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Apple TV 3.0 update not helping sales as AirPort routers lose share - Page 2

post #41 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Absolutely. Airport routers have a far more intuitive setup and configuration than anything I've ever seen on the PC market. The problems are:

1) Apple don't seem to do a very good job of promoting this ease of use compared to others

2) Many consumers are cheapskates and are hard-pressed to pay extra for elegant design and ease of use

3) Wifi networks are often installed by "the cable guy" or some other "PC guy", who are unlikely to recommend an Apple product.

I also think Airport Express is an awesome product, but with wifi access becoming more commonplace, they're not as essential a travel accessory as they used to be.

ease of use is nice, what about security? and not just encryption. can you disable SSID broadcasts, enable MAC filtering, lessen broadcasting power to lessen your range and other features that aren't intuitive?
post #42 of 212
No surprise that aTV isn't selling, there's no compelling reason to get it and there are competing boxes that offer much more.

I'd probably buy an aTV if it could stream Hulu, abc.com, netflix, and any other web video. I don't even really think dvd ripping (never gonna happen) or even other codec support is that important, on a new i7 machine handbrake can convert an hour show in about six minutes.

At this point, I'd consider something like a PS3 way before an aTV, it can do bluray (which doesn't interest me at all, but I'll probably get into it at some point just because I don't want to buy any more movies in DVD format), stream netflix, and play other video formats. Not to mention I hear it's not a bad game console, all for not much more than the aTV.

aTV isn't a bad hardware box, it just needs to be able to play back a ton more things. Or a price drop to like $99. Or both.

None of the airports have ever appealed to me, don't really get it.
post #43 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

So what's stopping anyone form importing their DVD's? I have 2 TB's of movies almost all of which is from my DVD collection. Get a copy of hanbrake and be done with it.

The typical consumer is going to ask "Why bother?"

Ripping CDs to use on an mp3 player makes sense. It is a portable device. Using mp3s saves you from carrying around a bulky collection of CDs. In addition, there are other advantages such as custom playlists that cannot be done with CDs.

This does not apply to movies. People are much less likely to carry movies around with them (especially on a daily basis) so increased portability is not really a factor and it is unlikely they want to use playlists or to randomize viewing order. Therefore, what is the benefit for the average consumer to make it worth their time, effort and money (cost of HDDs and the AppleTV)?

I have an AppleTV and do like the ability to easily navigate through a list of movies and simply pressing play. However, selecting a DVD off the shelf and inserting it into my DVD player is not really anymore effort.
post #44 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

What in the world are you babbling on about? Standard definition TVs no longer exist. CRT TVs no longer exist. Nobody manufacturers either one any longer. The only type TV you can buy today is HD, regardless of screen size. I see old crt and sd television sets out on the curb for trash pickup every single day. And the people who still have and use them are definitely not interested in any new fangled gadgets anyway. That's why they still have obsolete technology in the first place.

I mean, really, where are you coming from on this? I'd really like to know.

SDTV 's will last for a long long time. They aren't sold, but the number of households that have them in the U.S. is enormous. I have 1 hdtv and 2 sdtvs. I would buy an additional AppleTV if I could connect it to SDTV. I would also buy one for my parents if it supported sdtv.
post #45 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Sales of Apple's wireless streaming set-top-box are up less than 10 percent in 2009 on a unit-by-unit basis, Steven Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD Group, told AppleInsider. But without a definitive product to compare it against, its total market share presence is unknown.

Apple does nothing to push these.
They are fine for what they do but the limitations of what they do, they are pretty much only a simple way to connect your iTunes content to a televsion.
No DVR, DVD, easy way to get DVDs copied onto it.

Quote:
Sales of Apple's wireless streaming set-top-box

What "streaming" does it do?
post #46 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

ease of use is nice, what about security? and not just encryption. can you disable SSID broadcasts, enable MAC filtering, lessen broadcasting power to lessen your range and other features that aren't intuitive?

YES,
YES,
YES

If you want to know - look for Airport Network Design PDF under the Apple Support site.
post #47 of 212
the Apple TV still does not even let you stream from your iTunes purchased library... you still have to select what content you want on each Apple TV in the house from the computer. I would like to see "on-demand" technology from a home iTunes server... how hard can this really be???
post #48 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

ease of use is nice, what about security? and not just encryption. can you disable SSID broadcasts, enable MAC filtering, lessen broadcasting power to lessen your range and other features that aren't intuitive?

