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iPod touch users slow to upgrade mobile OS - Study

post #1 of 91
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While nearly 95 percent of iPhone users have upgraded to iPhone 3.0 or greater, only 55 percent of iPod touch users have done the same.

According to numbers compiled by online advertiser Chitika, only 55 percent of iPod touch users have paid the fee to upgrade their devices to OS 3.0 or higher. Nearly 95 percent of iPhone users have made the free upgrade. These numbers were based on the sampling of traffic across the Chitika advertising network.

Chitiaka attributes this, aside from the obvious price difference, to OS 3.X having little to offer the typical iPod touch user. "Push notifications? MMS? Tethering? Essentially useless on a device that relies on WiFi for a connection. iPod touch users are essentially asked to pay for copy/paste, in-app purchases, and the ability to buy a segment of the latest apps from the app store."

Apple released iPhone Software 3.0 in June, adding MMS, cut/copy/paste, landscape keyboard, and Spotlight Search among others. To upgrade the iPod touch's OS, one must pay $5 to $10, depending on the time at which they purchased the device.

post #2 of 91
Wow, amazing that significantly more people are willing to download a free upgrade, as opposed to a paid one.
post #3 of 91
Perhaps now that Apple is using different accounting rules, the next upgrade will be free for touchies as well as the iPhonies. Then, we'll see if there is a change in uptake of updates.
post #4 of 91
Quote:
iPod touch users slow to upgrade mobile OS


Given the information stated and the apparent greed for nearly nothing in return, it's really doesn't come as a shock to me that so few have upgraded.

I also suspect that a lot of people bought the iPod Touch as a MUSIC DEVICE, thinking it's the "latest iPod" and such haven't quite used it for anything else.

I had to tell several friends who bought the Touch that it can access the internet nearly like a computer. They don't see the sense in surfing with such a small screen.

A suspect a lot of Touchs went to kids, with no credit cards, thus not able to buy much of anything for the device.

So many people I know still click the "Big E" for internet, oblivious what that thing is that slides out of the front of the computer tower and they have to push it back in.
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post #5 of 91
I hope the executives at Apple who favor not charging for incremental updates gain ammunition from this report. One of the very significant advantages of the iPhone/iPod touch platform for developers is its homogeneity. If large numbers of customers opt out of upgrades, that invites all sorts of self-inflicted tech support problems.

It does not seem that anyone is buying the story about accounting issues forcing Apple to charge since none of its competitors seem to have that problem. Just quietly change the policy and gain a decided advantage over competitors by leaving behind as few customers as possible.
post #6 of 91
I was adamantly against upgrading my second-generation Touch to OS 3.

Then I happily downloaded some application updates and ... P'oh.

App upgrades really like 3.x.

Pah.
post #7 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Wow, amazing that significantly more people are willing to download a free upgrade, as opposed to a paid one.

I totally agree. Isn't this common sense. iLove my Apple, but iSorta feel touch users get the short end of the stick with these paid updates. Though correct me if I'm wrong, Apple did allow users of the touch to upgrade for free depending on what build of the OS they were running!? Which was announced at the September 2009 event (aka Return of the Jobsian ) (soooo glad he's back)
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post #8 of 91
I have an iPhone now, and don't have this problem, but when I had a Touch, I got really mad that they wanted $10 for an upgrade that didn't add much. I don't mind paying for a new OS if it is really an new OS, but for upgrades that should have been on the original, it really gets my goat. Apple should know that keeping people updated on the OS keep the app store more accessible to those customers, makes for a better user experience, and makes people buy new Apple products later down the line.
post #9 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Editor the Grate View Post

I was adamantly against upgrading my second-generation Touch to OS 3.

Then I happily downloaded some application updates and ... P'oh.

App upgrades really like 3.x.

Pah.

For 3.0, the developer changes were so radical that it seemed useless to continue development on iPhone 2.2.1 or earlier. Add to that the fact Apple pretty much forces all developers on Snow Leopard to use 3.0 or later, and you can't blame developers for only developing for 3.0 and later.
post #10 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

For 3.0, the developer changes were so radical that it seemed useless to continue development on iPhone 2.2.1 or earlier. Add to that the fact Apple pretty much forces all developers on Snow Leopard to use 3.0 or later, and you can't blame developers for only developing for 3.0 and later.

It's true that if you use iPhone OS 3.0 you get way more goodies as a developer, but it's not true that Snow Leopard forces you to 3.0. You can easily target 2.2 with all your builds in XCode, which makes you compatible with iPhone OS 2.2.

