or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple tablet may ship with multi-touch version of iWork
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple tablet may ship with multi-touch version of iWork - Page 3

post #81 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

Why wouldn't this thing just come with iTunes? Most of us would agree that iTunes is in need of a rewrite so why not just start with a touch based version? To me this should be a device that an iPhone can sync to and not a device that has to constantly sync to your Mac.

Since over 60% of Macs purchased are laptops, it would mean that most Mac users would be syncing their 10" tablet to their 13"-15" Macbook/Pro. It would look very odd.

Maybe, but this seems like an accessory device not your main PC so Apple will have to tackle the confusing dual iTunes Libraries issue. Surelydevicewon't capacity won't be so large ad to be able to handle most people's iTunes Library. I put a fraction of min on my 32GB iPhone and I'm fine with that.

I do see a place for a iTunes-like app that is a cross-between the read-only libraries we find on iDevices and iTunes on PCs but I think it will still be slaved to our master library.

Just because I think it will be an accesory device like all the iDevices doesn't mean I think it will require being plugged into a PC to sync. This is a different device type that isn't pocketable and possibly will be used in a general area or general way or most people. Perhaps Apple will allow OTA content syncing with this device. What makes since on a tablet any neccessarily going to make sense for a PMP or phone, and vice versa.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #82 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Everything you wrote sounds like reasons for not making a iWork for Windows. Web access or get a Mac.

Care to explain?

Keep in mind, Apple will want to sell these tablets. They didn't create the iPhone or the iPod for the purpose of selling Macs, they created them for the purpose of selling iPhones and iPods. They have sold more Macs as a result because they put Apple products into the hands of more people, but not because either one of them required you to own a Mac.

Web access, quite possibly. But I think a web interface to productivity applications is not widely accepted yet, so if Apple goes that route, it better be far more developed than anything out there currently (including iWork.com in its current state), or it won't sell slates or Macs.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #83 of 173
I hope this tablet allows me to create and store files on it and sync the iPhone/iPod to it.

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply
post #84 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

Why wouldn't this thing just come with iTunes? Most of us would agree that iTunes is in need of a rewrite so why not just start with a touch based version? To me this should be a device that an iPhone can sync to and not a device that has to constantly sync to your Mac.

Based on the word that Apple has asked a number of developers to update their apps to the larger screen on the iSlate, it would appear that iTunes will be an integral part of the new device.

Undoubtedly, all the current iPhone apps could be capable of running on the new iSlate.

Right now, I can sync text and images from my iPhone to my Mac and vice-versa via Pastebot/Pastebot Sync*.

In fact, I have been using Dragon Dictation on my iPhone and sending the voice-to-text files via mail, text messaging and Pastebot/Pastebot Sync.

Both programs are limited now by not being able to run apps in the background, but that should change pretty soon. In addition, Pastebot only syncs via Wi-Fi for now.

Point is, I think that 'syncing' will be an integral feature with the new iSlate and far beyond what we see with the current crop of apps/utilities. That and MobileMe and Apple's billion dollar server 'cloud computing' farm.

Note that Dragon Dictation† (and Dragon Search**) works exceptionally well, (particularly on my TomTom car kit). They are free. Unfortunately, They are only available on the US Store.

*http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews...oard-items.ars
http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...-on-iphone.ars
**http://www.tuaw.com/2009/12/17/drago...tore-for-free/
post #85 of 173
The one notion that I am willing to promulgate through my thinking on this device is that Steve Jobs is only interested in changing (or perhaps - revolutionising) the game. If what is announced later this month is not in Steve's mind revolutionary, then Apple will be releasing a new iPhone/iPod/Mac. Most here have probably read John Gruber's take on this;

http://daringfireball.net/2009/12/the_tablet

Steve has confronted his own mortality and is perhaps about to leave with us (not leave us hopefully), the legacy of his considerable insight and knowledge, his take on the future of computing within the context of current hardware and software capabilities. This thread is about the possibility of iWork on the slate. Perhaps though, this is just a beginning. An application that I use (every day when I'm not slacking off), is Mathematica, an application that can be quite demanding. However, it is also quite extensible. Imagine a front end running on the slate with the compute engine running on my MBP or Mac Pro or how about, my Dell tower (I didn't buy it myself - honest)! A 10" slate would be perfect for displaying the results of some computation as a table or graph or 3D animation.

http://wolfram.com/

Perhaps, in a board meeting, the parameters of some financial model could be changed and the results displayed and handed around on the slate, regardless of the operating system and hardware under which the model was run. All the time, less demanding applications could be run on board.

