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Malicious worm attacks, steals data from jailbroken iPhones

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
iPhones with modified software could be vulnerable to a new, malicious worm that can allow remote access and control without the owner's knowledge or permission.

It is estimated that hundreds of users are currently affected by a worm that targets users of "jailbroken" iPhones who live in the Netherlands and use the bank ING Direct. But security company F-Secure told the BBC that the currently isolated issue could easily jump to thousands of handsets. The worm is reportedly spread between phones when they share the same Wi-Fi spot.

In order for an iPhone to be vulnerable to the new worm, they must have willingly modified their handset's software to allow them to run unauthorized code. Phones can be jailbroken to run applications or modify the system in ways not approved by Apple.

The worm only affects jailbroken phones that have SSH (secure shell) installed, without the default password -- "alpine" -- changed. It employs the same method as a previous worm, Ikee, that was not malicious. Instead, the wallpaper-changing prank simply changed the user's background to a picture of 1980s pop star Rick Astley, who sang the 1987 hit "Never Gonna Give You Up."

But the new worm reportedly has botnet functionality and connects to a Web-based command and control center based in Lithuania.

For now, the worm is only aimed at customers who live in the Netherlands and bank with ING Direct. The online bank intends to put a warning on its Web site.

This summer, a text messaging exploit was discovered by security researcher Charlie Miller that could allow someone to take control of the iPhone. Apple quickly fixed the issue. The exploit exposed the iPhone completely, giving hackers access to the camera, dialer, messaging and Safari.
post #2 of 63
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3743

Unauthorized modification of iPhone OS has been a major source of instability, disruption of services, and other issues

Last Modified: July 30, 2009
Article: HT3743

As designed by Apple, the iPhone OS ensures that the iPhone and iPod touch operate reliably. Some customers have not understood the risks of installing software that makes unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS ("jailbreaking") on their iPhone or iPod touch. Customers who have installed software that makes these modifications have encountered numerous problems in the operation of their hacked iPhone or iPod touch. Examples of issues caused by these unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS have included the following:


Device and application instability: Frequent and unexpected crashes of the device, crashes and freezes of built-in apps and third-party apps, and loss of data.

Unreliable voice and data: Dropped calls, slow or unreliable data connections, and delayed or inaccurate location data.

Disruption of services: Services such as Visual Voicemail, YouTube, Weather, and Stocks have been disrupted or no longer work on the device. Additionally, third-party apps that use the Apple Push Notification Service have had difficulty receiving notifications or received notifications that were intended for a different hacked device. Other push-based services such as MobileMe and Exchange have experienced problems synchronizing data with their respective servers.

Compromised security: Security compromises have been introduced by these modifications that could allow hackers to steal personal information, damage the device, attack the wireless network, or introduce malware or viruses.

Shortened battery life: The hacked software has caused an accelerated battery drain that shortens the operation of an iPhone or iPod touch on a single battery charge.

Inability to apply future software updates: Some unauthorized modifications have caused damage to the iPhone OS that is not repairable. This can result in the hacked iPhone or iPod touch becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone OS update is installed.

Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks the iPhone OS. It is also important to note that unauthorized modification of the iPhone OS is a violation of the iPhone end-user license agreement and because of this, Apple may deny service for an iPhone or iPod touch that has installed any unauthorized software.
post #3 of 63

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post #4 of 63
This illustrates a very good reason why Apple keeps a tight lock on the iPhone. If this happened to a "locked" iPhone could you imagine the crap that Apple would take!

If you jailbreak your phone you are on your own!

I'm sure Apple will still take some shit for this because some do not understand the vulnerable and think all iPhones are susceptible, or just think that Apple is responsible for anything and everything regardless if the phone is jail-broken.

KRR
post #5 of 63
Serves them right for not changing their root password. That's just opening a can of worms right there.
post #6 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3743

Unauthorized modification of iPhone OS has been a major source of instability, disruption of services, and other issues

Last Modified: July 30, 2009
Article: HT3743

As designed by Apple, the iPhone OS ensures that the iPhone and iPod touch operate reliably. Some customers have not understood the risks of installing software that makes unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS ("jailbreaking") on their iPhone or iPod touch. Customers who have installed software that makes these modifications have encountered numerous problems in the operation of their hacked iPhone or iPod touch. Examples of issues caused by these unauthorized modifications to the iPhone OS have included the following:


Device and application instability: Frequent and unexpected crashes of the device, crashes and freezes of built-in apps and third-party apps, and loss of data.