For now, a lot of developers are doing so and adding in special code/libraries to make their apps work under iPhone OS 2.2. However, increasingly apps and their upgrades are going to require 3.0 to make them smaller, faster, easier to maintain, and more feature-full. That will likely drag the last iPod Touch 2.2 users kicking and screaming over to 3.0.
post #11 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

That will likely drag the last iPod Touch 2.2 users kicking and screaming over to 3.0.

I wouldn't be kicking and screaming if the update to 3.0 was free.
post #12 of 91
I would imagine 1st gen itouch owners would be better off not upgrading, since 3.0 runs slower than frozen molasses on those older systems.
post #13 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

It's true that if you use iPhone OS 3.0 you get way more goodies as a developer, but it's not true that Snow Leopard forces you to 3.0. You can easily target 2.2 with all your builds in XCode, which makes you compatible with iPhone OS 2.2.


Perhaps you missed the PRETTY MUCH that I put there.

While it does give you the ABILITY to target 2.2.1 on device, it doesn't in simulator, a pretty much standard requirement for quickly designing and building new applications.

Read a post before you try and correct it.
post #14 of 91
I own an iTouch and was not happy about the fee to upgrade but was basically forced to pay it because some of my purchased apps would update and then be useless until I upgraded the OS. Sad face. It should have been a free upgrade.
post #15 of 91
the best part of paying for hte upgrade to 3.0 on my iPod was when it majorly slowed down the normal activity... that part was great. Oh, and then the discounted upgrade that happened a month or so after I paid full price.
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post #16 of 91
Before they changed their accounting practices ( and hopefully therefore will be allowing free updates ) Apple should hav just bundled the OS update with a good game, or an itunes gift card or something.
post #17 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderville View Post

I own an iTouch and was not happy about the fee to upgrade but was basically forced to pay it because some of my purchased apps would update and then be useless until I upgraded the OS. Sad face. It should have been a free upgrade.

You can de-upgrade apps by going into your ~/Music/iTunes/Mobile Applications/ directory, deleting the new version of the app (the .ipa file with the highest number), then loading iTunes and double-clicking on the app. It will prompt you to find the app. Select the older .ipa file and sync.
post #18 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

Perhaps you missed the PRETTY MUCH that I put there.

While it does give you the ABILITY to target 2.2.1 on device, it doesn't in simulator, a pretty much standard requirement for quickly designing and building new applications.

Read a post before you try and correct it.

Sorry, didn't realize some folks still used the simulator. I found it too limiting and too different from the actual device to make it basically useless and never use it anyway. I didn't see not having a 2.2 simulator as any sort of hinderance at all, but if you use it I can see your point.
post #19 of 91
PC users don't upgrade everthing that Vendors tell them too.

They do their homework and if it's advantagous they will upgrade otherwise they will pass.

It's common for all PC users (hence XP being here for a decade).

This is not new news it's just poor forecasting for current user base.
post #20 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngusYoung View Post

PC users don't upgrade everthing that Vendors tell them too.

They do their homework and if it's advantagous they will upgrade otherwise they will pass.

It's common for all PC users (hence XP being here for a decade).

This is not new news it's just poor forecasting for current user base.

Most PC users don't upgrade ANYTHING vendors tell them too. Most don't do any homework either. They stick with what came on the device and never upgrade unless a trusted advisor gives them a darned good reason to. That, as much as anything, is why XP is still in such a dominant position.

Mac users tend to be a different bunch. Some are well informed and make their own choices, but many just want their computer to work and don't want to know how any of the technical details. However, both groups seem to have a relatively high level of trust in what Apple recommends.

If Apple is surprised by these figures it's because they naïvely believe that all their customers trust them and will automatically do what they're told. Most people are too smart, paranoid or lazy to follow every decree that issues forth from Cupertino.
post #21 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple released iPhone Software 3.0 in June, adding MMS, cut/copy/paste, landscape keyboard, and Spotlight Search among others. To upgrade the iPod touch's OS, one must pay $5 to $10, depending on the time at which they purchased the device.

I don't think that decision is very smart because if those ipod touch owners bought 10 x $3 apps that were only 3.0 compatible, they make their revenue back anyway. I know that being forced to pay for upgrades that iphone owners get for free would put me off supporting Apple's entire distribution method. I'd stop spending money on apps and use the ipod just for music.
post #22 of 91
I upgraded to 3.0 within days of its release. I'm very happy with the added features, and I feel like the $10 is a nominal charge.
I am also surprised about the negative posts here regarding the upgrade software fee that most people would gladly pay for other computers. Because let's face it, the iPod touch is a hand-held computer. The upgrade is less than a third for the latest Snow Leopard upgrade, and it's less than 10 percent of the latest Windows upgrade.
If you want upgrades free obtain a hand-held Linux computer, if there is one, or buy an iPhone and pay the monthly fee for operating one.
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post #23 of 91
Cheap bastards.
post #24 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdbryan View Post

I hope the executives at Apple who favor not charging

It's about accounting rules, no executive wants
post #25 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

I know that being forced to pay for upgrades that iphone owners get for free

Why are you pissed at Apple? They felt compelled to do it because of then current accounting regulations. All these people clamoring for government regulation to save them from themselves, here is one of your unintended consequences of not thought-through regulations. When you see stories in the news about congress "enacting new protections for consumers" you can expect more unintended consequences like this.