Yes to all of the above
RTFM
post #49 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

This does not apply to movies. People are much less likely to carry movies around with them (especially on a daily basis)...

I think you'd be surprised. I think a fair number of people are already doing it with iPods, and I think we'll see it skyrocket once the tablet ships.

Oh, and forgot to mention before, I'd totally buy a decent TV streaming box to use with my current SDTV. No plans to replace it before it dies, even if that's years from now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lsngctrl View Post

the Apple TV still does not even let you stream from your iTunes purchased library... you still have to select what content you want on each Apple TV in the house from the computer.

Is that right?
post #50 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

ease of use is nice, what about security? and not just encryption. can you disable SSID broadcasts, enable MAC filtering, lessen broadcasting power to lessen your range and other features that aren't intuitive?

Disabling SSID broadcasts is like dummy-locking your tool shed, it seems to be more secure but won't deter the guy who you are trying to keep out in the first place. Anyone with half a clue would be able to pick out your SSID from the airwaves using freely available software. Likewise, anyone can spoof a MAC address (most routers even have this built-in to fool early attempts by ISPs to needlessly sell additional IP addresses) . If the appearance of these type of "security features" keeps someone from encrypting their router traffic with WPA2, then it's actually counterproductive to securing their home or small business networks.

I think the best feature in the newer AEB is the guest network, which segregates a publicly available network (depending on configuration) from the secured, internal network. OBTW, configuration of this is ridiculously easy using the built-in Airport software. Your mother-in-law could configure it without your help.

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post #51 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kolchak View Post

Having never owned an Airport router of any kind, I have to ask those with experience: Are there really any functional advantages to Apple's routers (like ease of setup) that justify the much higher prices?


No.

Routers are complex, you have to know what your doing beforehand or else have issues later on.

Airport or Apple can't simplify the process, so it's no use paying more if it doesn't deliver.
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post #52 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

No.

It's been my experience working with Airport/Airport software that's it's more trouble and less reliable. Something about it being updated through Software Update just screws up it's world.

I used a off the shelf router, it came with step by step instructions and once I updated the firmware and hardened it, it hasn't given me a lick of trouble for years now.

This has not been my experience
The software is easy to use and has not missed a beat and the Software updates have worked flawlessly. I suppose this just goes to the old " your mileage may vary " adage.
post #53 of 212
Apple just doesn't get it with this product. The reason is that they are used to telling consumers what they want but in the case of this product, that is not going to work.

Consumers are telling Apple they want a DVR and TV tuner and web access. Apple has not listened, therefore the product will be nothing but a niche.

As long as I get to view programs on Hulu.com, I'm not going to pay .99 per episode.
post #54 of 212
Airports would sell better if they included just a single LAN port. Not every computer has wireless. The Mac Pro, for example and a lot of other desktops, especially older ones.
post #55 of 212
The Apple Airport Extreme router is not suitable to the UK market at all.

The majority of all broadband UK residents have PPPoA ADSL. The UK market is completely dominated by Wireless Modem/Router boxes. Every manufacturer makes them (with the exception of Apple) and it is hard to buy a stand-alone modem - or stand alone router.

To make use of the Apple router - consumers need to find a modem - which can do PPPoA to PPPoE conversion. There is only one such product that I know of (The Draytek Vigor 120) and that costs as much as a standalone modem/router.

Whoever called this a fanboy product is right.

(of course, I have one)

C.
post #56 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Disabling SSID broadcasts is like dummy-locking your tool shed, it seems to be more secure but won't deter the guy who you are trying to keep out in the first place. Anyone with half a clue would be able to pick out your SSID from the airwaves using freely available software. Likewise, anyone can spoof a MAC address (most routers even have this built-in to fool early attempts by ISPs to needlessly sell additional IP addresses) . If the appearance of these type of "security features" keeps someone from encrypting their router traffic with WPA2, then it's actually counterproductive to securing their home or small business networks.

I think the best feature in the newer AEB is the guest network, which segregates a publicly available network (depending on configuration) from the secured, internal network. OBTW, configuration of this is ridiculously easy using the built-in Airport software. Your mother-in-law could configure it without your help.

that's all true but the simplest part of security is to reduce the attack surface area and make it as hard as possible

most of the big security headaches of the last few years have been because people don't follow the simple rules and instead believe the high tech ones will keep them safe. i even go as far as limiting the number of DHCP addresses my router will assign to the number of devices in my home

it's not even about the hacker in the street, you can have a kiddie porn surfing neighbor or someone may decide to share their music/movie collection via your wifi and invite a RIAA lawsuit. keeping your wifi to yourself may prevent legal headaches
post #57 of 212
Apple TV is a bit long on needing a vibrant upgrade. in my belief it needs

1- Larger hard drive 500gb+ option, also ability to add extra storage externally via USB, Firewire or ESata.
2- upgrade 1080p programming to hdtv
3- Open up the Apple TV - allow third party programs and developers, allow Netflix, Amazon, Blockbuster, Vudu and others to stream/download content to the device.

