or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Possible Apple tablet multi-touch tactile keyboard detailed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Possible Apple tablet multi-touch tactile keyboard detailed

post #1 of 61
Thread Starter 
Apple's forthcoming tablet could employ a dynamic surface that gives users tactile feedback when typing in order to identify individual keys, according to a new patent application revealed this week.

Using an "articulating frame," the surface of such a device would create physical bumps or dots for the user to feel when it is in keyboard mode. Those surface features would retract and disappear when the device is not being used to type. It is detailed in an application entitled "Keystroke Tactility Arrangement on a Smooth Touch Surface." It is similar to an application first filed back in 2007.

"The articulating frame may provide key edge ridges that define the boundaries of the key regions or may provide tactile feedback mechanisms within the key regions," the application reads. "The articulating frame may also be configured to cause concave depressions similar to mechanical key caps in the surface."

The tactile feedback keyboard is revealed as one anonymous source told The New York Times that users would be "surprised" how they interact with the tablet.

Another example in the application describes a rigid, non-articulating frame beneath the surface. It would provide higher resistance when pressing away from the key centers, but softer resistance at the center of a virtual key, guiding hands to the proper location.



The patent notes that pointing and typing require very different needs: Pointing is best on a smooth surface with little friction, while typing is preferred on keys with edges that fingertips can feel. Simply putting Braille-like dots on the 'F' and 'J' keys, as is on most physical keyboards, is not enough, because it does not address alignment issues with outside keys.

Conversely, while placing dots on every single key on a surface would help a user find their location, it would take away the smooth surface necessary for touch controls that users are accustomed to on a glass screen like the iPhone.

The patent aims to offer the best of both worlds with a new device that could dynamically change its surface.



"Preferably, each key edge comprises one to four distinct bars or Braille-like dots," the application reads. "When constructed in conjunction with a capacitive multi-touch surface, the key edge ridges should separated to accommodate the routing of the drive electrodes, which may take the form of rows, columns, or other configurations."

The system would also intelligently determine when the user wishes to type, and when they intend to use the screen as a pointing device.

"Specifically, the recognition software commands lowering of the frame when lateral sliding gestures or mouse clicking activity chords are detected on the surface," the application states. Alternatively, when homing chords (i.e., placing the fingers on the home row) or asynchronous touches (typing activity) is detected on the surface, the recognition software commands raising of the frame."

Apple filed the Application on Aug. 28, 2009. The invention is credited to Wayne Carl Westerman of San Francisco, Calif.

Another Apple patent application revealed this week deals with a multi-touch controller that uses transparent touch sensors and does not require an opaque surface. The description is included in a patent application entitled "Multipoint Touch Surface Controller."

"While virtually all commercially available touch screen based systems available today provide single point detection only and have limited resolution and speed, other products available today are able to detect multiple touch points," the application reads. "Unfortunately, these products only work on opaque surfaces because of the circuitry that must be placed behind the electrode structure."

The described invention would include drive electronics that stimulate the multi-touch sensor and sensing circuits for reading the sensor in a single integrated package. This is said to be different from some previous multi-touch technology, which has been limited in terms of detectable points due to the size of the detection circuitry.



The invention, filed for by Apple on Aug. 27, 2009, is credited to Steven P. Hotelling, Christoph H. Krah and Brian Quentin Huppi of California.



In October, another patent application showed off how a multi-touch tablet interface might work, with a surface that could detect ten individual fingers, along with resting palms, and identify each of them separately. The hand-based system was said to allow "unprecedented integration of typing, resting, pointing, scrolling, 3D manipulation, and handwriting into a versatile, ergonomic computer input device."

Apple is said to have been at work on its rumored tablet device device for many years and has been the number one focus of CEO Steve Jobs since returning to his company this summer.
post #2 of 61
The tactile surface has been done before but in a hugely clunky fashion so this should be pretty interesting if they got it to work in a tablet form. It's also been one of those elements missing from creating a Starfire like work surface.

http://www.asktog.com/starfire/
post #3 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Another Apple patent application revealed this week deals with a multi-touch controller that uses transparent touch sensors and does not require an opaque surface. The description is included in a patent application entitled "Multipoint Touch Surface Controller."

for me this is the most interesting part, how is it gonna' look like, tranparent enough.
post #4 of 61
Getting more excited already! As with the iPhone, we can expect great innovations from Apple.

I'm not sure how much professionals will get out of this machine, since there's mostly talk about watching movies, and reading papers, magazines and books.