And yes, there are other companies that have similar products like the iPod touch and they provide free updates - however they probably also weren't investigated and scrutinized by the SEC for stock backdating either. I don't blame Apple for following the letter of the law. By casting light on just how stupid it was, I'm sure Apple was a major reason the rules were updated and clarified.

Just because a law is stupid doesn't mean you should ignore it - kudos to Apple for doing the right thing, even though it they ended up taking the brunt of the criticism from uniformed consumers instead of being pissed at the stupid regulations enacted by congress.
post #26 of 91

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iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
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post #27 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

While nearly 95 percent of iPhone users have upgraded to iPhone 3.0 or greater, only 55 percent of iPod touch users have done the same.

Perhaps the major difference is simply ignorance.

We have three iPod Touches and only I have upgraded. Yet when I asked my son and wife why they hadn't, they claimed they didn't know anything about it. To which I reminded them that I had informed them immediately after it came out, and a number of times since. And it is free to them, I already paid for the upgrade.

Their point: Why? Do I have to. I am quite happy, don't mess with it.

The same holds true for many of my friends, colleagues and clients who are still behind in their touches as well, much like their OS's. Everytime I troubleshoot their Macs, I even have to tell them how to upgrade either their OS or apps.

Cripes, look how many times people here have shown their ignorance as well, i.e., not knowing about updates or even how to do it. A lot won't even touch the OK button when automatically notified that an OS/App update is available. Even if free.

Heck, a lot don't even use command-z.
post #28 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


Heck, a lot don't even use command-z.

Why would I do a command-z when I can shake my iPhone?

I kid

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MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

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iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

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post #29 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

It's about accounting rules, no executive wants

There is no accounting rule which dictates that you have to charge a price for anything.
post #30 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

Sorry, didn't realize some folks still used the simulator. I found it too limiting and too different from the actual device to make it basically useless and never use it anyway. I didn't see not having a 2.2 simulator as any sort of hinderance at all, but if you use it I can see your point.

It depends on the types of applications you're developing. For most non-hardware related UIKit apps (so apps that don't use hardware features, like accellerometer, gps etc or OpenGL) then it's still important in your development cycle.

Adding onto that that all templates are built only for iPhone OS 3, and must be manually pushed back to 2.2.1, then it's understandable when developers start developing for 3.0 only.

Also, while libraries HELP 2.2.1 backdating, nothing is as good as the 3.0 optimizations as they're directly in the kit. Developers have good reason in some cases to avoid 2.2.1 as 3.0 has optimizations in the kit that we as developers couldn't do as we don't have access to private areas of the kit.

I understand users pushing for 2.2.1 support. But I can also understand why some developers push for 3.0 and later only.

Personally, I mostly use Core Data for databasing, which is a 3.0 and later technology. Unfortunately, that forces me to stay on 3.0 and later only.
post #31 of 91
OK. They'll upgrade when they upgrade. The point is, they have an iPod Touch.
post #32 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Why are you pissed at Apple? They felt compelled to do it because of then current accounting regulations. All these people clamoring for government regulation to save them from themselves, here is one of your unintended consequences of not thought-through regulations. When you see stories in the news about congress "enacting new protections for consumers" you can expect more unintended consequences like this.

And yes, there are other companies that have similar products like the iPod touch and they provide free updates - however they probably also weren't investigated and scrutinized by the SEC for stock backdating either. I don't blame Apple for following the letter of the law. By casting light on just how stupid it was, I'm sure Apple was a major reason the rules were updated and clarified.

