on a whole new dimension.
post #56 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Will people really want to load this on a computer?
On anything other than a $100 netbook? (when one arrives.)
I mean I dislike Microsoft as much as the next guy, but really?

I get the feeling thats the point though.. this is aimed at the market who just wanna check their email, browse the internet, and do some light work.. I would think that market is actually fairly large. Filled with people who have no major interest in computers and don't want to spend $600 to do those few functions. I think its a good idea.

Although one would think that as the world becomes more technical, this market would naturally get smaller and smaller?

Neat idea.. interesting to see what comes of this..
post #57 of 120
Google stormed into the scene and shook things up, and they do continue to revolutionize things. But as an organisation gets big, things can start to stagnate and they become too inward-thinking.

The main reason a (seriously, nowadays) huge enterprise like Apple continues to be in the forefront is because it looks at things from a customer-centric point of view. It too falls victim to its own foibles sometimes, but almost everyday saying, "what would a person do?" has underpinned their success.

Google now has their huge search engine and ads business to drive their operations. That leaves space for all sorts of hit-and-miss things alongside the (as you aptly put it) "big proclamations".

Faith in the cloud, for one thing, is ridiculously high at the moment. Given the amount of sales and revenue from, as a poster mentioned, Europe and developing economies being very important, the cloud ain't always hanging over you head, for chrriissakes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

Good luck to them with that. I hope it's not the android fiasco type of initiative.

It's sad to see them imitating micro and soft in big proclamations and miserably short on delivery.

Way intelligent to target the netbooks market by the way. And perceptive. Too bad in a couple of years at most crappy netbooks will be a thing of the past, remembered as an abomination, and thin and light notebooks with proper screens and keyboards like the macbook air and tablets and ebook readers will be the way forward.

It's really sad to see these guys with so much bought talent and enormous funds behind them falling so short of actually coming up with something inspiring and innovative. They are perfect in thinking within the known box, but outside of it....well...

I remember seeing one of these stationary swimming pools in google hq, a big f. off organisation and too miniscule pools throwing water the opposite direction. The owner getting married in some private island in the Caribbean with Bill Clinton and all sorts of shady dignitaries surrounding him. A social climbers dream. And yet in terms of vision it all boils down to a couple of 3 m by 2m swimming pools.
post #58 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

SSD iMac??? OMFG I hate you.

Well that's too bad 'cause I love you. And by tomorrow I'll be able to love you several times faster!
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post #59 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

Good luck to them with that. I hope it's not the android fiasco type of initiative.

It's sad to see them imitating micro and soft in big proclamations and miserably short on delivery.

Way intelligent to target the netbooks market by the way. And perceptive. Too bad in a couple of years at most crappy netbooks will be a thing of the past, remembered as an abomination, and thin and light notebooks with proper screens and keyboards like the macbook air and tablets and ebook readers will be the way forward.

It's really sad to see these guys with so much bought talent and enormous funds behind them falling so short of actually coming up with something inspiring and innovative. They are perfect in thinking within the known box, but outside of it....well...

I remember seeing one of these stationary swimming pools in google hq, a big f. off organisation and too miniscule pools throwing water the opposite direction. The owner getting married in some private island in the Caribbean with Bill Clinton and all sorts of shady dignitaries surrounding him. A social climbers dream. And yet in terms of vision it all boils down to a couple of 3 m by 2m swimming pools.

In 10 years time that comment may look very dumb.
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post #60 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by rorybalmer View Post

I get the feeling thats the point though.. this is aimed at the market who just wanna check their email, browse the internet, and do some light work.. I would think that market is actually fairly large. Filled with people who have no major interest in computers and don't want to spend $600 to do those few functions. I think its a good idea.

Although one would think that as the world becomes more technical, this market would naturally get smaller and smaller?

Yeah, number one, these people who "just wanna do simple stuff" are not that dumb. My 70 year old dad checks email, checks stock prices, watches TV shows, backs up to hard disks. I see young teens at the cafe with netbooks online chatting, Facebooking but also firing up the occassional Flash or local-install gaming/ MMO. My dad and these teens could all be potential Google ChromeOS users. Does ChromeOS offer enough flexibility?

Defining the current netbook market and people as simpletons is all fine and good, but as you correctly point out, we're talking 2011 and 2012. I'll say again, by 2012 all this simpleton netbook stuff could be done by cheap smartphones anyway.

Windows continues to be successful because not many know better, but also you can do virtually anything you want to do with it, whatever your needs. That's why crapware is incredibly abundant but people do get a lot of flexibility and a wide range of things they can do.