Unreliable voice and data: Dropped calls, slow or unreliable data connections, and delayed or inaccurate location data.

Disruption of services: Services such as Visual Voicemail, YouTube, Weather, and Stocks have been disrupted or no longer work on the device. Additionally, third-party apps that use the Apple Push Notification Service have had difficulty receiving notifications or received notifications that were intended for a different hacked device. Other push-based services such as MobileMe and Exchange have experienced problems synchronizing data with their respective servers.

Compromised security: Security compromises have been introduced by these modifications that could allow hackers to steal personal information, damage the device, attack the wireless network, or introduce malware or viruses.

Shortened battery life: The hacked software has caused an accelerated battery drain that shortens the operation of an iPhone or iPod touch on a single battery charge.

Inability to apply future software updates: Some unauthorized modifications have caused damage to the iPhone OS that is not repairable. This can result in the hacked iPhone or iPod touch becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone OS update is installed.

Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks the iPhone OS. It is also important to note that unauthorized modification of the iPhone OS is a violation of the iPhone end-user license agreement and because of this, Apple may deny service for an iPhone or iPod touch that has installed any unauthorized software.

Have you heard, Jailbreaking your Phone also increases your risk of cancer too.

Those things you listed are grossly exaggerated, and most of those are no brainers. Of course you're going to have reduced battery life, your doing more things, Of course it's harder to update to future firmwares, you lose your jailbroken data. While sometimes I do instal things that messes with my services, I knowingly put them on and I can remove them to, and worst case scenario, I just restore to default firmware. My stability hasn't changed a bit, actually, I have 0 problems what so ever, unlike many of those to upgraded to 3.1.

Edit: I mean no disrespect to you Quadra, but rather what you quoted from the Apple Support page.
post #7 of 63
This is great, let all of the cheapskates who jailbreak their phones so that they can steal software burn!
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #8 of 63
Personally the folks who jail broke their phones now have to decide if it is worth the pain. You get a little more functionality and a huge increase in security risk. If security doesn't matter then the jailbreak releases you from the grasp of Apple control, but it is obvious that the security environment on a jail-broken iphone in dangerous. My guess is the jail-breaking will become much more a niche market since Apple has continued to improve the Iphone and has a feature set which cover the majority of users requirements
post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post

Have you heard, Jailbreaking your Phone also increases your risk of cancer too.

Those things you listed are grossly exaggerated, and most of those are no brainers. Of course you're going to have reduced battery life, your doing more things, Of course it's harder to update to future firmwares, you lose your jailbroken data. While sometimes I do instal things that messes with my services, I knowingly put them on and I can remove them to, and worst case scenario, I just restore to default firmware. My stability hasn't changed a bit, actually, I have 0 problems what so ever, unlike many of those to upgraded to 3.1.

Edit: I mean no disrespect to you Quadra, but rather what you quoted from the Apple Support page.

No offense taken.

You learn to develop a thick sin on these forums. But your comment wasn't in any way confrontational.

Apple has to cover all the bases when it comes to this. Yes, some of those are exaggerations, and are in the realm of "possible but unlikely." However, when I see the headline: "Malicious worm attacks, steals data from jailbroken iPhones", it does seem rather disturbing. When it comes to your data and (potentially) compromised security re banks, Apple's support page about jailbreaking does resonate a little more with me.
post #10 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by pats View Post

Personally the folks who jail broke their phones now have to decide if it is worth the pain. You get a little more functionality and a huge increase in security risk. If security doesn't matter then the jailbreak releases you from the grasp of Apple control, but it is obvious that the security environment on a jail-broken iphone in dangerous. My guess is the jail-breaking will become much more a niche market since Apple has continued to improve the Iphone and has a feature set which cover the majority of users requirements

It is pain to see such post about jailbreaking. Yes it is security risk if you install SSH and don't change the root password, similar to one of jumping out of airplane without parachute. Does this mean airplanes should be banned as too much of security risk ? You and Apple would say so.
post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

You learn to develop a thick sin on these forums.