This approach would not diminish my current investment. Of course, application vendors would need to write handlers, basically I guess, remote windows communication over wi-fi. One could have Photoshop running on one system and OS, sending back 'shopped' images, Excel on another and so on. My current hardware might house my personal data cloud, or interact with the external cloud behind the scenes. However, before other vendors come on board, the slate would be a compelling computer in its own right, running iWork, iLife and a myriad applications available for the iPhone.

When setting up or programming some application, a large display is often necessary but for displaying the results, a high resolution, small display might be quite adequate.

For me, really the only question to ask, if in fact a new product line is about to be released, is which industry is Apple about to revolutionise? Perhaps the answer is personal computing! After all, Apple knows a thing or two about the subject!
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #86 of 173
I have a gesture for Apple, it involves a simple extension of your middle finger. If you are dumb enough to buy one of these, then you desrve to be relieved of your hard earned cash. Everyone is quick to judge failures by other companies products but give Apple a pass. They have done nothing right and I can give numerous examples of their failures and half baked ideas. This device is going to be no better. I'd rather try and hackintosh some of the really cool convertible hardware shown at CES if possible. Perhaps maybe that is why they are starting to clamp down on hackintoshing. But I expect to see huge lines forming for this device and people are going to kiss Apple's rear end. Buy the way I have been a Apple fan boy for 24 yrs. Just one more half baked product from a company that has become the leader in putting out half baked goods. The new big blue...Apple.
post #87 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALBIM View Post

These "complex multi-touch gestures" fits with the supposed steep learning curve rumor. Interesting...

I know Apple loves multi-touch, but it sounds like (three fingers and rotate instead of tapping) SJ is going a little crazy with it.

This certainly doesn't sound like "the UI for the rest of us." Apple lost me with the latest shuffle's umpteen click combos to control an impassive piece of aluminum that will only respond in any way if I stroke it with the right secret handshake.

Apple interfaces have always been about "it just works," as you can just look at it and figure out what to do next. "Complicated sets of multi-finger gestures" may appeal to a subset of power geeks, but for most, having to memorize commands we can't see is a step backwards to the days of memorizing DOS commands, now re-clothed as hand ballet movements. (a la "Minority Report" tho' on a 10" screen)

I'm sure there will be ways in which the (alleged) machine is elegantly approachable, but if this is at the heart of controlling complex apps with it, I'm having trouble seeing millions happily take the time to master the feng shui of 15 gesture multi-touch commands.

Apple seems too savvy to make this highly hyped and anticipated wonder into something unapproachable to the average target user, so this feature set may exist (and become second-nature to more and more people over years) but there indeed needs to be something that a computer naif can point at and get something done without specialized training.

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

Reply

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

Reply
post #88 of 173
..........
post #89 of 173
> If anyone can convince me I'm wrong, please do so. <

Couldn't be bothered; better just to wait and see.
post #90 of 173
I remind people that when the first Mac shipped with its mouse, the naysayers were extremely vocal.


However, the mouse remained relatively obscure until the appearance of the Apple Macintosh; in 1984 PC columnist John C. Dvorak ironically commented on the release of this new computer with a mouse: “There is no evidence that people want to use these things.”[2]
A mouse now comes with most computers and many other varieties can be bought separately.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_(computing)


A better version:

Dvorak's most famous prediction, coming in 1984 as a writer for the San Francisco Examiner, identified the Macintosh as a useless tool and the mouse as a 'new fangled' device he neither wanted nor needed. "The nature of the personal computer is simply not fully understood by companies like Apple (or anyone else for that matter). Apple makes the arrogant assumption of thinking that it knows what you want and need. It, unfortunately, leaves the “why” out of the equation - as in “why would I want this?” The Macintosh uses an experimental pointing device called a ‘mouse’. There is no evidence that people want to use these things. I dont want one of these new fangled devices."[7]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Dvorak#Controversy

Apple will do it right.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #91 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifterus View Post

So ultimately it will be a device that costs twice as much as a netbook (but with no keyboard)

I think you've stumbled on the crux of the paradigm shift Apple wants to create.