Just because a law is stupid doesn't mean you should ignore it - kudos to Apple for doing the right thing, even though it they ended up taking the brunt of the criticism from uniformed consumers instead of being pissed at the stupid regulations enacted by congress.

apple admitted that the application store took off so quickly because they had a customer base with software updated on their phones.. they realize how important it is to have their customer base upgrade to new software... it is as you say, an accounting snafu.. Now, with the changes coming in non gaap earnings reporting, it might be assumed that rather than being stuck with amortizing the ipod touch over 24 months like the phone if free upgrades are given (which apple surely wants the customer to do but apple could not give away free upgrades in the past unless they accounted for the ipod touch like they have had to do with the iphone.

now, apple will be able to in the future attach a small dollar amount in the sale price of ipod touch or iphone for software upgrades over say the next two years for example - and claim the remainder as profit on the sale just like other products they sell. being stuck with writing off the phone over 24 months up until a recent change in the law has directly affected the ipod touch (in order to give away software on the touch they would have had to account for it as subscription accounting).

we will find out how apple will report deferred subscription earnings on the phone in the next quarter or before the end of 2010 for sure. At that time, a new policy on the touch upgrades might also be offered as free upgrades for 24 months.. or more..?

right now, apple has around 15 billion in deferred earnings that will be subdivided into profit and deferred revenue to pay for software upgrades of the phone. this large amount deferred was the problem - as it is way more than necessary to keep the subscription cost on the phone 100% covered with software upgrades and warranty service over the 24 month contract period on phone service. but that was how the law was written in the past .. and it has just recently been changed.

apple likely never wanted to charge for software upgrades for the ipod touch.. they were forced to by law or they would have had to amortize the ipod touch over 24 months just like the phone. this has been a real problem for them.
post #33 of 91
What percentage of iPhone users are under 18 versus iPod Touch users?

I would think that there are not a lot of folks under the age of 18 using iPhones - at least not those who have their own credit cards and such - meaning that paid or otherwise the user of an iPhone is far more likely to be someone who would have the means to pay for an upgrade. Compared to how many iPod Touch units have been bought for folks under 18 - who do not have a credit card of their own - perhaps not even a computer of their own? (yes my sister had an iPod for a while without a computer suitable to attach it to - she recently got a new computer - but had given away the iPod since she could not use it effectively - but that was not a touch - a standard iPod is quite limited if you do not have a computer to attach it to).

So yes feature function relative to price point must certainly be a factor - but don't forget demographics.
post #34 of 91
I'm in India and a lot of my friends don't have access to any Wi-Fi network. They've bought iPod touchs only for its movie capability and UI. I hope I've got my point across well.
Apple must put wireless inernet capability on its iPod touchs.
iPhone users take advantage of mobile networks easily.
post #35 of 91
I wonder what the percentage of those who upgraded did so legitimately? It's so easy to install the update without paying, I'm surprised that more people haven't upgraded.
post #36 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by rahulsbhagat View Post

I'm in India and a lot of my friends don't have access to any Wi-Fi network. They've bought iPod touchs only for its movie capability and UI. I hope I've got my point across well.
Apple must put wireless inernet capability on its iPod touchs.
iPhone users take advantage of mobile networks easily.

If you have access to someone with a wired connection and a wireless card - you should be able to use internet connection sharing to create your own wi-fi hot spot from the computer to the iPod - even if that wired connection is a dial up modem or cellular card. Of course what you can do with that connection may be limited by its available bandwidth and throughput.
post #37 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

If you have access to someone with a wired connection and a wireless card - you should be able to use internet connection sharing to create your own wi-fi hot spot from the computer to the iPod - even if that wired connection is a dial up modem or cellular card. Of course what you can do with that connection may be limited by its available bandwidth and throughput.

Sorry, I meant like mobile carriers's Internet networks.. Kinda like 3G capabilities for surfing,
post #38 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by rahulsbhagat View Post

Sorry, I meant like mobile carriers's Internet networks.. Kinda like 3G capabilities for surfing,

yes that would definitely be a good idea - though it would require a hardware upgrade and a subscription I would think - what i was suggesting is a way for current Wi-Fi only iPod touch units to get access to the internet in places where there is no Wi-Fi offered by service providers or other hot spots - if you have wired access in a computer that has a Wi-Fi card you can get your iPod Touch on the internet without built in cellular capability or monthly fees.
post #39 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

And yes, there are other companies that have similar products like the iPod touch and they provide free updates - however they probably also weren't investigated and scrutinized by the SEC for stock backdating either. I don't blame Apple for following the letter of the law. By casting light on just how stupid it was, I'm sure Apple was a major reason the rules were updated and clarified.

I don't buy the suggestion that Apple are being forced to charge users for non-subscription devices:

http://www.macworld.com/article/1319...ipodtouch.html

There are too many inconsistencies and no reason why it has to be so expensive. If Apple are being forced to do it, why would they charge $20 for the 2.0 upgrade and $10 for the 3.0? Why not $1 each? $30 is not a trivial amount to add onto the cost of a device for upgrades that are free for the iphone, even on PAYG (non-subscription) tariffs.
post #40 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

There is no accounting rule which dictates that you have to charge a price for anything.

Well put.
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