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Apple tablet may ship with multi-touch version of iWork - Page 4

post #121 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelcruncher View Post

More than ever, I hope Apple allows the tablet to be used with an external keyboard, something they have refused to allow with the iPhone.

I think you want a laptop. You can guy one.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #122 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifterus View Post

Can somebody please explain the logic behind the hype of this device and why it won't end up like the Newton?

- It's too big to carry in your pocket. That's what the iPhone is for.

- Presumably far too weak for power computing (Photoshop, etc.). That's what a desktop or Macbook is for.

- Presumably a lot more expensive than the $200 "Netbooks" available.
...

I bolded out the flaw in your argument. Netbooks are a form factor, not a price category.

The Apple tablet is purported to be a "netbook replacement" from a functional/design standpoint. The fact that it may or may not be a certain price is irrelevant.

In any case, there are no netbooks of any worth for $200. Most netbooks start at $400 (realistically), and the only good ones are more like $600-$800. The tablet is likely to be in the top end of the Netbook price range, but still in the same range.
post #123 of 173
Quote:
I'm relatively certain that whatever gesture vocabulary they've dreamed up will feel very natural and obvious, once you've used it. Which is why I'm also pretty certain the "three finger down" thing is just made up.

Like to think so, but the last shuffle makes me nervous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelcruncher View Post

I'm not sure what Apple has in store but the idea that any of the regular buying public wants to learn multi-touch gestures is out of line with how much they use the existing multitouch gestures. I would bet 99% of casual Mac buyers don't even know more than a couple gestures or that many of their apps have differing multi-touch gestures of their own.

There's also the very serious consideration that Mac devices don't always register touches correctly. That would be incredibly frustrating for working in an office app suite where speed and precision would be valued.

Then again, this is all rumor. Apple doesn't even think the average user is capable of dealing with folders on their iPhones, much less learning a set of "complex" multi-touch gestures that may differ between apps. In the end the device will be judged by Apple's core fans on its forward thinking, but by the rest of the public on how easy it is to operate vs their laptops. If this is supposed to be a productivity device with office programs like iWork, then it stands to reason that it will need to be able to compete with the devices that offer the same functionality. More than ever, I hope Apple allows the tablet to be used with an external keyboard, something they have refused to allow with the iPhone.

1. CES saw a keyboard you can just plug a Touch and/or an iPhone into.
2. Most of my MB Pro using friends do not in fact really know or use any of the gestures except maybe two finger scrolling.
3. I've been computing for 25 years and since I reboot infrequently when my old iPod click wheel freezes, can never remember which two buttons I'm supposed to press (and actually recently learned online you're supposed to push the hold switch on and off before whatever the keypress is).

So I repeat that multiple memorized gestures are not going to be the next great thing. Mice took some adaptation, sure, but you saw something moving on the screen as your hand moved and you could see your destination. With umpteen gestures doing multiple things most of which are NOT screen targets you're in another universe entirely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I've been an enthusiastic user of computers since almost the day they first became available and in all that time, the one thing a computer has never been able to successfully replace is that simple thing you do when you pull out a pen and a piece of paper, or draw on the back of a napkin in a restaurant. It's one of the most natural human communication activities but it simply can't be done on a computer. The closest I ever got was a series of Palm and PocketPC devices with styluses but there were innumerable problems ...

I don't want to see a stylus, but if there isn't some kind of solution in the tablet for simple drawing, then it will not be up to spec as far as I can see.

Sure, you'll be able to draw with your finger, and sure the bigger screen will make that even easier, but anyone who uses a pen seriously can tell you that a finger is not a pen and never will be. It's pretty obvious that pens and writing devices wouldn't have been invented at all, if fingers would suffice. The pen is probably the biggest single invention of all time and there is yet no handy, universal, natural, computerised replacement for it. If a tablet is going to replace pads of paper, it has to have some kind of pen or pen-like input.

The tablet either has to have a stylus (the easy solution), or it has to have some completely unknown, totally new way of making your fingers mimic a pen in software. If it doesn't, then it's only really solved the problem of keyboard entry, not stylus entry.

The stylus preceded the pen - likely by a few hundred thousand years when the first man used a long stick to draw in the sand without getting down on the ground, or found s/he could do more complicated output with a sharpened point.