As an analogy, what happens if you think of the keyboard as a "walking stick" that's been required for using a computer until now? What if the keyboard has been necessary but now is slowing us down? (Think also of a manual/stick shift car? Propeller aircraft (instead of jet)? A VCR (instead of PVR)? Or a phone keypad (instead of iPhone touchscreen))

In 5 years time, Apple hopes your kind of comment might have transformed into:
"ultimately it was a touch device that cost twice as much as a netbook, but was no longer limited by a reliance on a keyboard interface and trackpad"

Of course - we first have to see what's demonstrated shortly.
And then see how it pans out over 5 years
post #92 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Just checked out the iWork apps to see how they’d work on a 10” tablet using an MSI Wind running Mac OS X. I had to “pretend” it was touch sensitive. None of the iWork app would work great as they are. Keynote works the best, which you can see for yourself, but remember that on a small display everything else will be cramped.

I’m not sure if iMovie will make it to that tablet, but as it likely won’t have the power needed to be useful, but the UI is pretty damn good for being completely touch-based. Check it out! I bring this up because I think rolling menus will be how Apple tackles the problem of making an viewer app into a good editing app on a touchscreen. A lot of the Tool bar elements in iWork and other apps may also employ a simple flicking action to get from one end of the row to the other while others might be best scrolling in from off the screen.

Regardless, of how they do it, I think it’s quite doable and therefore likely to be included.



1) If you’re not happy then you shouldn’t post on a thread that isn’t about a topic you’re not interested in.

2) Problems with and the people working on the 27” iMac situation have nothing to do with people working on iWork or a tablet.

3) Implying that tech sites should not report any other news until a flaw in one machine model in one size affecting many, but not all, buyers should be the only thing reported on is beyond silly.

4) They’ve reported on it plenty. If you have a problem with your iMac delay or technical issues with it there are plenty of articles and forums on this site for which you can discuss it. I’m sure AI will bring us an update as soon as there is one.

I think @rei_vilo got realize that!! Thanks @solipsism for ur brief.
post #93 of 173
I am not so sure about iWork on the table - because I don't think the tablet is being created as a productivity tool at all.

Rather, I think the tablet is intended as an antidote to productivity. It's a device which is purpose-built for entertainment, social networking and media consumption.

Sure, some productivity applications will be possible... but that that is not the intended point of the device.

C.
post #94 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALBIM View Post

These "complex multi-touch gestures" fits with the supposed steep learning curve rumor. Interesting...

I know Apple loves multi-touch, but it sounds like (three fingers and rotate instead of tapping) SJ is going a little crazy with it.

It wouldn't surprise me if that statement was a controlled leak, and when the demo it we won't see anything that complex, so we'll be surprised by its easy of use.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #95 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

I remind people that when the first Mac shipped with its mouse, the naysayers were extremely vocal.


However, the mouse remained relatively obscure until the appearance of the Apple Macintosh; in 1984 PC columnist John C. Dvorak ironically commented on the release of this new computer with a mouse: There is no evidence that people want to use these things.[2]
A mouse now comes with most computers and many other varieties can be bought separately.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_(computing)


A better version:

Dvorak's most famous prediction, coming in 1984 as a writer for the San Francisco Examiner, identified the Macintosh as a useless tool and the mouse as a 'new fangled' device he neither wanted nor needed. "The nature of the personal computer is simply not fully understood by companies like Apple (or anyone else for that matter). Apple makes the arrogant assumption of thinking that it knows what you want and need. It, unfortunately, leaves the why out of the equation - as in why would I want this? The Macintosh uses an experimental pointing device called a mouse. There is no evidence that people want to use these things. I dont want one of these new fangled devices."[7]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Dvorak#Controversy

Apple will do it right.

Yet 25 years later they still can't build a proper one. Irony written all over the place.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #96 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzos View Post

> If anyone can convince me I'm wrong, please do so. <

Couldn't be bothered; better just to wait and see.