Too bad that so many possible features are already made public way before the actual presentation. It takes a little bit away from the surprise effects. But that will be unavoidable I guess, in fact, more and more so.
post #5 of 61
One thing is for certain, Apple will...yet again...shake the industry with this tablet device. Godspeed Steve...Godspeed
iPhone 4 32GB (black), iPod touch 32GB, iPad Wi-Fi + 3G 64GB, iPod classic 80 GB (white) 160GB (black), 2x 5th gen iPod 30GB (black + white), iMac 27", MacBook Pro 17", Time Capsule 1TB, Apple TV
Reply
iPhone 4 32GB (black), iPod touch 32GB, iPad Wi-Fi + 3G 64GB, iPod classic 80 GB (white) 160GB (black), 2x 5th gen iPod 30GB (black + white), iMac 27", MacBook Pro 17", Time Capsule 1TB, Apple TV
Reply
post #6 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

a surface that could detect ten individual fingers, along with resting palms, and identify each of them separately.

Lets get rid of all that wasted space below my keyboard on my MBP. Give me full multitouch across the entire palm rest with visual feedback.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Roos24 View Post

I'm not sure how much professionals will get out of this machine, since there's mostly talk about watching movies, and reading papers, magazines and books.

I suppose wirelessly controlling presentations could be effective, but weve seen Apple forcus on the consumer end of things first and foremost. I admit I couldnt see how a tablet could be used at all but I was thinking about the previous tablets running a desktop OS and thinking failure, not the currently proposed device with a tailor ecosystem.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #7 of 61
Tactile keyboard rumored... tactile keyboard missing from device when announced... everyone disappointed.

In every rumor mill, there's a point at which expectations get set in unrealistic ways. I seriously doubt there is going to be a virtual keyboard on this thing. If there's not, everyone that reads this story is going to be wanting more despite the fact that the tablet will likely be an extremely good and usable device.
post #8 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by bweston View Post

Tactile keyboard rumored... tactile keyboard missing from device when announced... everyone disappointed.

In every rumor mill, there's a point at which expectations get set in unrealistic ways. I seriously doubt there is going to be a virtual keyboard on this thing. If there's not, everyone that reads this story is going to be wanting more despite the fact that the tablet will likely be an extremely good and usable device.

Im expecting an ULV Core-i7, a dual-core Atom and a Cortex-A9 ARM. Anything less than all three and Im going to come onto AI to spout nonsense about Apple being doomed.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #9 of 61
Not counting on this one. A tactile keyboard with bumps is just... weird. And over engineered (read: sloppy).
post #10 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I’m expecting an ULV Core-i7, a dual-core Atom and a Cortex-A9 ARM. Anything less than all three and I’m going to come onto AI to spout nonsense about Apple being doomed.

will the world explode if you do that?
post #11 of 61
I don't believe this tactile keyboard will make it. This is research boys.

When someone says that we will be surprised by the way we interact with the device, I think it refers to touch gestures that we all know because of the iPhone and iPod touch but that we cannot find on any other devices.
post #12 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfmartin67 View Post

I don't believe this tactile keyboard will make it. This is research boys.

When someone says that we will be surprised by the way we interact with the device, I think it refers to touch gestures that we all know because of the iPhone and iPod touch but that we cannot find on any other devices.

This, I think. The implementation of touch on the iPhone is limited by the size of the screen. On a larger, 7"-10" device, there is the opportunity for multi-fingered swipes, tosses, flicks and taps with the kind of virtual physics that we haven't seen before.

Tapping the side of the device to move between screens or pages? Tilt scrolling? User definable three and four fingered taps? A toss gesture to wirelessly move files to another device?

Have no idea, but I would guess the innovation is how the thing is handled.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #13 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's forthcoming tablet could employ a dynamic surface that gives users tactile feedback when typing ...

All I can say is ... I hope not.

IMO it's an invention that addresses an illusory need.
post #14 of 61
Voice control is a possibility as well.
post #15 of 61
A lot of this smells like market manipulation. I suspect traders have accumulated the stock on the dips and now they get to release all these "news" in a low volume day. Cha-Ching!

Sure, there may be an Apple Tablet in the works... but a lot of this is known. Now somebody is rehashing old news and pumping the stock.

BTW, I have been long the stock but these "news" still smell manipulation.
post #16 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfmartin67 View Post

I don't believe this tactile keyboard will make it. This is research boys.

When someone says that we will be surprised by the way we interact with the device, I think it refers to touch gestures that we all know because of the iPhone and iPod touch but that we cannot find on any other devices.