Google dictating your "cloud experience" may smack of the thin-client fantasy going back 10+ years and Sun's infamous "the network is the computer" stuff.
post #61 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

The latest MacBook Pro 13" has a pretty decent temp and battery life. But, of course, could be cooler, thinner, lighter. I think battery life is quite alright, but then again I don't travel or commute a huge amount *at the moment*.

iPhone -- yeah, battery life on the 3GS is definitely improved, but for heavy users and on 3G, surviving one whole day on a single charge can be a bit tricky.

Here's to miniaturized nuclear fission battery cells! Lasts 100 years without charging! However, "exploding iPod" lawsuits could take on a whole new dimension.

Yep, 100% agree with the whole statement, especially with the <"exploding iPod" lawsuits could take on a whole new dimension> part.

I for myself I'll be simple waiting 2~3 more years to see the MBA getting improved (I'm not gonna list my expectations), as that's the right product for the next 5~10 years.

For now, I'm happy enough with my iPhone3G+AluMB+APExpress as they are doing the job I need.

Cheers!
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post #62 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Well that's too bad 'cause I love you. And by tomorrow I'll be able to love you several times faster!

Where I am at the moment I only have my powerbook g4 12" with me, and the iphone, and as much as I think this is the best form factor/design lappie every released, it would sure do great with an ssd, too bad the runcore ide ssd's are only marginally better than an hd...

Btw how come you went with a stock ssd, considering things like runcores and intel ssds run circles around them?

In any case this is the future, ssd's in our desktops big raid hds in our nas servers.
post #63 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Well that's too bad 'cause I love you. And by tomorrow I'll be able to love you several times faster!

But you love me fast time, not long time.
post #64 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

Btw how come you went with a stock ssd, considering things like runcores and intel ssds run circles around them?

Runcore is a shady company with shady benchmarks. The Intel ones are great and all, but their costs far outweigh their benefits in my view. The Samsung is a great all rounder, which compared to a regular spinning HD may as well be branded a Ferrari HD.

Before I bought one I read this little article here.
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post #65 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

There is nothing wrong with working offline, but the point is: how you gonna do it as long as you're out of wire/wireless coverage and you cannot access the "cloud" where all the apps are running? You can eventually cache some music, maybe even some apps, but again, if everything is processed inside the cloud, then when offline, we're fcuked.
Even in EU/US we don't have 100% coverage (not to mention emerging countries), and if roaming in EU, that's gonna kill yr wallet, so you don't wanna do it.
The idea of this OS is good, but until 100% coverage is achieved and affordable, I don't want to pay my internet provider (operator) for accessing the cloud to just processing my documents and listening MY OWN music. So, local storage is needed. Most probably some local processing power and apps are needed as well.
Well, let's just wait and see how it will actually work.

I didnt see anything that made Chrome OS work more like a dumb terminal than a proper OS. Im looking at it like WebOS. It uses an interface that is completely built with HTML, CSS and JS on a linux kernel.

All those Google apps and anything else with HTML5 w/the local DB storage will work offline. Some (browser) apps that you usually access when you go to a site will be part of the basic install. Much more should be available by the time Chrome OS launches. If you check out the video in the link Ireland supplied you see that its looking pretty good so far. This wont replace a full fledged OS for people with money or needing more powerful apps but its not suppose to.

The WebKit Team has been working on Page Caching and OpenGL for HW acceleration within the browser are being worked on. These two things came up after Google announced Chrome OS and seem more suited to assist them than anyone else.

I see nothing that will disallow accessing a local networked drive or attached drive. I could be wrong, but the limitation of only using an SSD for the OS itself wouldnt be applicable to any other drive so you could have as much local storage as you want. Maybe by the time Chrome OS really gets going using SD cards like microSD cards are used in smartphones will be the way these users will store their data. \
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post #66 of 120
Chrome OS sounds like a great idea except for one BIG problem: what happens if the Internet connection goes down.

I'd like to be able to use the computer even if the Internet connection is down. It appears Chrome OS relies a LOT on online connectivity, and that kind of scares me.
post #67 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

...I for myself I'll be simple waiting 2~3 more years to see the MBA getting improved (I'm not gonna list my expectations), as that's the right product for the next 5~10 years...

The issue (I work part-time for an Apple reseller) with MBA can be people being way too rough and breaking the screen hinge. As you go thinner and thinner you do compromise (despite unibody construction, which is great) on strength and rigidity.