You're wrong.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #97 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifterus View Post

Can somebody please explain the logic behind the hype of this device and why it won't end up like the Newton?

There's this cool handheld gadget called the iPhone made by a company called Apple. You should check it out.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #98 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

Why wouldn't this thing just come with iTunes? Most of us would agree that iTunes is in need of a rewrite so why not just start with a touch based version? To me this should be a device that an iPhone can sync to and not a device that has to constantly sync to your Mac.

Since over 60% of Macs purchased are laptops, it would mean that most Mac users would be syncing their 10" tablet to their 13"-15" Macbook/Pro. It would look very odd.

Since it will have wifi, It should since like Apple TV does wirelessly
post #99 of 173
It's beginning to sound like the Apple Tablet could indeed be a replacement for not just a netbook, but a full laptop. Here's an article that discusses this in more detail:

http://www.alltabletnews.com/2010/01...k-replacement/
post #100 of 173
See to me, if this Mac Touch is powerful enough to run iWork, then presumably it's powerful enough to run iLife. So if that's the case then the device needs ports to connect with raw content gathering devices, like a camera. Connecting the two via an intermediary computer, in my opinion, is the wrong answer.
http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Never argue with idiots, they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. - a bumper sticker

Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
Reply
http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Never argue with idiots, they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. - a bumper sticker

Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
Reply
post #101 of 173
It will certainly have USB... the iPhone and iPod do. It might even have an SD slot like the MacBooks and iMac. That should cover connectivity.

It does not need FW as most vid cams now have USB only.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #102 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsad23 View Post

The app store is apple's hidden treasure. Like the ipod touch and iphone, apple will sell the islate sans any apps and allow the user to fill up their shiny new purchase with all the $1, $5, $10 etc apps that they want.

I also feel that this will keep the price of the islate lower, but allow apple to keep the cash register ringing even after one purchases the device.

Because of my job, I'm forced to live in a cave in seclusion for 3 years - can you recommend a realtor?

I wish people would stop calling it the iSlate. Yabba Dabba Don't Apple!!
post #103 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

However, this being Apple, I'm relatively certain that whatever gesture vocabulary they've dreamed up will feel very natural and obvious, once you've used it. Which is why I'm also pretty certain the "three finger down" thing is just made up.

Yeah, I'm sure, too. That can't be an Apple gesture. Not by a long shot. If there is a slate up Steve's sleeve we can rest assured we ain't seen nothing like that yet.
post #104 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Care to explain?

Keep in mind, Apple will want to sell these tablets. They didn't create the iPhone or the iPod for the purpose of selling Macs, they created them for the purpose of selling iPhones and iPods. They have sold more Macs as a result because they put Apple products into the hands of more people, but not because either one of them required you to own a Mac.

Web access, quite possibly. But I think a web interface to productivity applications is not widely accepted yet, so if Apple goes that route, it better be far more developed than anything out there currently (including iWork.com in its current state), or it won't sell slates or Macs.

I generally agree with your argument, but I think you're first paragraph is wrong.

iPod sales leading to increased Mac sales was, in fact, a significant part of Apple's business plan. Therefore, I'd argue that Apple did create the iPod for the purpose of selling computers.

Steady iPod sales also allows Apple to choose its own price in the computer market also, as the volume of iPod sales continues to add to Apple's bottom line.

The iPhone, however, is something completely different.
post #105 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliphord View Post

The iPhone, however, is something completely different.

I think the iPhone is also another sales maker for Macs... as is the Touch. People get one, are impressed with the device and the thinking behind it and then look at Mac. Aren't MacBook and iMac sales higher than ever?

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #106 of 173
Here's how I'd use a tablet, if it had a necessary amount of what's predicted (but not all the bells and whistles people keep throwing in along with the kitchen sink). Looks like I'll be shooting another feature film this year (overseas! Much fun), and the tablet would be a great help. Usually on set, I have a script in one hand, that day's storyboard pages pinned up to a few boards, and a laptop (MBP) on my table for looking at reference footage, set design, graphics etc.

If the tablet could somehow let me look at my script on it and do rudimentary notes (this take good, change that word, cross this scene off), not necessarily full word processing, I'm good. If I can also flip to my digitized storyboard, I'm really fine. If I can look at video on my laptop (either networked to it, or streaming), I"m really, really excellent (I hate having to grab the laptop and bring it to my DP to show him something, while jumping over cables, etc., then bring the thing back to the table). All of that (which seems reasonable in a tablet) would save me a lot of time, and make me more productive.