I myself prefer a thick skin, but each to his own.....
post #12 of 63
hehe...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #13 of 63
Repeat again what has been said in another forum. It is interesting to see that Mac OS X comes "jailbroken" from the manufacturer, and no one claims it is a security risks and the next version of it should only allow installation of Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Office only through the iTunes after they go through indefinite process of software review. Wait, Office won't get through, as it duplicate functionality in iWorks as well as Firefox which duplicates features in Safari. Why it sounds so dumb if you take Mac OS X in account while it is pretty much the same system as iPhone OS ?

There is nothing wrong with Jail break.
post #14 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jglavin View Post

Serves them right for not changing their root password. That's just opening a can of worms right there.

It's not the fault of idiots however, when they are handed poor tools that they don't understand how to use by other idiots.

The fault here, and a large part of the blame, should be on those who promote jail-breaking IMO. There is a certain amount of darwinism in being the idiot that doesn't change their password, but the average idiot shouldn't be using SSH anyway, let alone using a version of it that leaves the password open and relies on them reading some complicated instructions to alleviate the danger.

By making jailbreaking a "click-here" idiot-proof thing, and then further promoting it on websites to the same idiots, the jailbreakers themselves created this problem.

I have quite a few friends now with jailbroken iPhones. They did it because it was "cool" and they wanted to change the wallpaper or something. They are not in fact idiots despite my language above, but they know nothing about the possible dangers and probably shouldn't be doing it.

They don't even really understand what they are doing when they "jailbreak." I would argue that most don't. If they had to do it themselves, they wouldn't know how at all. These people are writers or artists, or business people, not computer experts.

Sure, you can look at it and say "logically, they should have changed their password," and even point at the text file that told they should have, but that's not the whole of the blame.

The people that enable the one-click jailbreaking, the web-sites that talk about how to do it, the promoters of it on forums like this, and those that write the articles on sites like this ARE also to blame. It's like giving loaded handguns to children to play with but telling them not to point it at their friends and thinking you've done your job.
post #15 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

Repeat again what has been said in another forum. It is interesting to see that Mac OS X comes "jailbroken" from the manufacturer, and no one claims it is a security risks and the next version of it should only allow installation of Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Office only through the iTunes after they go through indefinite process of software review. Wait, Office won't get through, as it duplicate functionality in iWorks as well as Firefox which duplicates features in Safari. Why it sounds so dumb if you take Mac OS X in account while it is pretty much the same system as iPhone OS ?

There is nothing wrong with Jail break.

Then again OS X doesn't come with a default password that you need to know to change!

That's the danger of creating automated jailbreaks that allow people who don't know that they are doing to expose themselves to these risks.

"I'll tell you the problem with the scientific power that you're using here. It didn't require any discipline to attain it. You read what others had done and you took the next step. You didn't earn the knowledge for yourselves, so you don't take any responsibility for it." - Dr Ian Malcolm

(Sorry, could help myself including the quote. )
post #16 of 63
hehe...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #17 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

This is great, let all of the cheapskates who jailbreak their phones so that they can steal software burn!

Is that really the only reason to jailbreak?
post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by pats View Post

Personally the folks who jail broke their phones now have to decide if it is worth the pain. You get a little more functionality and a huge increase in security risk. If security doesn't matter then the jailbreak releases you from the grasp of Apple control, but it is obvious that the security environment on a jail-broken iphone in dangerous. My guess is the jail-breaking will become much more a niche market since Apple has continued to improve the Iphone and has a feature set which cover the majority of users requirements

Not really

I would in fact suggest that you get less functionality overall. Those that don't jail-brake their phones and update their OSs get more functionality than those that jail brake just to get a couple of apps to brag about.

And from what I have witnessed in my classes, those that do jail break are missing a lot. Invariably, it is shown that the original need has been negated and the increased functionalities and improvements seen with each update isn't worth the trouble and aggrivation.