I'd have to agree. The patent applications were filed in August of this year, which means this is just a concept and a prototype may not have even been built. I would be surprised if there was one, but if by a miraculous act it appears on the tablet, I would be pleasantly surprised...though I'm not holding my breath for it.
post #17 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by eehd View Post

I'd have to agree. The patent applications were filed in August of this year, which means this is just a concept and a prototype may not have even been built. I would be surprised if there was one, but if by a miraculous act it appears on the tablet, I would be pleasantly surprised...though I'm not holding my breath for it.

I seem to recall that some patents were filled right before the iPhone release, but I have to agree that this patent seems too early to reach development.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #18 of 61
this sounds like a great solution, but i highly doubt it would come in a $600 package... perhaps $2000.
post #19 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

This, I think. The implementation of touch on the iPhone is limited by the size of the screen. On a larger, 7"-10" device, there is the opportunity for multi-fingered swipes, tosses, flicks and taps with the kind of virtual physics that we haven't seen before.

Tapping the side of the device to move between screens or pages? Tilt scrolling? User definable three and four fingered taps? A toss gesture to wirelessly move files to another device?

Have no idea, but I would guess the innovation is how the thing is handled.

The problem with a virtual keyboard on a small device like a 7"-10" device is that unless you have two multi-touch displays you're taking up most of the screen real estate for the keyboard.

If the keyboard will be there a lot, then you might as well have a MBA like device that can swivel to tablet format rather than including the expense of a second display that 70-90% of the time is just showing the keyboard.
post #20 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I can say is ... I hope not.

IMO it's an invention that addresses an illusory need.

It's a real need if you want a usable keyboard. It's also an enabler for a lot of useful UI enhancements.
post #21 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowayout11 View Post

Not counting on this one. A tactile keyboard with bumps is just... weird. And over engineered (read: sloppy).

Is it me, or is the design just begging to produce a "dead bumps" quality snafu?

While a dynamic touch keyboard sounds great in concept, let's come back after one's been through a few years of wear & tear.
post #22 of 61
Awesome stuff!!
Finally more tablet rumors.
Thank god these aren't stupid analysts talking shit but something slight more real!
Hope I get to see that tablet next month. Don't think I'll buy it yet. Second iteration is key.
post #23 of 61
It would seem rather risky for Apple to go with this technology for a new tablet. I'm worried because the critics will be busily looking for any minor problem to destroy the tablet. It would have to be spot-on perfect. I don't care whether they use this technology or not as far as personal use is concerned. I can easily live with a standard virtual keyboard. However, if this keyboard technology were to work as advertised, Apple would probably own the tablet industry providing many people even want a tablet computer. I figure the tablet has to be at least as good as a standard iPod Touch, so how much of a failure could it be. It would have to be more popular than a Newton was. I'm not getting my expectations up for this touch-screen technology because this patent use in the tablet is purely speculation.
post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

It's a real need if you want a usable keyboard. It's also an enabler for a lot of useful UI enhancements.

I've got a feeling people will think of this as a sort of non-issue in the future tough.

People *always* say things like "It's not a real ..." or "It's not a useable ..." <insert term> when a new technology comes out.

A lot of very intelligent and capable people still think the only "real" keyboards are the ones with centimetre high keys that travel a millimetre or two when you hit them and sound an audible clicking sound. A lot of other (older) intelligent people will tell you that you haven't "really" typed until you've done it on an IBM Selectric electric typewriter.

*Fun Fact: When the computer first came out most high end typists could actually type faster on the electric typewriter than they could on the computer keyboard.

That didn't stop the computer from wiping the floor with electric typewriters though, and it doesn't mean that won't all be fingering our smooth glass displays for many years to come.
post #25 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

A lot of this smells like market manipulation. I suspect traders have accumulated the stock on the dips and now they get to release all these "news" in a low volume day. Cha-Ching!

Sure, there may be an Apple Tablet in the works... but a lot of this is known. Now somebody is rehashing old news and pumping the stock.

BTW, I have been long the stock but these "news" still smell manipulation.

And this time it's working like a charm! Up nearly 3.5% this morning... That'll help Santa with the presents...

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

Reply
post #26 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

And this time it's working like a charm! Up nearly 3.5% this morning... That'll help Santa with the presents...

Up to $209 now, wowzer of a stock play there. Good job guys, you fooled us.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I've got a feeling people will think of this as a sort of non-issue in the future tough.

People *always* say things like "It's not a real ..." or "It's not a useable ..." <insert term> when a new technology comes out.

A lot of very intelligent and capable people still think the only "real" keyboards are the ones with centimetre high keys that travel a millimetre or two when you hit them and sound an audible clicking sound. A lot of other (older) intelligent people will tell you that you haven't "really" typed until you've done it on an IBM Selectric electric typewriter.