If it could also work as a wireless video monitor (so I can "see" the shot from the camera), that makes me perfect - as I can go anywhere with my tablet and still have monitor access. One step further (but hardly necessary), if my script supervisor had one, and we were "linked," we could be in sync for shot lists, productions notes, etc.

Me, I think this is reasonable to expect from a tablet from Apple... none of it needs a full-blown OS X, but it does need some way to make "notes" on digitized data. So, can't wait to see.
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
post #107 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by icyfog View Post

See to me, if this Mac Touch is powerful enough to run iWork, then presumably it's powerful enough to run iLife. So if that's the case then the device needs ports to connect with raw content gathering devices, like a camera. Connecting the two via an intermediary computer, in my opinion, is the wrong answer.

Your presumption is incorrect.

Actually, office productivity applications are far less taxing on computing resources compared to media applications.

Moving around massive amounts of data (e.g., AVCHD footage) is highly processor, graphics, memory and disk intensive. A word processor or spreadsheet app is positively lightweight compared to that.

The tablet's multitouch input, battery constraints, CPU performance, memory capacity, storage capacity, graphics performance, etc. all point to an inability to handle full blown media editing applications like Photoshop, Logic, or Final Cut. Basic media editing tools ("lite" version of iPhoto and iMovie) are possible, but if I tried to run Final Cut Express on a tablet, the battery would be sucked dry before the render was up.

Let's face it, the tablet is going to be a consumer device, not one for "prosumer" users. If you have a little Flip camcorder or are using your point-and-shoot camera's video mode, yeah, you might want some basic editing tools on your tablet before you upload to YouTube. If you are carrying around a full-blown AVCHD camcorder and want to edit your videos on semi-pro editors, you would be plugging your device into your notebook or desktop computer anyhow.

You are not gonna have 250GB of disk scratch space on this year's tablet. Ain't gonna happen.
post #108 of 173
Quote:
However, this being Apple, I'm relatively certain that whatever gesture vocabulary they've dreamed up will feel very natural and obvious, once you've used it. Which is why I'm also pretty certain the "three finger down" thing is just made up.

I'm not sure what Apple has in store but the idea that any of the regular buying public wants to learn multi-touch gestures is out of line with how much they use the existing multitouch gestures. I would bet 99% of casual Mac buyers don't even know more than a couple gestures or that many of their apps have differing multi-touch gestures of their own.

There's also the very serious consideration that Mac devices don't always register touches correctly. That would be incredibly frustrating for working in an office app suite where speed and precision would be valued.

Then again, this is all rumor. Apple doesn't even think the average user is capable of dealing with folders on their iPhones, much less learning a set of "complex" multi-touch gestures that may differ between apps. In the end the device will be judged by Apple's core fans on its forward thinking, but by the rest of the public on how easy it is to operate vs their laptops. If this is supposed to be a productivity device with office programs like iWork, then it stands to reason that it will need to be able to compete with the devices that offer the same functionality. More than ever, I hope Apple allows the tablet to be used with an external keyboard, something they have refused to allow with the iPhone.
post #109 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzaslove View Post

Me, I think this is reasonable to expect from a tablet from Apple... none of it needs a full-blown OS X, but it does need some way to make "notes" on digitized data. So, can't wait to see.

I have much the same thoughts from a film production standpoint. Considering someone has made a video editing tool for the iPhone [which is nuts, really!]- it's going to be a measure easier to use video editing on a 10-11" tablet. That said- I don't think the tablet in this form factor wants or needs to be a standalone editing platform. Unless you're working in the very low end, no one is going to be finishing a project on a tablet like this. I think it can meet the needs of consumers, with some form of iMovie; but for pro users I think the possibilities of the tablet are for the production uses you mentioned. For post production, I see it as strictly an offline tool. Doing selects and rough assemblies with low resolution proxies- with the ultimate goal being to export an EDL to do your finishing on a proper online system.