However, this is not to say that everybody should stop. Actually, jailbroken apps are of most interest by legitimate developers. The reasons should be obvious.
post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

The people that enable the one-click jailbreaking, the web-sites that talk about how to do it, the promoters of it on forums like this, and those that write the articles on sites like this ARE also to blame. It's like giving loaded handguns to children to play with but telling them not to point it at their friends and thinking you've done your job.

It's a peculiar thing though that so many choose to jailbreak for one reason or another. Why doesn't Apple let you do many of the things jailbroken phones can do? Like change your wallpaper for instance...

Also, if piracy has become an issue because of jailbreaking, then maybe those who stand to profit most from suppressing piracy are the same people responsible for the worm lol.
post #20 of 63
hehe...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by krreagan View Post

This illustrates a very good reason why Apple keeps a tight lock on the iPhone. If this happened to a "locked" iPhone could you imagine the crap that Apple would take!

If you jailbreak your phone you are on your own!

Are you "on your own" if you install third-party software (like, for example, PhotoShop) on a Mac? Why is the iPhone different? Why is it locked down, when the Mac has no such limitation?

I think that third-party software should be freely available for the iPhone. I also think that non-technical folks should have an approval process for such software, and a friendly place to buy it, so that they will be excused from exercising difficult thought processes.

But for the folks out there who comfortable using technology, there should be places to obtain and install any software that they choose. Every consumer OS since the early days has allowed installation of software chosen by the owner of the device. Until now.
post #22 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

This is great, let all of the cheapskates who jailbreak their phones so that they can steal software burn!

Clearly you don't understand the real reason many people choose to jailbreak.

I love OSX, not just because it's a stable operating system with a great interface, but because of what most people don't care about - I live and breathe in Unix and love having a great OS environment that also gives me the full power of the Unix shell. The iPhone runs OSX but Apple prevents us from gaining access to its shell. A jailbroken iPhone gives that access.

I have no interest in stealing software, but do see the appeal of scripting cool stuff on my phone.
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

It is pain to see such post about jailbreaking. Yes it is security risk if you install SSH and don't change the root password, similar to one of jumping out of airplane without parachute. Does this mean airplanes should be banned as too much of security risk ? You and Apple would say so.


Why is it a pain. The only avenue of attack in not SSH. That is the current avenue being exploited actively. The fact you bypass application signing and allow other processes which bypass the sandboxing of applications opens many more opportunities then a SSH based attack. I could care less if you or anyone else jail breaks their Iphone, but bypassing the security environment increases your security risk. Security is a constant cat and mouse game and no one on the jailbreak side is worrying about your phone's security, your on your own which is fine for some folks. Many folks had their phones jailbroken to enable a baseband unlock to use their phone on a different network. Lots of these don't even know what SSH is or how to change a root password but they installed SSH as part of the process. Apple has every right to protect their image. If you follow the blogs reporting this info. It is always the Iphone is a security hazard and then in the small print is this note that it only affects the folks who bypass the security architecture via jailbreak.
post #24 of 63
It's up to jailbreakers to know what they're getting into and it's up to Apple to make sure there are fewer reasons to want to jail break. I wouldn't call them "idiots" but non-techies should have no real reasons for wanting to do this.

While having a locked down phone sucks, phones have sensitive information, which I'd rather not share with anyone. Especially with an iPhone, the hacker would have access to your iTunes account, credit card information - not to mention details on your friends and family.
post #25 of 63

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #26 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post

Clearly you don't understand the real reason many people choose to jailbreak.

I love OSX, not just because it's a stable operating system with a great interface, but because of what most people don't care about - I live and breathe in Unix and love having a great OS environment that also gives me the full power of the Unix shell. The iPhone runs OSX but Apple prevents us from gaining access to its shell. A jailbroken iPhone gives that access.

I have no interest in stealing software, but do see the appeal of scripting cool stuff on my phone.

What kinda stuff can you script on your phone? I'd consider jailbreaking as an 'experiment' of sorts once I upgrade.
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

There is a certain amount of darwinism in being the idiot that doesn't change their password, but the average idiot shouldn't be using SSH anyway, let alone using a version of it that leaves the password open and relies on them reading some complicated instructions to alleviate the danger.


The average computer user is not an idiot. It is possible that the average Mac user does not fit this profile, but personally, I doubt it.