On the other hand, cave paintings show that "ink" has been around for tens of thousands of years, although many ancient cultures opted for inscribing with chisel-like "pens" (much more stylus than pen) in clay tablets, stone, wood (runes, e.g.).

dipping a writing instrument like a quill in ink was the next great innovation - along with paint brushes and other tools for slathering liquid media on solid surfaces, and the fountain pen, carrying its own ink supply was likely the revolutionary output device sensation of its relatively recent era (I hear people lined up outside pen shops for days to be among the early adopters ), holding its own until supplanted by the ballpoint, sharpies, etc.

but meanwhile, mechanical personal typemaking devices - from typewriters to linotype to word processors to PC's took over writing, and cameras and then cameras coupled with software supplanted virtual image-making for the average person - and these technologies currently dominate.

charting the arc of that progress, virtual keyboards and knowing that you mean to make a precise fine line with a finger on a touch screen sometimes and a thick one with another nuance while having carefully learned sets of gestures to control the project at hand cut against that grain and seem a tall order for a tech bent on writing the next chapter in how humans create writing and images.

surprise me, Apple! Please......

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #124 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Building up my war-chest for the purchase.....

Lord, can you imagine the lines around the block at all the stores this product is going to generate on day 1? It's going to make the iphone launch seem like lunch time at McDonalds.
post #125 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Like to think so, but the last shuffle makes me nervous.

I see what you mean, but I doubt the Shuffle is a harbinger of a tablet UI.

......

Quote:
The stylus preceded the pen - likely by a few hundred thousand years when the first man used a long stick to draw in the sand without getting down on the ground, or found s/he could do more complicated output with a sharpened point.

On the other hand, cave paintings show that "ink" has been around for tens of thousands of years, although many ancient cultures opted for inscribing with chisel-like "pens" (much more stylus than pen) in clay tablets, stone, wood (runes, e.g.).

dipping a writing instrument like a quill in ink was the next great innovation - along with paint brushes and other tools for slathering liquid media on solid surfaces, and the fountain pen, carrying its own ink supply was likely the revolutionary output device sensation of its relatively recent era (I hear people lined up outside pen shops for days to be among the early adopters ), holding its own until supplanted by the ballpoint, sharpies, etc.

but meanwhile, mechanical personal typemaking devices - from typewriters to linotype to word processors to PC's took over writing, and cameras and then cameras coupled with software supplanted virtual image-making for the average person - and these technologies currently dominate.

charting the arc of that progress, virtual keyboards and knowing that you mean to make a precise fine line with a finger on a touch screen sometimes and a thick one with another nuance while having carefully learned sets of gestures to control the project at hand cut against that grain and seem a tall order for a tech bent on writing the next chapter in how humans create writing and images.

surprise me, Apple! Please......

A very well thought out post. I would just add that if human beings had evolved with the ability to exude pigment through their finger tips, the history of writing implements would have been much different.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #126 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

... The stylus preceded the pen - likely by a few hundred thousand years when the first man used a long stick to draw in the sand without getting down on the ground, or found s/he could do more complicated output with a sharpened point.

On the other hand, cave paintings show that "ink" has been around for tens of thousands of years, although many ancient cultures opted for inscribing with chisel-like "pens" (much more stylus than pen) in clay tablets, stone, wood (runes, e.g.).

dipping a writing instrument like a quill in ink was the next great innovation - along with paint brushes and other tools for slathering liquid media on solid surfaces, and the fountain pen, carrying its own ink supply was likely the revolutionary output device sensation of its relatively recent era (I hear people lined up outside pen shops for days to be among the early adopters ), holding its own until supplanted by the ballpoint, sharpies, etc. .....

I think we are basically in agreement, but I should point out that when I was using the word "pen," I was using it as a sort of shorthand to cover this whole category. So styluses, using ink or clay, quills etc. were all intended to be covered by that term in my post.

What I was trying to get across is that moment of human communication when a bunch of folks are all pushing a piece of paper back and forth and expressing ideas on it has yet to be efficiently or usefully replaced using computers, especially *mobile* computers.

Some ideas can only be expressed, or even thought in the first place, by drawing.
post #127 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Which reminds me of the oft cited Jobs quote from '96, shortly before he retook the reigns at Apple: "If I were running Apple, I would milk the Macintosh for all it's worth -- and get busy on the next great thing. The PC wars are over. Done. Microsoft won a long time ago."