4- Apple TV app store- have it be able to be used for alot more. let developers create games, apps and so much more for

5- Videoconferencing - add ability for people to add a cam, hell apple could make a cam. so people can do video calls not just on their computer. but allow it to be used not only with ichat/aol chats, ie Skype app to use it. and who knows. other corporate ways. let Cisco create a app to use on it.
6- Blu-Ray - it is long overdue for apple to support Blu-Ray properly. to be a proper computer company it can't block technology which "competes" with itunes. Mac OS X must be open, as should all of Apple's products. sad to see things end up being more closed and well restricted to what Apple approves only.

7- Bluetooth - have the ability to add alot of extra add on's via this great tech. from headsets, to keyboards and gaming controllers
8- USB port fully functional - if you can add a camera, and external mic and more... why stop there... allow companies to add all sorts of extra devices and be able to build out a properly functional media center / computer apple tv.
9- full internet capability - yes, all my thoughts about making Apple tv capable require full internet capabilities and the ability for it to do oh so much more.

I would be alot happier if i could use my apple tv as a place for all the blu-Ray digital copies i have or maybe even a place to store movies i buy from apple itunes movie store. but do NOT want to keep on my laptop because it would take up too much room in my laptop. or even desktop.

Anyway, it would be awesome to really make more of this device as a proper home media center and computing entertainment center.
post #58 of 212
Totally forgot there was a router share!
post #59 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Apple just doesn't get it with this product. The reason is that they are used to telling consumers what they want but in the case of this product, that is not going to work.

Consumers are telling Apple they want a DVR and TV tuner and web access. Apple has not listened, therefore the product will be nothing but a niche.

As long as I get to view programs on Hulu.com, I'm not going to pay .99 per episode.

i agree on opening up the device for full internet abiliy.

but Hulu... won't be free for too much longer.
post #60 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchelljd View Post

Apple TV is a bit long on needing a vibrant upgrade. in my belief it needs

1- Larger hard drive 500gb+ option, also ability to add extra storage externally via USB, Firewire or ESata.
2- upgrade 1080p programming to hdtv
3- Open up the Apple TV - allow third party programs and developers, allow Netflix, Amazon, Blockbuster, Vudu and others to stream/download content to the device.

4- Apple TV app store- have it be able to be used for alot more. let developers create games, apps and so much more for

5- Videoconferencing - add ability for people to add a cam, hell apple could make a cam. so people can do video calls not just on their computer. but allow it to be used not only with ichat/aol chats, ie Skype app to use it. and who knows. other corporate ways. let Cisco create a app to use on it.
6- Blu-Ray - it is long overdue for apple to support Blu-Ray properly. to be a proper computer company it can't block technology which "competes" with itunes. Mac OS X must be open, as should all of Apple's products. sad to see things end up being more closed and well restricted to what Apple approves only.

7- Bluetooth - have the ability to add alot of extra add on's via this great tech. from headsets, to keyboards and gaming controllers
8- USB port fully functional - if you can add a camera, and external mic and more... why stop there... allow companies to add all sorts of extra devices and be able to build out a properly functional media center / computer apple tv.

I would be alot happier if i could use my apple tv as a place for all the blu-Ray digital copies i have or maybe even a place to store movies i buy from apple itunes movie store. but do NOT want to keep on my laptop because it would take up too much room in my laptop. or even desktop.

Anyway, it would be awesome to really make more of this device as a proper home media center and computing entertainment center.

I definietly agree, those are all very good ideas. I'd add to that the ability to read email and use a web browser. The easiest & quickest way to do all that would be to just add screen sharing back to your mac.
But most of all it needs a DVR function or it is a dead end product!
post #61 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Although Time Machine backups don't give you a directly bootable solution, you can combine an OSX reinstall with a TM restore.

That's true, but depending solely upon Time Machine you have more points of potential failure from getting back to a working machine right away.