Which essentially means for "super thin and light" the only next direction they can go between 2010 to 2020 is that flexible, polymer stuff. Environmentally, boy, it ain't as sweet as Aluminium, but I'm sure they can figure out something. Humans are smart enough. Time for flexible, polymer tablet/ ultra-thin-light "laptops" *made* from recycled material *and* easily recylable. Oh, and the killer feature: integrated batteries within the same flexible, polymer construction.

Jonny Ive, let's take it to the next level.
post #68 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Runcore is a shady company with shady benchmarks. The Intel ones are great and all, but their costs far outweigh their benefits in my view. The Samsung is a great all rounder, which compared to a regular spinning HD may as well be branded a Ferrari HD.

Before I bought one I read this little article here.

Anandtech is the king of SSD web reporting and Intel is the king in SSDs right now but yeah the midrange has definite advantages. I would be willing to blow $300 on an SSD for my MacBook but reports of compatibility issues (eg. from Anandtech as well) concern me... and a decent 256GB SSD at $300 doesn't exist yet.

Can you provide a link to the SSD you got? And from where? It's not from Apple, right?
post #69 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Anandtech is the king of SSD web reporting and Intel is the king in SSDs right now but yeah the midrange has definite advantages. I would be willing to blow $300 on an SSD for my MacBook but reports of compatibility issues (eg. from Anandtech as well) concern me... and a decent 256GB SSD at $300 doesn't exist yet.

Can you provide a link to the SSD you got? And from where? It's not from Apple, right?

Im right there with you. I was waiting for it but then decided to get a 7200RPM 500GB HDD instead. That whole thing with the SATA 1.5Gbps firmware update not officially supporting 3.0Gbps is pretty lame.

PS: Did you read the previous article where he speculated that the reason Apple didnt use Intels first SSDs was because it would have lowered the green rating but that the current versions dont have that drawback due to a material change? Its been more than enough time and Apple and Intel still have a friendship, as far as I can tell, so Id like to know whats up. Im sure Id go with an Intel drive if Apple offered it.
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post #70 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by SactoMan01 View Post

Chrome OS sounds like a great idea except for one BIG problem: what happens if the Internet connection goes down.

I'd like to be able to use the computer even if the Internet connection is down. It appears Chrome OS relies a LOT on online connectivity, and that kind of scares me.

You keep working and any changes are saved locally. Next time you connect it syncs with your cloud storage. Easy peezy.
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post #71 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Can you provide a link to the SSD you got?

This may or may not be the link you're looking for
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post #72 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

... I dont agree that its not scalable for the average consumer doing minimal work. Id separate the netbook from Chrome OS in your mind. I will be putting Chrome OS on my MBP but I wont be buying a netbook to use it. Surely I can get more juice for web browsing out of Chrome OS than Mac OS X on the same machine. With flights pushing more and more for WiFi this is important to me. ...

Well, it's still early days in that no one has really used it yet and it's still basically an alpha, but ...

the more I think about it the stupider it seems to me. Your MacBook for instance would be ridiculously overpowered for such an OS, you wouldn't be using a fraction of the capabilities of the machine.

I also *do* think that it isn't scaleable in that the size of the screen and how many tabs you can put in your browser is very finite. I suppose it would allow for as many tabs open as anyone can have open in a full screen browser anyway, but then on the other hand a big chunk of them will be used up by apps, that in a "normal" OS situation, one would switch to outside of the browser.

Suppose I'm working on the web for instance, and writing at the same time. I have the full compliment of tabs open in the browser, and a similar number of documents open in the word processor. In Chrome OS, I would only be able to have half as many, because the word processing is being done in the browser as well.

It was that comment someone made about Palms WebOS that really got me thinking though. If each document is a browser window or tab, it seems to me that WebOS is a much better thought out implementation of that basic idea. Instead of tabs, there are "cards" and the management of those cards is much better implemented. It's also touch enabled and designed for a modern mobile, instead of being designed for yesterday's netbook, which is about to get eclipsed by the tablet.

The guy even said before he started his presentation that Chrome OS *is* Chrome the browser.

I think that's the best way to think about it. It's not really an OS in the sense that it's a design that helps you manage your data, or your documents, or your contacts, or anything really. It's a browser. Period. The apps are not only not really a part of the OS, they aren't even necessarily designed for the OS, or the device that it sits on.

I think Apple's integrated approach with the OS closely designed to the hardware, and the apps to the OS, is going to leave this thing in the dust by the side of the road.
post #73 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Well, it's still early days in that no one has really used it yet and it's still basically an alpha, but ...

the more I think about it the stupider it seems to me.