Given that it's been widely reported that the iPhone was actually the first, somewhat pared down version of a tablet project that had been in the works for perhaps the last 10 years, you have to wonder if Apple isn't intent on simply changing the conversation away from the desktop market they can never dominate and over to a whole new paradigm. I don't think it's too much of a stretch to imagine that Apple (Jobs) sees their idea of a touch based computer as the new Mac compared to extent PCs-- even Apple's own PCs.

Good call, I hadn't thought about that quote for quite awhile, but I remember how much it freaked people out at the time. Of course it always pays not to take The Steve totally literally, but based on the last ten years of evidence I'd say it's pretty clear that he has been taking Apple in "next great thing" directions instead of trying to refight old battles.
Please don't be insane.
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post #128 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Good call, I hadn't thought about that quote for quite awhile, but I remember how much it freaked people out at the time. Of course it always pays not to take The Steve totally literally, but based on the last ten years of evidence I'd say it's pretty clear that he has been taking Apple in "next great thing" directions instead of trying to refight old battles.

And you can bet that this time, should a new tablet gestural device prove successful, they're not going to be making any deals with MS to license look and feel in exchange for any favors.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #129 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I think we are basically in agreement.
Some ideas can only be expressed, or even thought in the first place, by drawing.

Yup we are, but I'm one of those disadvantaged wordy nerds who "cain't draw worth a lick" - so I write a lot!!

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post #130 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Why is there this idea that Apple is simply going to take an already existing OS without any alterations for the completely different device. They tailored the AppleTV OS and iPhone OS UI and APIs for their respective devices so why should we expect anything less for an Apple tablet?

Where did I mention Apple will use an existing, unaltered OS for the tablet? I was just saying that between Mac OS and iPhone OS, Mac OS would take more advantage of the bigger screen and better hardware.

In fact, I believe Apple is making Tablet OS, even though its only difference from OS X may be the different interface to suit Multi-touch

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Early 2010 MacBook Pro 2.4GHz, soon to be replaced with a Retina MacBook Pro, or an Asus U500

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post #131 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeskymac View Post

Where did I mention Apple will use an existing, unaltered OS for the tablet? I was just saying that between Mac OS and iPhone OS, Mac OS would take more advantage of the bigger screen and better hardware.

In fact, I believe Apple is making Tablet OS, even though its only difference from OS X may be the different interface to suit Multi-touch

Yeah, but you could as easily say that the "only difference" between OS X and the iPhone OS is that the latter is tailored to suit a small screen device with constrained hardware, which is in fact the case.

It's clear that an Apple tablet will run something derived from OS X that matches its components to the hardware and has a UI that makes the most of the screen real estate. We can call it whatever we like, the fact is it that Apple is moving towards a continuum of OS iterations that all share the OS X code base and all are customized to the device at hand. Getting hung up on what's "real" OS X sort of misses the point, IMO.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #132 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And you can bet that this time, should a new tablet gestural device prove successful, they're not going to be making any deals with MS to license look and feel in exchange for any favors.

Well it wasn't exactly "look and feel" and they weren't exactly "favors," but I take your point anyway. Apple isn't indebted to anyone now. No more "mother may I" required.
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post #133 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

... It's clear that an Apple tablet will run something derived from OS X that matches its components to the hardware and has a UI that makes the most of the screen real estate. ...

I'm interested in exactly how they will change the GUI. The closer it gets, the more I think of how awful most iPhone apps are going to look when they are full-screen on a large tablet. I don't mean they will be fuzzy or pixelated, I just mean they will look hideous when blown up to that size.

Think of things like the Facebook app, or even the weather widget.

At more than double the size, they will have huge silly fonts, and blah backgrounds. It seems to me they will look pretty garish at best. Anyone looking at you using a tablet will assume that you are a senior citizen reading a large type book or something.

There is not likely going to be a "desktop" so all apps will run full-screen. Will they let us turn the tablet sideways and run two apps side by side, or will we have to run them full screen portrait mode despite the senior citizen embarrassment thing? Will the apps have two modes and look simpler on the iPhone while allow for more detail on the tablet? Will all apps eventually have two separate versions and will we have to buy each?

If there are apps like Pages and Numbers, how will the UI be handled? Will the inspector palette float over the top or appear when needed or be a sidebar? Will everything become a sidebar, toolbar or ribbon? Most of Apple's apps, including the iWork suite all rely on multiple windows. How will all this be interpreted on a tablet where everything will be full-screen?