Dead boot drive, dead Superdrive or dead OS X install disk or necessary drivers for video cards (MacPro) that are not on the OS X install disk, so the machine won't boot a screen without reinstalling the factory equipment.


Quote:
The other use for Time Machine backup is the pseudo-point-in-time recoverability for those who may not know which version of a file they need to revert to or exactly when a file was deleted. This is more along the lines of archival recovery for inadvertent data loss and is a different problem from a catastrophic failure.

Did people forget to "Save As" all of a sudden?

Quote:
For those who don't care to be bothered about backups or recovery (and recovery is the real issue), Time Machine backups provide a pretty good integrated solution for most people, and does a pretty reasonable job of tackling both recover-ability scenarios. Certainly better than is otherwise accessible to the masses.

I agree it's better than nothing and for most, a waste of a perfectly good hard drive when one can't boot from it.
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post #62 of 212
ATV is frustrating. More than anything it needs external storage and the ability to stream from websites and/or Netflix/Hulu.

I gave up a few months ago on mine and bought a Mac Mini. Much more expensive, but 100 times more versatile... now if only the Mini had HDMI Audio out... quite honestly it's almost as though Apple is deliberately trying to stop you from using their products as media centers.

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post #63 of 212
I agree that Apple TV is definitely a niche product and the AirPort routers have made limited penetration into the router market. However, as someone in that niche, I must say that I am quite happy with my Apple TV and the performance of my AirPort Extreme router. I want more from the Apple TV, though; I don't think that it's anywhere close to reaching its potential. I really don't think that Apple is done with developing Apple TV. I can't imagine Apple not wanting a privileged position in living rooms and basements. I think that the potential revenue is considerable and Apple is well placed to exploit it, before other companies grab brand loyalty.

I really don't think that DVR functionality is likely, because of its likely impact on Apple's business model around iTunes. However, I can imagine new Apple TVs with 1 or 2 TB hard drives, more powerful processors, an improved UI, and the ability to function as a home media center for all types of media. Another future selling point would be even better integration with all of the other products in the Apple "ecosystem", including any future tablet device. Apple products are never cheap, so these changes will not make Apple TV a ubiquitous part of households, but it could mean that the niche will increase considerably.
post #64 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

ATV is frustrating. More than anything it needs external storage and the ability to stream from websites and/or Netflix/Hulu.

I gave up a few months ago on mine and bought a Mac Mini. Much more expensive, but 100 times more versatile... now if only the Mini had HDMI Audio out... quite honestly it's almost as though Apple is deliberately trying to stop you from using their products as media centers.

I believe HDMI requires a license and adherence to certain requirements for HDCP as the machines hooked up with HDMI talk to and validate each other and their compliance.

The closed system is clearly designed to keep HDMI content OFF computers so the content can't easily be copied.
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post #65 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

Appel TV is useful in countries where you can rent or buy movies and tv shows but in countries like Spain where you can't it's almost useless.

I wouldn't call the the movie rentals exactly useful. They are very expensive for a 24hr rental.
post #66 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by lo_fye View Post

Today, the Apple TV wants your content to be Apple-Approved content.
If they want sales of Apple TV to skyrocket, they need to make it play anything.
It should play Xvid & DivX right out of the box.
It should have every codec known to man.
OR it should allow you to purchase & install codecs as apps.
Video doesn't play? Press ok to purchase the correct codec & auto-install it for $0.99

If it could play anything, from anywhere (NAS, external HDD, etc), including 1080p content, sales would BOOM.

The lack of format support is normally why I don't go for these type of Apple products. The WD TV Live box is much better value IMO:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzcvQqP0buk&feature=fvw

It supports a lot of formats and even streams movies over a network. The remote is compact and the UI is very nice. Simply pick up a 500GB 2.5" bus-powered drive and it's a cheap way to have instant access to all your media.

If the ATV did have a motion wand so you could use Safari and supported 3rd party codecs and bumped up the size to 500GB, it would be good value at the price its at. But it has none of those things.
post #67 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

ATV is frustrating. More than anything it needs external storage and the ability to stream from websites and/or Netflix/Hulu.

I gave up a few months ago on mine and bought a Mac Mini. Much more expensive, but 100 times more versatile... now if only the Mini had HDMI Audio out... quite honestly it's almost as though Apple is deliberately trying to stop you from using their products as media centers.