*Fun Fact: When the computer first came out most high end typists could actually type faster on the electric typewriter than they could on the computer keyboard.

That didn't stop the computer from wiping the floor with electric typewriters though, and it doesn't mean that won't all be fingering our smooth glass displays for many years to come.

I have typed on a Selectric keyboard and there is none better. They are big, clunky, and LOUD (like my 1969 Camaro) but like the Camaro they are super fast. They have no place in the modern sleek small and highly designed world of personal computers, iPhones, and iTablets but make no mistake about it the Selectric keyboard is a very good input device.
post #28 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

A lot of other (older) intelligent people will tell you that you haven't "really" typed until you've done it on an IBM Selectric electric typewriter.

You haven't.

Seriously, a lot probably depends on what a person is used to.

Personally, I HATED Apple's current desktop keyboards at first. But after a while I've come to really like it, and would have a tough time going back to an older-style PC board. Perhaps Apple's current keyboard is just one step towards a bigger goal?

Time will tell if the venture into zero feedback touch-keys is the correct path. Some things need feedback (think of the steering and brakes on a motor vehicle); we'll see if the keyboard proves the same.
post #29 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I've got a feeling people will think of this as a sort of non-issue in the future tough.

People *always* say things like "It's not a real ..." or "It's not a useable ..." <insert term> when a new technology comes out.

Except with this technology you can have both. It allows you to not have to look at the keyboard to have a tactile reference point to where your fingers are.

You also ignore the advantages of tactile reference points on a surface as a UI mechanism. See the linked Starfire concept video from the 90s. The paper and other objects on the display surface was ridged so you would find it on your desk without needing to look at it just like real paper.

Quote:
*Fun Fact: When the computer first came out most high end typists could actually type faster on the electric typewriter than they could on the computer keyboard.

That didn't stop the computer from wiping the floor with electric typewriters though, and it doesn't mean that won't all be fingering our smooth glass displays for many years to come.

You should note that current day keyboards are still very close to typewriter keyboards. Less travel but the same tactile reference points.
post #30 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowayout11 View Post

Not counting on this one. A tactile keyboard with bumps is just... weird. And over engineered (read: sloppy).

post #31 of 61
Why would Apple choose to have the patent applications published less than 4 months from the date of filing (August 27, 2009), rather than wait the standard/default 18 months? Is this merely to obviate Jobs' needing to say during the public unveiling, "And boy, have we patented it!" as he did for the original iPhone?
post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

Why would Apple choose to have the patent applications published less than 4 months from the date of filing (August 27, 2009), rather than wait the standard/default 18 months? Is this merely to obviate Jobs' needing to say during the public unveiling, "And boy, have we patented it!" as he did for the original iPhone?

Maybe it's a red herring to get companies who try to copy Apple to invest R&D resources in something similar. I don't think the tactile feedback concept will be used by Apple. With the ability of the screen sensors to be able to recognize the entire hand, isn't it possible that the tablet could place the keys under the fingers, wherever the user placed them on the screen (half of the keyboard under the left hand and half under the right hand)?
post #33 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

Except with this technology you can have both. It allows you to not have to look at the keyboard to have a tactile reference point to where your fingers are ... You also ignore the advantages of tactile reference points on a surface as a UI mechanism ...

True. This concept only has "legs" in touch typing scenarios.

I don't have a crystal ball, but I would argue that most typing on the new virtual keyboards is going to be done on mobile devices that one holds in one's hands, not something lying on a table top or your lap that you can position your fingers over in standard touch typing fashion. Using the portrait mode keyboard on the iPhone and typing with one's thumbs while holding it in your hands is far far faster than lying the iPhone down or even holding it in landscape mode for instance. You can almost tell the "old school" users by their attempts to lay the phone down on a table and use it like a regular keyboard.

As a side note, I wold say that in my experience almost every computer user I've made aware of the little bumps on the "F" and "J" "home keys" is both shocked and surprised that they are even there, and most don't notice them and don't touch type.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

... You should note that current day keyboards are still very close to typewriter keyboards. Less travel but the same tactile reference points.

Indeed. It may have come across that I was dissing the IBM Selectric when in fact I used to use one myself and its a fantastic machine that I am sure is in a technology museum somewhere. The only downside of old typewriters was the physical effort of moving the keys. The IBM electric did that for you in a very efficient way, making typing a breeze and really speeding up the whole process.

Before the Selectric I used this (in yellow though):
post #34 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

The problem with a virtual keyboard on a small device like a 7"-10" device is that unless you have two multi-touch displays you're taking up most of the screen real estate for the keyboard.