Ive been expecting this type of OS to come out for well over a decade and having it come from Google as a dedicated internet appliance for about a decade now. OS agnostic computing is the future for the majority of consumers. Most of the worlds population dont have any computer or any internet. This simple OS could change that. If not this, then something built off the foundations this builds.

Quote:
Your MacBook for instance would be ridiculously overpowered for such an OS, you wouldn't be using a fraction of the capabilities of the machine.

Absolutely, which is why Id want to use this very simple OS with very simple power requirements when Im trying to conserve battery power for as long as possible while still trying to use the internet or do some other basic function that a browser-based app can do.

Quote:
I also *do* think that it isn't scaleable in that the size of the screen and how many tabs you can put in your browser is very finite. I suppose it would allow for as many tabs open as anyone can have open in a full screen browser anyway, but then on the other hand a big chunk of them will be used up by apps, that in a "normal" OS situation, one would switch to outside of the browser.

Most users arent actively using an excessive number of apps on their computers now. Windows has trained people to close out apps before they open another.

That said, the apps you use, like Facebook, Gmail, Chess, whatever can be represented by a single identifiable icon. If that becomes a real problem there is nothing stopping this from having sectioned off tabs with multiple rows or scrolling tab rows. The possibilities are endless at this point. If you watch the demo you see they have more tabs open than people typical use.

Quote:
Suppose I'm working on the web for instance, and writing at the same time. I have the full compliment of tabs open in the browser, and a similar number of documents open in the word processor. In Chrome OS, I would only be able to have half as many, because the word processing is being done in the browser as well.

Im not following why youd have half the tabs open that you need. Just like in a regular browser the tabs alter sizes as needed. This isnt supposed to be a work horse OS so i you need something more robust then a a more powerful system with a more powerful OS is always available. This is an option for an consumer that has been overlooked for a very long time.

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It was that comment someone made about Palms WebOS that really got me thinking though. If each document is a browser window or tab, it seems to me that WebOS is a much better thought out implementation of that basic idea. Instead of tabs, there are "cards" and the management of those cards is much better implemented. It's also touch enabled and designed for a modern mobile, instead of being designed for yesterday's netbook, which is about to get eclipsed by the tablet.

With a phone sized display cards do make more sense. The iPhones Safari has pages but they essentially the same thing. There is nothing stopping this open software from making a card type browser so that it can swipe an entire browser of tabs to an entirely new browser of different tabs. Just like virtual desktops in KDE, Gnome and Mac OS X, having the same thing in Chrome OS is not too a big deal for those that need it. The browser window is the desktop.

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I think that's the best way to think about it. It's not really an OS in the sense that it's a design that helps you manage your data, or your documents, or your contacts, or anything really. It's a browser. Period. The apps are not only not really a part of the OS, they aren't even necessarily designed for the OS, or the device that it sits on.

Still in the development stage Ive seen some amazing things done with HTML5, CSS and JS. I cant think of anything people typically do with computers cannot be done in a web-based environment. WebOS is proof that OS rendered in web-code can be viable even if Palm is fudging things up. (Pre being sold for as low as $80 and Pixie already at $25)

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I think Apple's integrated approach with the OS closely designed to the hardware, and the apps to the OS, is going to leave this thing in the dust by the side of the road.

Yes and no, it depends on what type of computing were talking about. If I need to plug in a SD card to run Chrome OS while flying from Miami to Madrid so I can have internet for the entire trip and then some I will likely do that, especially if wanting to play videos that require Flash. I should be able to see and access my files on my local HDD, too, once the OS has booted from a solid-state drive.

I plan on compiling the OS this weekend to see what features are there but the demo looked pretty good.
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post #74 of 120
i get the fundamental "cloud" orientation of the Chrome OS. but ...

- isn't that how the Pre apps are supposed to work too? it hasn't exactly caught on ... neither did web apps on the iPhone 2G.
- aren't many iPhone apps in fact hybrid local/cloud apps? doesn't that better combine the advantages of both?
- what about all those little split-second lags the internet keeps throwing into your workflow? won't people find that too annoying when it happens to everything you do, all the time?
- safe to assume you can always create a local backup of everything stored in your cloud? (otherwise, forget it!).
post #75 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

i get the fundamental "cloud" orientation of the Chrome OS. but ...