As frustrating as it is, the only way (IMO) to get a netflix-like experience on the ATV would be for the iTunes store to compete directly and have a subscription service for the ATV only. Netflix and Amazon, Hulu and others, are direct competitors and Apple would probably not allow them to happen. It's probably why they didn't already put a web browser in the ATV OS already.

Why would you buy or rent movies from iTunes if the ATV has a full web browser so you could go to Netflix, amazon, or hulu and watch a movie or TV show for free? It is frustrating, but Apple kind of shot themselves in the foot here. you can't have a web-browser if you're trying to get people to buy into the iTunes store platform...so they really trapped themselves here.

I would love to see the iPHone OS on the ATV but it's probably not going to happen, unless they have a solution to prevent thier customer base from just using the OS to go to Hulu. Sucks right?
post #68 of 212
the title for the article was one of the more non-sequiter I've seen in a looooong time. Come on guys. You can do better.
post #69 of 212
Apple's main reason for flat Airport sales is lack of followthrough. I've converted 3 of my Customers to the new Dual Band Airport Extremes because of the dual band capablity, the ability to manage via my MobileMe account, and primarily the guest network feature. Well the guest network is the biggest disappointment. The big use for my customers was to have a guest network visitors could access while visiting without being able to see the personal net and it's associated hardware, while at the pool or patio or in the gym in the case of a local church. Guess what the guest net is not extendable only your primary personal network. Suggestions were made when this was first discovered just after introduction and the Airport Extreme has received two firmware updates but with no changes to guest networking. So if Apple wants to increase share it must do as with all it successful products keep making improvements and enhancements ie iPhone, iMac, and MacBooks. So the fault lies clearly with Apple.
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post #70 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

ATV is frustrating. More than anything it needs external storage and the ability to stream from websites and/or Netflix/Hulu.

I gave up a few months ago on mine and bought a Mac Mini. Much more expensive, but 100 times more versatile... now if only the Mini had HDMI Audio out... quite honestly it's almost as though Apple is deliberately trying to stop you from using their products as media centers.


The Mac Mini solution makes a lot of sense too, especially if they could make a reduced price version as a media center.
It still needs a DVR, but it seems like that could be done by just adding another application to iLife.

I'm not too worried about the HDMI issues. That is an annoying, dead-end technology that should never have been brought to market and will hopefully disappear soon. FW3200 would have been a fine solution (recall that the HDTV standard was originally supposed to use FW as the main connection technology until the Hollyweird creeps objected because it is too consumer friendly).
That window may have passed, but Light Peak looks very promising on the horizon. Infinitely superior to HDMI.
post #71 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Absolutely. Airport routers have a far more intuitive setup and configuration than anything I've ever seen on the PC market. The problems are:

1) Apple don't seem to do a very good job of promoting this ease of use compared to others

I agree, it's more complicated because of Airport Software and updates. Also it's not easy to simplify because everyone's network is different.

But one thing Apple should do is make a default hardened set up.

Quote:
2) Many consumers are cheapskates and are hard-pressed to pay extra for elegant design and ease of use

There isn't much ease of use with Airport, to properly set up a router you got to know what your doing anyway, so you can buy the less expensive ones.

Quote:
3) Wifi networks are often installed by "the cable guy" or some other "PC guy", who are unlikely to recommend an Apple product.

Exactly, because most new Apple users are network illiterate or get the internet as a afterthought. If the PC guy installs it, they have a choice of vendors and prices. Products are available locally and Apple's prices are high.
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post #72 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

I believe HDMI requires a license and adherence to certain requirements for HDCP as the machines hooked up with HDMI talk to and validate each other and their compliance.

The closed system is clearly designed to keep HDMI content OFF computers so the content can't easily be copied.

This does not make much sense though, as the Apple TV does have component outputs (which are analog and provide full resolution). So, it is actually even easier to copy from the Apple TV than from any current Mac (as the Mini DisplayPort output does no longer support composite/S-Video signals).

Allowing HDMI video without audio is not explained by HDCP licensing issues - the signal is HDCP compliant (e.g.: you can use an external BD player and a BD playback software under Windows and it does work on every current Mac), so they could also add audio. Even DisplayPort is fully capable of supporting 8 simultaneous digital audio signals, but Apple does not use it and there is really no valid explanation for it.
post #73 of 212
I see quite a few people here saying that adding a DVR to AppleTV will cause sales to sky rocket. If that were true, EVERYONE would have TiVo and sadly, not a lot more people do. It is easily the best DVR out there. I don't work for TiVo but have two units at home and access friends and relatives that love Microsoft (I live in the Seattle area) and won't buy Apple stuff (though it isn't beneath them to have me fix their videos for them).