These are the really interesting questions IMO, and we won't even have a clue until the tablet is unveiled. Very frustrating to wait.
post #134 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

There is not likely going to be a "desktop" so all apps will run full-screen.

How do you know this?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #135 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I bolded out the flaw in your argument. Netbooks are a form factor, not a price category.

The Apple tablet is purported to be a "netbook replacement" from a functional/design standpoint. The fact that it may or may not be a certain price is irrelevant.

In any case, there are no netbooks of any worth for $200. Most netbooks start at $400 (realistically), and the only good ones are more like $600-$800. The tablet is likely to be in the top end of the Netbook price range, but still in the same range.

They're both driven by the price and the form factor. They are interdependent.
post #136 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

I think I am still most curious how you would hold/interact with the device in an interactive way. There is a reason paprbacks are the size they are, but finding a way to make a 10" device ergonomic seem like quite a challenge. Putting it flat on a desk contorts your neck, holding it at the base places added strain on wrists since the center of gravity is higher...

It won't need to be held flat. The types of use that make sense for a tablet would be more akin to using a clipboard therefore the device would be held in the arm and you'd use the keyboard and such with one hand.

I also have to say, looking down on the device is actually more comfortable for me than looking at a screen on a semi-upright position like on a laptop. It requires less muscle work than looking at a laptop screen and therefore should be more comfortable. In theory it shouldn't be much more work than looking over a writing pad.
post #137 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I'm interested in exactly how they will change the GUI. The closer it gets, the more I think of how awful most iPhone apps are going to look when they are full-screen on a large tablet. I don't mean they will be fuzzy or pixelated, I just mean they will look hideous when blown up to that size.

Think of things like the Facebook app, or even the weather widget.

At more than double the size, they will have huge silly fonts, and blah backgrounds. It seems to me they will look pretty garish at best. Anyone looking at you using a tablet will assume that you are a senior citizen reading a large type book or something.

There is not likely going to be a "desktop" so all apps will run full-screen. Will they let us turn the tablet sideways and run two apps side by side, or will we have to run them full screen portrait mode despite the senior citizen embarrassment thing? Will the apps have two modes and look simpler on the iPhone while allow for more detail on the tablet? Will all apps eventually have two separate versions and will we have to buy each?

If there are apps like Pages and Numbers, how will the UI be handled? Will the inspector palette float over the top or appear when needed or be a sidebar? Will everything become a sidebar, toolbar or ribbon? Most of Apple's apps, including the iWork suite all rely on multiple windows. How will all this be interpreted on a tablet where everything will be full-screen?

These are the really interesting questions IMO, and we won't even have a clue until the tablet is unveiled. Very frustrating to wait.

In part I agree with you but for the rest I don't.

I don't agree that the font size will increase because Apple has resolution independence built into its OS but it does beg how the real estate will be governed.

Your comments about Numbers and Pages makes no sense because document editing has been proven very effective with apps like Documents to Go and QuickOffice. Having more real estate means there is the possibility to place more icons at the bottom of the screen but most importantly it will have more real estate for editing documents which is the key to document development.

It doesn't have to be flash like the desktop version it only has to be effective and a tablet running OS X will be effective for the job as opposed to an iPhone or iPod Touch running OS X.
post #138 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

I remind people that when the first Mac shipped with its mouse, the naysayers were extremely vocal.


However, the mouse remained relatively obscure until the appearance of the Apple Macintosh; in 1984 PC columnist John C. Dvorak ironically commented on the release of this new computer with a mouse: There is no evidence that people want to use these things.[2]
A mouse now comes with most computers and many other varieties can be bought separately.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_(computing)


A better version:

Dvorak's most famous prediction, coming in 1984 as a writer for the San Francisco Examiner, identified the Macintosh as a useless tool and the mouse as a 'new fangled' device he neither wanted nor needed. "The nature of the personal computer is simply not fully understood by companies like Apple (or anyone else for that matter). Apple makes the arrogant assumption of thinking that it knows what you want and need. It, unfortunately, leaves the why out of the equation - as in why would I want this? The Macintosh uses an experimental pointing device called a mouse. There is no evidence that people want to use these things. I dont want one of these new fangled devices."[7]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Dvorak#Controversy

Apple will do it right.