- isn't that how the Pre apps are supposed to work too? it hasn't exactly caught on ... neither did web apps on the iPhone 2G.
- aren't many iPhone apps in fact hybrid local/cloud apps? doesn't that better combine the advantages of both?
- what about all those little split-second lags the internet keeps throwing into your workflow? won't people find that too annoying when it happens to everything you do, all the time?
- safe to assume you can always create a local backup of everything stored in your cloud? (otherwise, forget it!).

The Pres WebOS apps are locally installed. They use HTML, CSS and JS, but they are stored locally and run locally. They only need the internet if the app calls for it just like with any Windows or Mac OS X app.
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post #76 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

i get the fundamental "cloud" orientation of the Chrome OS. but ...
- what about all those little split-second lags the internet keeps throwing into your workflow? won't people find that too annoying when it happens to everything you do, all the time?

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The Pres WebOS apps are locally installed. They use HTML, CSS and JS, but they are stored locally and run locally. They only need the internet if the app calls for it just like with any Windows or Mac OS X app.

When using Google Spreadsheets online, it does Autosave every few changes to autosync with the cloud. I imagine this could be problematic if it happens over cellular data. Of course, they could/would tweak various things with Chrome OS.
post #77 of 120
Personally I have no desire at all to have all my data in the cloud, this for me kills the idea of Chrome OS. I would have preferred that Google got behind a Linux distro and one of the UI kits and really attacted the industry. Given the right configuration Linux can be very snappy on low end hardware, it is interesting that Samsung is targetting the low end with Enlightenment. At least the is the rumor, the point is the capability to run local apps and store local data make for some very interesting capabilities.

Frankly I have a good way to run web apps with Safari or Firefox. So why limit myself with yet another device. At the rate we are going you would need anE-Book reader machine and a web browsing machine and even another to run local productivity apps. A good laptop is just a cheaper solution.


Dave
post #78 of 120
Browser and Security - quite the oxymoron isn't it?

Sorry, I like Chrome as a browser. I like a lot of the google stuff. I'm not drinking their Kool-Aid on this one.
post #79 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I’m right there with you. I was waiting for it but then decided to get a 7200RPM 500GB HDD instead. That whole thing with the SATA 1.5Gbps firmware update not officially supporting 3.0Gbps is pretty lame.

PS: Did you read the previous article where he speculated that the reason Apple didn’t use Intel’s first SSDs was because it would have lowered the “green rating” but that the current versions don’t have that drawback due to a material change? It’s been more than enough time and Apple and Intel still have a friendship, as far as I can tell, so I’d like to know what’s up. I’m sure I’d go with an Intel drive if Apple offered it.

According to Anandtech it just wasn't whether it was 1.5 or 3.0Gbps, some SSDs simply do not work with a MacBook/Pro if it ain't from Apple -- I probably need to research more anyways on what SSDs Apple is actually using...!

I didn't read the article about the "green rating" but I think it is possible Intel SSDs would be what Apple would use if they had the "green" light. Though cost-wise, Intel SSDs are generally the most expensive.

As for the Intel-Apple partnership, now that more or less everything in 2nd half of 2010 onwards will be Intel-chipset and Intel-CPU based (Core i3, i5, i7, Nehalem Xeon)... yeah, I guess I kinda hope that means Intel SSDs. But it is also *important* for third-party SSDs to be compatible with Macs ~ why don't things "just work" like platter drives? Now that TRIM and so on is the newest thing in SSD-land, that also throws a few complications into the mix.
post #80 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

When using Google Spreadsheets online, it does Autosave every few changes to autosync with the cloud. I imagine this could be problematic if it happens over cellular data. Of course, they could/would tweak various things with Chrome OS.

Isnt that how the Google docs work in general, without HTML5 utilizing any local DBD storage. Of all the potential issues that a browser-based OS I cant see local storage capabilities as being one of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

According to Anandtech it just wasn't whether it was 1.5 or 3.0Gbps, some SSDs simply do not work with a MacBook/Pro if it ain't from Apple -- I probably need to research more anyways on what SSDs Apple is actually using!

Oh yeah, it was even worse after the firmware update. I have to agree that of any single component a storage device should just work, regardless.

Quote:
I didn't read the article about the "green rating" but I think it is possible Intel SSDs would be what Apple would use if they had the "green" light. Though cost-wise, Intel SSDs are generally the most expensive.

The first Intel SSDs used halogen in the controller which would mean they couldnt be BFR-free.
Scroll down to Halogen Free, Apple Friendly PS: Those prices for the Intel SSDs are better than the price for GB than other vendors but I cant find those prices in the real world.
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