Too many cable boxes come with (low end) DVRs that are "good enough" for people. That with cable on-demand and NetFlix and people just don't see spending money for TiVo or what I would prefer, AppleTV/TiVo combined into one box. That isn't going to happen but that would be the start of heaven.

As for DVD players. For me these are like record players. As soon as people could load music from CDs onto computers and then onto iPods they did. Apple should be following this idea with AppleTV where you can easily import all of your DVDs into iTunes on your computer and have it play on the TV.

The closest I can get to this so far is my Mac Mini with Hardbrake and Front Row. And this is actually what I do. AppleTV is a HUGE step backwards from a Mac Mini except that you can't download a lot of HD movies from iTunes. Quite a few you Have to have an ATV to do this. And right now it is way too expensive to buy an external BlueRay drive and connect it to a Mac. Assuming one is available.

Optical audio - My sound system for my TV (3rd party separate sound system) only has one port for optical audio. So how does Apple and other companies expect me to get full 5.1 Surround Sound when I can only connect one device at a time? Right now no device does everything I want which means multiple devices are required and we are back to stupidly having to manually switch things around. I'm SOOOOO tired of this.

What would I like? A Mac Mini type device with TiVo (not some lame low end DVR) with connections for cable/satellite and slot loading DVD/BlueRay drive that sucks in movies just like songs are sucked into iTunes. I want to be able to pick movies from a menu just like I pick songs. Right now iTunes doesn't do this (suck in movies and no BlueRay) and FrontRow is stripped down AppleTV and AppleTV doesn't have slot load and and a PS3 (no M$ products in my house and they suck anyway) has no iTunes and won't suck in movies onto it's hard hard drive.

Note that TiVo does have Netflix and Amazon and so forth where you can buy stuff from them. I haven't yet though.
post #74 of 212
Just give me more than 3 usable ports in the back. One of the 4 is used to plug in the cable modem's signal, only leaving me three to mess with. At least they are covered by any apple protection plan you have that is tied to a computer.
post #75 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

I wouldn't call the the movie rentals exactly useful. They are very expensive for a 24hr rental.

Really depends on where you are... Over here they are identically priced to video-on-demand offers by the cable company (which you have to watch immediately in one go and can't even pause). Going to the local video shop costs me more money for gas and parking fees than an iTunes rental and I can't even be sure the movie I want is available. The whole process of going there, parking, renting, getting back is at least one hour. It is just more convenient to click "rent" on the Apple TV - I can watch any 720p movie within less than two minutes.
post #76 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

So what's stopping anyone form importing their DVD's? I have 2 TB's of movies almost all of which is from my DVD collection. Get a copy of hanbrake and be done with it.

Actually, you won't be done with it, you will just be starting. Handbrake is very time consuming, takes up lots of space after a while and the picture quality is not that good. The picture on my upscaled DVD player is much better. AppleTV does pictures well so that is what I mostly use mine for.
post #77 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

Actually, you won't be done with it, you will just be starting. Handbrake is very time consuming, takes up lots of space after a while and the picture quality is not that good. The picture on my upscaled DVD player is much better. AppleTV does pictures well so that is what I mostly use mine for.

You are out of date on HandBrake. I can see now loss of picture quality since the newest version of HandBrake.

As for disk space. Duh. But that disk space is going to be taken no matter which way you get the movie onto your hard drive (or the AppleTV hard drive). Movies take space. We accept that.
post #78 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post

I think you'd be surprised. I think a fair number of people are already doing it with iPods, and I think we'll see it skyrocket once the tablet ships.

Oh, and forgot to mention before, I'd totally buy a decent TV streaming box to use with my current SDTV. No plans to replace it before it dies, even if that's years from now.



Is that right?

No. It's incorrect.
post #79 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorotea View Post

Not everyone wants to stream. 16gb is way way way too small.

Different price points for different needs/features.
post #80 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchelljd View Post

Apple TV is a bit long on needing a vibrant upgrade. in my belief it needs

1- Larger hard drive 500gb+ option, also ability to add extra storage externally via USB, Firewire or ESata...
[

Why not allow it to stream directly from your Apple home server? I have over 500gb of iTunes purchased movies and tv shows on our Apple home server. I hate having to select the movies and tv shows I want on each Apple TV in the house. Worst part is I have to go to the Server to make these selections.

Seems like a basic feature that is missing.
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