I've said for a while now that the ultimate boon of the touch revolution is going to be the multi-touch keyboard. Bigger than a keyboard, this device will allow for custom interfaces for video, audio, and other graphics programs. Eliminating the static standard keyboard interface for something that has the virtual buttons, dials, faders, etc. that make more sense for these programs.
post #110 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian View Post

Doing selects and rough assemblies with low resolution proxies- with the ultimate goal being to export an EDL to do your finishing on a proper online system.

I could also see it helping me in a multiple person "group" situation. Say we're looking at dailies on a large screen being driven by a MP. Everyone in the room with a slate "could" have access to controlling things on the screen (like a giant white board where everyone has different colored pens). DP might find a take too soft (though they better have caught that in shooting, but let's just say), I may realize that a piece of one take is better than I thought, so I use the tablet to mark that section, my script supervisor may grab take-numbers, or something.

I don't expect a tablet (if it comes out) to do this immediately, but I don't see it being very far off, if one wanted it. Working out the "kinks" of multiple users having control of a computer doesn't seem to be that big a deal; we already have this "remote controlling" in OS X (and in Windows, Linux, etc.), so making it "easy" and "natural" is a next step.
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
post #111 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliphord View Post

I generally agree with your argument, but I think you're first paragraph is wrong.

iPod sales leading to increased Mac sales was, in fact, a significant part of Apple's business plan. Therefore, I'd argue that Apple did create the iPod for the purpose of selling computers.

Steady iPod sales also allows Apple to choose its own price in the computer market also, as the volume of iPod sales continues to add to Apple's bottom line.

The iPhone, however, is something completely different.

You may recall, the iPod originally worked only with a Mac. It didn't turn into the phenomenon it became until Apple released iTunes for Windows. When iPod sales started taking off, that's when we began to hear about the "halo effect" and increased sales of Macs, because a lot more people now had Apple tech in their pockets, and people flocking to Apple Stores to buy iPods were being exposed to the Mac in ways they never would have been before. In this respect the iPhone isn't something completely different, it's completely the same.

I think this aspect of Apple's market strategy is widely misunderstood. Many still wonder why Apple doesn't go head-to-head with Microsoft, by licensing OSX, or head-to-head with the OEMs, by selling cheaper hardware. It's because frontal assaults, especially against a stronger foe, are dumb. Again and again, we've seen Apple succeed by outflanking their competitors. Somebody at Apple is reading their Sun Tzu.

Neither the iPhone nor the iPod should be seen simply as stalking horses for Mac sales. Apple wants to sell all of these products, especially the ones with huge growth potential and big margins. They are building a brand identity with wide appeal based on an array of products. Accordingly I would not be at all surprised to see a version of iWork for Windows, if it helps them establish a new blockbuster product.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #112 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzaslove View Post

I don't expect a tablet (if it comes out) to do this immediately, but I don't see it being very far off, if one wanted it. Working out the "kinks" of multiple users having control of a computer doesn't seem to be that big a deal.

Definitely. If apple doesn't do it itself as an adjunct to their own pro applications, third parties will rush in to fill the void. Basically I think we both imagine the Slate as a production assistant, rather than a production tool in the strictest sense. And that's fine. As the power and performance on this form factor matures, the question of whether a tablet is better or worse for full editing/sound/whatever duties will sort itself out.

I started editing with film, then tape-to-tape, and now digital across multiple programs. Though digital editing undeniably has many advantages over the past, the one place I can see an improvement is through a more customized interface. Take the best of digital and analogue controls and create something that is intuitive and gets rid of all the keys you don't use on a standard keyboard.
post #113 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzaslove View Post

I could also see it helping me in a multiple person "group" situation. Say we're looking at dailies on a large screen being driven by a MP. Everyone in the room with a slate "could" have access to controlling things on the screen (like a giant white board where everyone has different colored pens). DP might find a take too soft (though they better have caught that in shooting, but let's just say), I may realize that a piece of one take is better than I thought, so I use the tablet to mark that section, my script supervisor may grab take-numbers, or something.