OK, so what are you proposing? Apple hires Dvorak as a consultant and does the opposite to whatever he proposes?

Philip Machanick creator of Opinionations and Green Grahamstown
Department of Computer Science, Rhodes University, South Africa

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post #139 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I think the rumor is interesting, but surely there's a better example of a potential gesture vocabulary than "three fingers down and rotate to open an application"?

I mean, how about touching an icon?

I was actually thinking the same as word "complex" got my attention.

I'm hoping for simple iPhone-like touch experience, just applied to more capable hardware (and software) than what is available for iPhone, but I'm definitely not looking forward at learning new sign language (if I decide to get tablet).

I think that iPhone interface can be fully applied to a laptop-class tablet. I really don't see how much more gestures would be required for running apps, scrolling through documents and folders...
post #140 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I think the rumor is interesting, but surely there's a better example of a potential gesture vocabulary than "three fingers down and rotate to open an application"?

I mean, how about touching an icon?

This has all the earmarks of a controlled leak. Sounds ridiculous.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #141 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

This has all the earmarks of a controlled leak. Sounds ridiculous.

Someone (I apologize for forgetting who) posted a link to some old Fingerworks documents. I noticed that one of them actually specified "three finger and rotate counterclockwise" for opening a file and clockwise for closing. The whole list includes some pretty arcane stuff, exactly the kind of "get ready for a steep learning curve" deal that has been mentioned.

My suspicion is someone took a look at the Fingerworks stuff and just decided that Apple was going to apply that wholesale. Which seems pretty unlikely to me.
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post #142 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

No surprise. Actually, Apple tried to use the Intel Atom first for the Apple Tablet. Why? Because they wanted a full Mac (touch) inside. Now they will go with ARM for TDP and battery advantages, but the full computer goal holds. WHICH IS FANTASTIC and will make the Apple Tablet a real HIT!!!

Yup yup yup. I have a feeling those PA Semi guys really cooked up something special for the tablet. It can't just be a big iPod Touch. What would be the point (besides the bigger screen) then for the tablet? Productivity on the go....easy, quick, agile productivity on the go. You can't achieve ease, speed and agility with a laptop especially pc based laptops. All a laptop is....is a portable desktop! Those HP slates from the Ballmer keynote might as well literally be laptops torn in half. Adding multi-touch (or rather Microsoft's version of it) to windows 7 without designing the OS GUI from the ground up to take advantage of multi-touch IS A WASTE!

Apple has designed something really special for us.

Star Trek PADDs are on the way folks!
post #143 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Someone (I apologize for forgetting who) posted a link to some old Fingerworks documents. I noticed that one of them actually specified "three finger and rotate counterclockwise" for opening a file and clockwise for closing. The whole list includes some pretty arcane stuff, exactly the kind of "get ready for a steep learning curve" deal that has been mentioned.

My suspicion is someone took a look at the Fingerworks stuff and just decided that Apple was going to apply that wholesale. Which seems pretty unlikely to me.

I laugh at you poor people. "get ready for a steep learning curve". Spare me the crying! I'm an owner of one of the original Fingerworks touchpads and I've been waiting PATIENTLY for Apple to implement the plethora of gestures possible with the multi-touch technology.

Learning curve? Please! I've BEEN prepared. So bring on the gestures!

Oh, and MACTOUCH FTW!!!!!11!!1! booyaaaaaaaaaaaa
post #144 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Your presumption is incorrect.

Actually, office productivity applications are far less taxing on computing resources compared to media applications.

Moving around massive amounts of data (e.g., AVCHD footage) is highly processor, graphics, memory and disk intensive. A word processor or spreadsheet app is positively lightweight compared to that.

The tablet's multitouch input, battery constraints, CPU performance, memory capacity, storage capacity, graphics performance, etc. all point to an inability to handle full blown media editing applications like Photoshop, Logic, or Final Cut. Basic media editing tools ("lite" version of iPhoto and iMovie) are possible, but if I tried to run Final Cut Express on a tablet, the battery would be sucked dry before the render was up.

Let's face it, the tablet is going to be a consumer device, not one for "prosumer" users. If you have a little Flip camcorder or are using your point-and-shoot camera's video mode, yeah, you might want some basic editing tools on your tablet before you upload to YouTube. If you are carrying around a full-blown AVCHD camcorder and want to edit your videos on semi-pro editors, you would be plugging your device into your notebook or desktop computer anyhow.