If an idiot does stuff with the innards of his computer which he does not understand, he is likely to have all sorts of problems. But this is not a good reason to lock down devices intended for average folks. It is telling that the iPhone is locked down. It appears that it is a device intended for idiots, rather than average computer users. Appearances can be deceiving, however.

Here's a clue: If you don't know what the heck you are doing, don't take chances screwing around with basic low level stuff on your computer. Buy a Mac, and leave all the (few) settings at the default value. Only install software from Fortune 500 companies, and even then, prepare for confusion.

Here's another clue: If you don't now anything about cars, don't go under the hood and try to replace stock parts with high-performance parts. If you don't know anything about photography, buy a point-and-shoot camera and leave it on the "automatic" setting. If you don't know anything about boats, stay close to shore. You get the point...
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

hehe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

hehe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

hehe...

Have you, like, lost it, buddy? Hello? Anybody home?
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Have you, like, lost it, buddy? Hello? Anybody home?

wuh? wussup?

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #30 of 63
Oops....{deleted}
post #31 of 63
Jail breaking or Tampering with any product to modify it into what you the consumer wants of it is on the surface perfectly reasonable. That is one must be aware of the possible ramifications of your actions regardless of the source of the consequences. Ignorance is not a suitable defense. Most manufactures state very clearly this or that action is a 'No No" even if you may not understand why. You as the consumer have one avenue which allows you to have your will prevail. Bye a product from another vendor that does allow you to have what you want. But to stand there and complain because you cannot have your way or to gripe/grumble when things go wrong because of what you chose to do. IN short "GROW UP "

I would like to suggest to Apple they offer to UN-Jail break a unit for a healthy sum.

HT
post #32 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

It's not the fault of idiots however, when they are handed poor tools that they don't understand how to use by other idiots.

The fault here, and a large part of the blame, should be on those who promote jail-breaking IMO.

It's true that the "word on the street" on blogs/forums etc has been that jailbreaking is an easy harmless process. There are warnings here and there, like on the dev-team website that urge those jailbreakers to learn a bit about what they are doing before they do it, but they are not prominent enough.

I guess the bottom line is that even if everyone says its easy and harmless, you should probably do your own research before getting yourself into trouble.

Edit:
Quote:
Originally Posted by htoelle View Post

I would like to suggest to Apple they offer to UN-Jail break a unit for a healthy sum.

I like it- add insult to injury by charging the customer for something they could do themselves in about 5 minutes on their home computer.
post #33 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Why doesn't Apple let you do many of the things jailbroken phones can do? Like change your wallpaper for instance...

Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Are you "on your own" if you install third-party software (like, for example, PhotoShop) on a Mac? Why is the iPhone different? Why is it locked down, when the Mac has no such limitation?

Folks need to realize something very important. Apple doesn't look at the iPhone as a computer. It's not a Mac. Apple views it as an appliance. Like your DVD player, or a even like a PSP. It's not meant to be a general computing platform in the sense of your Mac or Windows PC. People can make DVDs to play in your DVD player, but they have to have the proper licenses and follow a certain format (even the DVDs you burn at home have these licenses via the software you are using). If you want to make a game for a PSP, you have to follow Sony's rules. Even though you can buy DVDs and PSP games at many different stores, they all have to follow the rules set by the licensing owners for the platform.

The difference is that Apple is also limiting distibution through just one outlet, iTunes, and is exercising control over the content, not just the format. Not saying that's right or wrong, but I think that's Apple's perspective. Most people don't try to change the screen saver on their DVD player, or the graphics on the UI of their TiVo. They just accept it as "that's how they designed my appliance."
post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

However, when I see the headline: "Malicious worm attacks, steals data from jailbroken iPhones", it does seem rather disturbing.

That is exactly the problem, this is sensationalism at its best, causing a disturbance where none is needed.

See the headline, does it contain truth to it? Sorta. Kinda. Not really. It only applies to a subset of jailbroken phones whose users were negligent.

Imagine you just bought a new Mac, and when you boot it up it instantly logs in and shows you the Desktop. Has that ever happened to you? No, because all new Macs run you through a setup where you get to set the "root password".