Guess you're hoping for a stylus then Not a lot of people gather for dailies in a controlled setting anymore. Its kinda wherever and whenever you can make it happen. For instance, Wolverine dailies were delivered on approximately 130 Digital Betacam Tapes, 500 XDCAM disks, 400 HDCAM SR tapes, and 2,500 DVDs and was run through the Bones Dailies integrated solution. Not sure where a Mac tablet fits into that kind of system.
post #114 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelcruncher View Post

Guess you're hoping for a stylus then Not a lot of people gather for dailies in a controlled setting anymore. Its kinda wherever and whenever you can make it happen. For instance, Wolverine dailies were delivered on approximately 130 Digital Betacam Tapes, 500 XDCAM disks, 400 HDCAM SR tapes, and 2,500 DVDs and was run through the Bones Dailies integrated solution. Not sure where a Mac tablet fits into that kind of system.

Actually, that's exactly the kind of thing I'd like the tablet to eventually do. I do "big room" dailies as well, and usually insist on certain of my team being there no matter what (it's like read-throughs when I can get the producer and actors to agree - a director's choice). When I can "control" the setting, that's fine. A tie-in to whatever method of daily integration is what I'm looking at (and it was only an example; I can think of many other times in production it would be useful). One has to control it somehow. Even if it's a secondary computer with large screen for group "note taking."

Also, on location, one always needs a "Mission Control" - usually a traveling editing suite, to take a look at stuff. The nice thing about HDvid and now HD3Dvid is the immediacy. The tablet would simply add to that immediacy. Again, the tablet could be a fine aid.
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
post #115 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelcruncher View Post

Guess you're hoping for a stylus then Not a lot of people gather for dailies in a controlled setting anymore. Its kinda wherever and whenever you can make it happen. For instance, Wolverine dailies were delivered on approximately 130 Digital Betacam Tapes, 500 XDCAM disks, 400 HDCAM SR tapes, and 2,500 DVDs and was run through the Bones Dailies integrated solution. Not sure where a Mac tablet fits into that kind of system.

No one product/solution works for every situation- Ultimately it will be up to developers [Apple or others] to create applications that work for a market and situation. Out of the box, the tablet is not going to solve everyones problems and do what everyone wants it to do- it can't. But with the success of the appStore, developers will jump in with both feet where they see opportunity.

And there will be more than one application for some uses, which is great. Cause if you take Navigation programs for example, you won't find consensus on which one is the best, cause different people like different things [obviously]. Apple merely has to provide the platform on which for that development to prosper.
post #116 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian View Post

As the power and performance on this form factor matures, the question of whether a tablet is better or worse for full editing/sound/whatever duties will sort itself out.

I started editing with film, then tape-to-tape, and now digital across multiple programs.

If you've been editing for years then you know that tablet editing is a very mature platform (Wacom tablets and Cintiqs are in every post house on the planet). You also probably know the MASSIVE storage needs required for editing. You also probably know how hot a CPU gets when working in a relatively simple program like Final Cut. Apple tablet as a control surface? Maybe. As an editor? Only as a convenience, certainly not as a professional solution in the near future. Will they hook it up to a camera for logging? That's certainly where a device like this could shine.
post #117 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian View Post

I started editing with film, then tape-to-tape, and now digital across multiple programs. Though digital editing undeniably has many advantages over the past, the one place I can see an improvement is through a more customized interface. Take the best of digital and analogue controls and create something that is intuitive and gets rid of all the keys you don't use on a standard keyboard.

Yeah, there's a lot that could be done as an interface device with this. A "smart" interface device... much like a yellow pad... very smart, been used to write songs, novels, poems, great mathematical theorems, etc. Now if we can figure out a way to do that digitally (and I'm NOT the guy to do that), I'm happy.

As for a stylus as someone mentioned... meh, I'm not expecting either a stylus or not a stylus. I'm not even expecting a tablet. I was simply looking at the "simplest hardware" that this tablet could be and seeing if there were somehow it would work for me where a desktop, laptop, iPhone wouldn't. I see a lot of people saying how they're going to use the new tablet like an old computer (and a few saying that doctors, real estate agents, Indian chiefs might use it). Me, I know EXACTLY how it might be useful for me... and not far from do-able.
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
"I used to be disgusted, but now I try to be amused."
Macbook Pro 2.2
Reply
post #118 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traqqer7777 View Post