You are not gonna have 250GB of disk scratch space on this year's tablet. Ain't gonna happen.

Well the Flip is a raw content gathering device. How would a user get videos on the Mac Touch if there's no port on it.
Also I never posted about Photoshop, Final Cut, nor any other resource intensive program. I was curious about iLife. iWork includes Keynote and Pages which can import multimedia products. Yet if the Mac Touch lacks a USB how does a user get those products onto it? Using a computer defeats the purpose of a Mac Touch if the only way is through iTunes.
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post #145 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by icyfog View Post

How would a user get videos on the Mac Touch if there's no port on it. <snip> Using a computer defeats the purpose of a Mac Touch if the only way is through iTunes.
<snip> I was curious about iLife.

I too hope the tablet is up to some form of iMovie. When I think of what I use a computer for around the house, my imaginary tablet is really up to most of it (Note: it can't meet my work needs). The strengths are reading websites, forums, books wherever I'm sitting - my laptop can do it but it's less convenient. The weaknesses are typing in the forum - if I had something longer to type I'd ideally jump up with my tablet, sit at a table, and turn on a bluetooth keyboard. The other weakness would be iMovie, though I don't use that day-to-day.

But could a tablet handle the processing power needed for iMovie? The power required for iMovie drops if the files are reduced quality (the final product can still use the originals for export). And perhaps the GPU can really accomplish alot with far less heat? The tablet would seem to need either USB or Firewire to load, but Apple COULD just force users to get SD card movie cameras.

If we approach the tablet as a replacement to the computer then it has different port requirements. If I was betting - the tablet would have a USB port and SDcard slot, but I'm still borderline on the USB port. USB would allow an external disk for backups, connecting an iPod or iPhone, the MBA external DVD-drive, and connecting a printer or scanner. But Apple would rather we used Time machine for a backup, wireless syncing to other computers and iPhone(?), wireless printing, and do we even need a DVD drive...?
post #146 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsad23 View Post

The app store is apple's hidden treasure. Like the ipod touch and iphone, apple will sell the islate sans any apps and allow the user to fill up their shiny new purchase with all the $1, $5, $10 etc apps that they want.

I also feel that this will keep the price of the islate lower, but allow apple to keep the cash register ringing even after one purchases the device.

Ha ha. That would be a great interpretation of Steve Jobs's minimalism.

The slate would be completely black and when you hit the home button, a single App Store icon appears in the centre.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #147 of 173
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Originally Posted by Olternaut View Post

Star Trek PADDs are on the way folks!

Apple switching from Mac OS to LCARS?

Sounds good to me.
post #148 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Apple switching from Mac OS to LCARS?

Sounds good to me.

Hey, I betcha those Apple engineers could teach those 24th century federation engineers a thing or two.
post #149 of 173
I for one am very excited at these tablet possibilities, even if the product is non-existant at this point. I've always longed for a device with more advanced capabilities than the iPhone with a bigger screen, but the potential for full touch versions of popular computer apps would be icing on the cake. I guess I'll be holding off on that Macbook Air purchase, hopefully the 27th will shed more light on things
post #150 of 173
Apple needs to add more value to the Macintosh via the iPhone... for example:

I would like to launch Dashboard and click on a button that allows me to view whatever I'm viewing on my iPhone on my Mac's screen. I think this is a feature that will fatten the deal of switching to a Mac.

This is just an example, but seriously the point is made...
post #151 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilogic View Post

Apple needs to add more value to the Macintosh via the iPhone... for example:

I would like to launch Dashboard and click on a button that allows me to view whatever I'm viewing on my iPhone on my Mac's screen. I think this is a feature that will fatten the deal of switching to a Mac.

This is just an example, but seriously the point is made...

Good point. Remote viewing or operation of one's computer would be a nice built-in feature for iPhone/iPod touch, instead of leaving that to VNC apps.

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post #152 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Good point. Remote viewing or operation of one's computer would be a nice built-in feature for iPhone/iPod touch, instead of leaving that to VNC apps.

Can you VNC into the iPhone? VNCing into your PC from the iPhone makes sense but I see no need to do it the other way.
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post #153 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I'm interested in exactly how they will change the GUI. The closer it gets, the more I think of how awful most iPhone apps are going to look when they are full-screen on a large tablet. I don't mean they will be fuzzy or pixelated, I just mean they will look hideous when blown up to that size.