I'm not sure how the jailbreaking software is written these days, but if they're not doing it already they should simply run a basic utility that asks the users to set a root password when they install the jailbreak. With that, the problem is solved for even the dumbest of users.

Another metaphor: imagine you've bought a new house and you were never given a key to it, the doors are simply unlocked 100% of the time, and every thief on the block knows it. Same situation. Would you be surprised if someone broke in?

These worms are nothing special nor surprising, once you've changed the default password, the security of a jailbroken phone is just as good as a non-jailbroken one, with the exception that if a vulnerability is found for *everyone*, then when apple releases a fix you'll have to wait longer than most to get it.
post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainless View Post

It is pain to see such post about jailbreaking. Yes it is security risk if you install SSH and don't change the root password, similar to one of jumping out of airplane without parachute. Does this mean airplanes should be banned as too much of security risk ? You and Apple would say so.

That's a rediculous analogy and would only be appropriate if someone were banning iPhones. The aeroplane equivalent would be that people should not be opening the doors at 30,000 feet and admiring the view.

Jailbreaking is fun, I've hacked my ATV to run Boxee (but it's awful so I got rid of it) but I digress. The problem really is with amateur night 'hackers' following instructions they got from google and who don't really know what they're doing. Sure, hack your phone, but STFU when it bricks... it's quite an expensive mistake to make.

Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
15" Matte MacBook Pro: 2.66Ghz i7, 8GB RAM, GT330m 512MB, 512GB SSD

iPhone 5 Black 32GB

iPad 3rd Generation, 32GB

Mac Mini Core2Duo 2.26ghz,...

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post #36 of 63
hehe... halloa! learned to make yellow snow? congrats!

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #37 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

The difference is that Apple is also limiting distibution through just one outlet, iTunes, and is exercising control over the content, not just the format. Not saying that's right or wrong, but I think that's Apple's perspective. Most people don't try to change the screen saver on their DVD player, or the graphics on the UI of their TiVo. They just accept it as "that's how they designed my appliance."

Actually I spray painted camo on my DVD player and my comcast DVR UI has the Timesquare color theme! jk

but seriously, I could see Apple someday releasing an update that lets you theme the UI with different icons, colors, wallpapers, and even animation between screens. It's probably at the bottom of their todo list since it's not vital functionality, but it's definitely something everyone would enjoy a lot.
post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The worm only affects jailbroken phones that have SSH (secure shell) installed, without the default password -- "alpine" -- changed.

They totally deserve it. You can't just blame the people who help create and promote ways to jailbreak a phone. If you, as the end user, don't know enough to know what you're doing, stick with what you got.\
post #39 of 63
This is ridiculous.

People who jailbreak software does not automatically install SSH on the phone. You have to install openSSH from Cydia, and anyone who does download something like openSSH needs to understand how it works before they do it.

No, not every person out there downloads SSH. Yes, jailbroken iphones have MUCH more functionality than iphones - remember when you didn't have copy/paste, picture messaging, or phone search? I did. Oh, and I can access my filesystem anytime i want.
post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by eehd View Post

They totally deserve it. You can't just blame the people who help create and promote ways to jailbreak a phone. If you, as the end user, don't know enough to know what you're doing, stick with what you got.\

Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

This is great, let all of the cheapskates who jailbreak their phones so that they can steal software burn!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jglavin View Post

Serves them right for not changing their root password. That's just opening a can of worms right there.

Regardless if you are pro or against jailbreaking, wishing harm like this or justifying the harm done to them isn't exactly a kind way to go.

Its like saying "That guy that drove past me is using diesel in his unleaded engine. I hope he gets into a crash." True, his car will end up being damaged from the wrong fuel, but to wish someone harm doesn't make you look good.

Now, for those jail breakers who STEAL (which isn't all of them) programs, I am fine with people hoping they get caught and justice brought. Like the guy on the freeway who speeds past you, you hope there's an officer around so they can get a ticket. But still, I wouldn't want harm done to them. In this case, I would hope that those who have not changed the root password don't have any crazy expenses on their next bank statements!
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
Reply
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
Reply
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AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Malicious worm attacks, steals data from jailbroken iPhones