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iPhone security and privacy risk

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Read this PDF, the jailbroken stuff we know about in the begining of the PDF, just keep reading the rest for standard iPhones.

Marketeers, spies, hackers and big brother are all rejoicing over the iPhone's lack of security and privacy protection. Here people are carrying a spy device that they pay for every month, I good reason why the iPhone is not good for business.

http://seriot.ch/resources/talks_pap...onePrivacy.pdf


When the iPhone was released, CISCO sue Apple over the name. They made a agreement that CISCO technology could work with the iPhone, what that was was undisclosed.

CISCO routers are used in the backbone of the internet, hackers (black and white hats) found backdoors in these routers for big brother to access at will.

Apple iPhones uses AT&T, which is famous for allowing the NSA to create tap rooms next to their servers.

You see what's going on. You don't have to be paranoid, but THEY are paying attention to everything you do with your iPhone even more than they are doing with your computer internet browsing. You might have nothing to fear from big brother, but who else is watching you?

As we are getting more and more features and convenience, we are giving up our privacy in the process. Bad people will soon be able to figure out not only where we are and have been, but where we are going to be, all from a small device in your pocket.

Imagine big brother is watching, but then a criminal hacks your iPhone to put you at a scene of a crime. It could cost you your entire reputation and life savings defending yourself.
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #2 of 6
There has to be a balance between restricting the functionality of apps and preventing malicious use while not frustrating the user with popups. Imagine every app you open asking:

do you want this app to use the camera? y/n
what about outgoing wifi? y/n
what about your address book? y/n
what about your GPS location? y/n
what about phone usage stats? y/n

The location popup every time I open the camera bugs me but if I turn it off, I don't get to use my location in Maps.

Now, the first time an app runs, ok it would be nice of them to ask and I guess they could have a list of service checkboxes that the app requests use of and you can disable the ones you don't want it to access.

The suggestions in the PDF seem reasonable but Apple will do what they want no matter what people say. If they see a threat, they will fix it. The fact that so many apps are on the app store and so few problems shows that their quarantining has worked so far.

If someone makes an app for the purposes of trawling for contacts, chances are it's a low quality app so people won't download it. If it's a good app, chances are the developer won't want to risk losing money by having it pulled from the App Store.
post #3 of 6
Tinfoil hat time?

At least it doesn't have Flash cookies.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Now, the first time an app runs, ok it would be nice of them to ask and I guess they could have a list of service checkboxes that the app requests use of and you can disable the ones you don't want it to access.

Perhaps Apple should integrate the App Access Feature into the iPhone OS, so when you first run the new app the checkbox appears. Even better if the iPhone OS checks the code of the app and tells you what data it intends to access. The App Access Feature then can be accessed again in preferences to make any changes if need be depending upon the user.

I'm sure this would make a EXCELLENT app for the App Store, but alas, the iPhone can only run one app at a time right? Or does the new OS run more? I forget.

I also bet zillions of free and paid apps are just data collectors.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

The suggestions in the PDF seem reasonable but Apple will do what they want no matter what people say. If they see a threat, they will fix it. The fact that so many apps are on the app store and so few problems shows that their quarantining has worked so far.

Or perhaps they are just not minding the store. Take OS X, still no outgoing firewall, browsers can make all sorts of extra connections without the user even knowing it.

The older AddressBook used to contact Apple even if one didn't have a DotMac account which was highly suspicious. Now Apple has paid more attention to privacy concerns and allows users to enable contact and auto-syncing in AddressBook preferences.

So they will listen if enough people will complain about the poor privacy of the iPhone.
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Tinfoil hat time?

At least it doesn't have Flash cookies.


And the security issues associated with Flash too, but still this is a problem Apple needs to address.


The hackers have this and are running with it.


Here's my paranoid approach to computing and dealing with Flash cookies.

http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...94#post1421294
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Military software uses iPhone to track.

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/...nemies-in-war/
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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