If the keyboard will be there a lot, then you might as well have a MBA like device that can swivel to tablet format rather than including the expense of a second display that 70-90% of the time is just showing the keyboard.

I guess it depends on what you think people will be using a tablet for.

I assume people will use a tablet for watching videos, looking at pictures, surfing, email, texting, playing games and gps. Pretty much like they're using their netbooks, and unlikely to necessitate invoking the keyboard a lot.

For that level of text entry, I think a slightly smaller than standard (the keyboard on my MBP is 10" wide, a 10" diagonal tablet would be 8" wide) virtual keyboard would be fine, especially if it used the iPhones pop-up letter confirmation and probability mapping. Half the screen in landscape would still leave enough room to display 8 or so lines of text-- not much more off putting than entering text into the the text box I'm using now to post this.

I'm assuming that Apple has carefully weighted the tradeoffs among size, weight and functionality; I would guess that if it's a 10" device the loss of a real keyboard will be offset by an extremely thin and light form factor, which is the reason you would pick this over a netbook.

I'm also assuming that the reports of "surprising" user interaction have to do with Apple thinking a lot about how you would physically relate to a device this size, at a very tactile level. The various styles of iPhone UI demonstrate, I think, that it's possible to have a "real" computing experience without text input being the primary means of interaction.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #35 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

True. This concept only has "legs" in touch typing scenarios.

I don't have a crystal ball, but I would argue that most typing on the new virtual keyboards is going to be done on mobile devices that one holds in one's hands, not something lying on a table top or your lap that you can position your fingers over in standard touch typing fashion. Using the portrait mode keyboard on the iPhone and typing with one's thumbs while holding it in your hands is far far faster than lying the iPhone down or even holding it in landscape mode for instance. You can almost tell the "old school" users by their attempts to lay the phone down on a table and use it like a regular keyboard.

As a side note, I wold say that in my experience almost every computer user I've made aware of the little bumps on the "F" and "J" "home keys" is both shocked and surprised that they are even there, and most don't notice them and don't touch type.

Indeed. It may have come across that I was dissing the IBM Selectric when in fact I used to use one myself and its a fantastic machine that I am sure is in a technology museum somewhere. The only downside of old typewriters was the physical effort of moving the keys. The IBM electric did that for you in a very efficient way, making typing a breeze and really speeding up the whole process.

Before the Selectric I used this (in yellow though):

I've got a turn of the 20th century ribbon feed typewriter made by Royal still works correctly.
post #36 of 61
Two screens, hinged, one with tactile feedback that can be oriented anywhere, left-side, right-side, below like a keyboard or flipped all the way around for reverse side input with visual and tactile feedback. This is the only design that a answers all the questions for use as a netbook with keyboard, a media player with stand, a touch screen game system, an ereader with lots of screen space and a tablet with surprising interaction.
post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roos24 View Post

Getting more excited already! As with the iPhone, we can expect great innovations from Apple.

I'm not sure how much professionals will get out of this machine, since there's mostly talk about watching movies, and reading papers, magazines and books.

Too bad that so many possible features are already made public way before the actual presentation. It takes a little bit away from the surprise effects. But that will be unavoidable I guess, in fact, more and more so.

there's gonna be something that nobody thought of yet, something amazing.. thats what keeps me excited
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtfitzp View Post

Two screens, hinged, one with tactile feedback that can be oriented anywhere, left-side, right-side, below like a keyboard or flipped all the way around for reverse side input with visual and tactile feedback. This is the only design that a answers all the questions for use as a netbook with keyboard, a media player with stand, a touch screen game system, an ereader with lots of screen space and a tablet with surprising interaction.

Apple does not like hinges. I doubt they even like them on their own laptops.
post #39 of 61
I'm still stunned by seeing an Apple patent application with well drawn hands.
They are almost too good! Fake?
post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtfitzp View Post

Two screens, hinged, one with tactile feedback that can be oriented anywhere, left-side, right-side, below like a keyboard or flipped all the way around for reverse side input with visual and tactile feedback. This is the only design that a answers all the questions for use as a netbook with keyboard, a media player with stand, a touch screen game system, an ereader with lots of screen space and a tablet with surprising interaction.

I don't see apple going that route. It seems to clunky and with all the hinges and whatnot just more to break. I want a unibody 7-10 inch tablet with an OS between the iphones and OS X.. and the Ilife/iwork groups. Under $1000, no 3G plan for me.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Possible Apple tablet multi-touch tactile keyboard detailed