Think of things like the Facebook app, or even the weather widget.

At more than double the size, they will have huge silly fonts, and blah backgrounds. It seems to me they will look pretty garish at best. Anyone looking at you using a tablet will assume that you are a senior citizen reading a large type book or something.

There is not likely going to be a "desktop" so all apps will run full-screen. Will they let us turn the tablet sideways and run two apps side by side, or will we have to run them full screen portrait mode despite the senior citizen embarrassment thing? Will the apps have two modes and look simpler on the iPhone while allow for more detail on the tablet? Will all apps eventually have two separate versions and will we have to buy each?

If there are apps like Pages and Numbers, how will the UI be handled? Will the inspector palette float over the top or appear when needed or be a sidebar? Will everything become a sidebar, toolbar or ribbon? Most of Apple's apps, including the iWork suite all rely on multiple windows. How will all this be interpreted on a tablet where everything will be full-screen?

These are the really interesting questions IMO, and we won't even have a clue until the tablet is unveiled. Very frustrating to wait.

As long as we're continuing to feed the fantasy factory... I'd guess that a stylus may be either required or simply preferred for a tablet. Pecking at a screen with one hand, while balancing a sheet sized tablet makes little sense and would result in people dropping these things. Interaction may also focus on innovative use of the accelerometer, face & voice recognition... who really knows? I have strong doubts as to the reality of a tablet, and I'll believe it when I see it.

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post #154 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Can you VNC into the iPhone? VNCing into your PC from the iPhone makes sense but I see no need to do it the other way.

Not in any way I'm aware of... VNC from the iPod or iPhone can actually be useful sometimes. It's touchy, but it works.

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post #155 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Someone (I apologize for forgetting who) posted a link to some old Fingerworks documents. I noticed that one of them actually specified "three finger and rotate counterclockwise" for opening a file and clockwise for closing. The whole list includes some pretty arcane stuff, exactly the kind of "get ready for a steep learning curve" deal that has been mentioned.

My suspicion is someone took a look at the Fingerworks stuff and just decided that Apple was going to apply that wholesale. Which seems pretty unlikely to me.

Im not so sure its arcane. On a touchscreen with a visual display under our fingers, then yes, its arcane, but looking at the stuff Fingerworks had produced the multi-touch was a panel with no visual feedback. If a large touchscreen is on the back of the tablet then these odd gestures may be the best method for complex input.

Perhaps some learning will be involved, but the mouse once took some learning and came with an instruction manual from Apple. I figure the front will be still be multi-touch but having a touch sensitive back could be very useful, too. At this point I dont see a better option for a 10 tablet.
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post #156 of 173
I don't think the learning curve is that steep really. How long did it take you to learn to swipe, pinch, scroll... etc. All very easy and intuitive. Someone compared it to the iPod shuffle with all it's click combos. Not the same at all. In that case... you have to recall a series of clicks. It's more like trying to remember a combination lock. Very annoying. Gestures are more like learning a new guitar chord. Not hard at all since it's one thing. It's a shape. Or what have you. Yes... you have to take a minute to learn it. But I don't think it's that hard. I don't think the learning curve will be bad at all. As long as the gestures are intuitive.
post #157 of 173
Heads up: fingerworks.com is gone.

Hmm...

 

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Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #158 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takeo View Post

I don't think the learning curve is that steep really. How long did it take you to learn to swipe, pinch, scroll... etc. All very easy and intuitive. Someone compared it to the iPod shuffle with all it's click combos. Not the same at all. In that case... you have to recall a series of clicks. It's more like trying to remember a combination lock. Very annoying. Gestures are more like learning a new guitar chord. Not hard at all since it's one thing. It's a shape. Or what have you. Yes... you have to take a minute to learn it. But I don't think it's that hard. I don't think the learning curve will be bad at all. As long as the gestures are intuitive.

There are the videos in System preferences for Mac touchpads. Those werent tough to learn.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Heads up: fingerworks.com is gone.

Hmm...

Makes me think many of the gestures are going to be used on the tablet, though on the back. You dont need those complex gestures on the front. Tap or double-tap is all that is needed open an app if you point at it, no need for 3 fingers and twist.
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