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Claims of camera-equipped Apple tablet disputed - Page 4

post #121 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Having said that, I'm sure there are touch gestures which haven't occurred to us that, once demonstrated, will seem like the most natural thing in the world and will take little to no effort to master.

This sort of thing is impossible to simply talk about. It requires a lot of trial and error to get it right. Apple is the only company I know of that is in a position and has the desire to make the HW, OS and apps all work the way they want them to.

Quote:
One thing to bear in mind is that the original Fingerworks library of gestures were developed for a touch pad, not a touch screen. They don't assume that you're getting direct feedback under your fingers, so we have to factor that in when we consider what Apple might do.

This is why i think the gestures mentioned in a previous posting arent too far from the truth. If you are only interacting with your display for both input and output then you dont need complex gesturing, but if its a pad has not output you need a visual item on screen to represent your position or some combination gestures to perform tasks. A mouse works great because its a single point, but with a finger tips on a touchpad you cant easily have 2 to 5 mouse pointers on the screen.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #122 of 133
I think we're all in agreement that whatever Apple does, at least some of it will be things we could never have thought of, and, once we see it, we'll wonder why we didn't.

If they can make back touch work, intuitively and naturally, I'm all for it. I'm remain skeptical, however, although I'll be delighted to be proven wrong. And I'm pretty sure that if they can't make it intuitive and natural they won't do it, so.... win-win!
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #123 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Having said that, I'm sure there are touch gestures which haven't occurred to us that, once demonstrated, will seem like the most natural thing in the world and will take little to no effort to master.

One thing to bear in mind is that the original Fingerworks library of gestures were developed for a touch pad, not a touch screen. They don't assume that you're getting direct feedback under your fingers, so we have to factor that in when we consider what Apple might do.

I like this post much better than the one that preceded it.

I don't see Apple making some truly drastic change. Whatever they do, it must be comfortable to the majority of people.

That doesn't mean that they can't considerably extend what they've done. but only if most of those extensions aren't REQUIRED for useful operation of the tablet.

But we're back to the younger set. As long as this isn't TOO expensive, young people will relish new stuff to do what was difficult before. Look at how IMspeak has evolved. I admit that I don't understand half of it, but they do.

I'm sure than when the first typewriter came out in the 19th century, most people thought it too alien to use.
post #124 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I like this post much better than the one that preceded it.

I don't see Apple making some truly drastic change. Whatever they do, it must be comfortable to the majority of people.

That doesn't mean that they can't considerably extend what they've done. but only if most of those extensions aren't REQUIRED for useful operation of the tablet.

But we're back to the younger set. As long as this isn't TOO expensive, young people will relish new stuff to do what was difficult before. Look at how IMspeak has evolved. I admit that I don't understand half of it, but they do.

I'm sure than when the first typewriter came out in the 19th century, most people thought it too alien to use.

If kids can learn to type 60wpm on a freaking keypad, they can pretty much do anything.

Of course, for that to work Apple needs extremely widespread adoption, so much so that the new tablet UI becomes a natural part of being a kid. The only reason texting on phones is so second nature is that it became an absolute fixture, as common as watching television.

If a tablet were a successful but somewhat niche product, I don't think there would be the kind of peer pressure to master anything too arcane. Consider, too, that Apple seems to want to make devices useable by everyone. Although the iPod certainly became a mainstay of the younger set, there were no real barriers to entry for their parents.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #125 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

But we're back to the younger set. As long as this isn't TOO expensive, young people will relish new stuff to do what was difficult before. Look at how IMspeak has evolved. I admit that I don't understand half of it, but they do.

Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #126 of 133
Anyone remember a reoccurring feature in the old anthology magazine Heavy Metal called, I think, "1996"? It was from the late 70s, as I recall, and depicted a future where everyone spoke a kind of slurred over English that you have to look at a while to even decipher.

Oh cool, I found an image:



Looks like we made it.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #127 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

If kids can learn to type 60wpm on a freaking keypad, they can pretty much do anything.

Of course, for that to work Apple needs extremely widespread adoption, so much so that the new tablet UI becomes a natural part of being a kid. The only reason texting on phones is so second nature is that it became an absolute fixture, as common as watching television.

If a tablet were a successful but somewhat niche product, I don't think there would be the kind of peer pressure to master anything too arcane. Consider, too, that Apple seems to want to make devices useable by everyone. Although the iPod certainly became a mainstay of the younger set, there were no real barriers to entry for their parents.

That's why I think it's got to be easily usable for those of us who are too set in our ways, and at the same time, allow others to fly with new stuff.

I've been reading some interesting things lately.

One article noted that there is already generation gaps between those who are 20, those who are 17, those who are 14, and even younger kids, in what they do, how they do it, and the number of items they can juggle in their "multitasking.
post #128 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


Heh!

Good example.
post #129 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Looks like we made it.

Sprak fur yurzelve.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #130 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Anyone remember a reoccurring feature in the old anthology magazine Heavy Metal called, I think, "1996"? It was from the late 70s, as I recall, and depicted a future where everyone spoke a kind of slurred over English that you have to look at a while to even decipher.

Oh cool, I found an image:



Looks like we made it.

Yeesh!
post #131 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I like this post much better than the one that preceded it.

I don't see Apple making some truly drastic change. Whatever they do, it must be comfortable to the majority of people.

That doesn't mean that they can't considerably extend what they've done. but only if most of those extensions aren't REQUIRED for useful operation of the tablet.

But we're back to the younger set. As long as this isn't TOO expensive, young people will relish new stuff to do what was difficult before. Look at how IMspeak has evolved. I admit that I don't understand half of it, but they do.

I'm sure than when the first typewriter came out in the 19th century, most people thought it too alien to use.


I started doing a a multi quote of several recent posts, then noticed that you summed it up.

I wasn't clear in my posts, but I agree that Apple needs to build upon what they have as a UI, not replace it.

You should be able to use the larger tablet for typing just as you use the iPhone-- no reason not to!

Some things, like 2-thumb typing, won't be practical because the area is too large for it-- of course they could add 2 small iphone virtual kbs. Probably, it would be easier to adapt to a split kb where part was on each side.

But, that doesn't mean that Apple needs to restrict the tablet key entry to that of the iPhone.

Given the base capability of the iPhone, they could support additional means of key entry. such as (but not limited to);

1) full-size QWERTY kb on the display
2) full-size Dvorak KB on the display
3) full-size stenotype kb on the display (100-300 wpm average)
4) auto-size versions of the above according to the user's hand size
5) all of the above using the back of the device
6) let the user customize any or all of the above to his needs-- a custom kb app

If Apple has robust enough hardware, software and patents they could offer a kind of leggo set where those who cared to could experiment and develop a better kb UI.

I have to believe that there is a better way than the old, familiar, QWERTY kb.

Finally, here's a surprising key entry contest:

http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fu...oID=2025791097

*
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #132 of 133
If so..Planned Obsolescence.
post #133 of 133
The device does have a camera on front. I've been lucky enough to play with several prototypes and every single one had a forward facing camera, and a sim slot. This was about 1 1/2 years ago. The issue was since you are holding it most of the time, video conferencing will be shaky, but there are other uses.
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