It's beginning to sound like the Apple Tablet could indeed be a replacement for not just a netbook, but a full laptop. Here's an article that discusses this in more detail:

http://www.alltabletnews.com/2010/01...k-replacement/

I don't mind you linking to an article but not mentioning you wrote the article doesn't feel right. Do yourself a favor, if you want your site to be taken seriously say: "full disclosure it's my site".
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #119 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

You may recall, the iPod originally worked only with a Mac. It didn't turn into the phenomenon it became until Apple released iTunes for Windows. When iPod sales started taking off, that's when we began to hear about the "halo effect" and increased sales of Macs, because a lot more people now had Apple tech in their pockets, and people flocking to Apple Stores to buy iPods were being exposed to the Mac in ways they never would have been before. In this respect the iPhone isn't something completely different, it's completely the same.

I think this aspect of Apple's market strategy is widely misunderstood. Many still wonder why Apple doesn't go head-to-head with Microsoft, by licensing OSX, or head-to-head with the OEMs, by selling cheaper hardware. It's because frontal assaults, especially against a stronger foe, are dumb. Again and again, we've seen Apple succeed by outflanking their competitors. Somebody at Apple is reading their Sun Tzu.

Neither the iPhone nor the iPod should be seen simply as stalking horses for Mac sales. Apple wants to sell all of these products, especially the ones with huge growth potential and big margins. They are building a brand identity with wide appeal based on an array of products. Accordingly I would not be at all surprised to see a version of iWork for Windows, if it helps them establish a new blockbuster product.

Which reminds me of the oft cited Jobs quote from '96, shortly before he retook the reigns at Apple: "If I were running Apple, I would milk the Macintosh for all it's worth -- and get busy on the next great thing. The PC wars are over. Done. Microsoft won a long time ago."

Given that it's been widely reported that the iPhone was actually the first, somewhat pared down version of a tablet project that had been in the works for perhaps the last 10 years, you have to wonder if Apple isn't intent on simply changing the conversation away from the desktop market they can never dominate and over to a whole new paradigm. I don't think it's too much of a stretch to imagine that Apple (Jobs) sees their idea of a touch based computer as the new Mac compared to extent PCs-- even Apple's own PCs.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #120 of 173
It's great that the thread is finally starting to move towards a discussion of the *use* of the tablet as opposed to it's specs, which are likely to be unsurprising. It's really the UI and how we interact with this thing that is the most important aspect, but we know the least about it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzaslove View Post

... As for a stylus as someone mentioned... meh, I'm not expecting either a stylus or not a stylus. ...

This is a key point for me. I've been an enthusiastic user of computers since almost the day they first became available and in all that time, the one thing a computer has never been able to successfully replace is that simple thing you do when you pull out a pen and a piece of paper, or draw on the back of a napkin in a restaurant. It's one of the most natural human communication activities but it simply can't be done on a computer. The closest I ever got was a series of Palm and PocketPC devices with styluses but there were innumerable problems with them and they all needed a special stylus.

I don't want to see a stylus, but if there isn't some kind of solution in the tablet for simple drawing, then it will not be up to spec as far as I can see.

Sure, you'll be able to draw with your finger, and sure the bigger screen will make that even easier, but anyone who uses a pen seriously can tell you that a finger is not a pen and never will be. It's pretty obvious that pens and writing devices wouldn't have been invented at all, if fingers would suffice. The pen is probably the biggest single invention of all time and there is yet no handy, universal, natural, computerised replacement for it. If a tablet is going to replace pads of paper, it has to have some kind of pen or pen-like input.

The tablet either has to have a stylus (the easy solution), or it has to have some completely unknown, totally new way of making your fingers mimic a pen in software. If it doesn't, then it's only really solved the problem of keyboard entry, not stylus entry.

I'm trying to dial down my expectations at this point, so if the tablet doesn't solve this problem, I'll just buy a capacitive stylus, but I'm really hoping that Apple has thought up a solution for this with the tablet. If they have, IMO it qualifies as a sort of "last revolution" in computing. If it doesn't, then ... well at least there will be something around the corner to look forward to I guess.

Edit: from all the news stories I assumed capacitive styluses were available. Technically they are, but they all suck at anything but finger replacement, so I guess it's even more important to be able to draw on this thing I guess.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple tablet may ship with multi-touch version of iWork