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Chinese newspaper claims 22-inch touchscreen iMac coming in 2010 - Page 2

post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fonejacker View Post

Has anyone tried holding their arms out, pointing at a screen, try that for 10 seconds and hold, and repeat. After about a minute your arms ache. What a stupid idea. Fine for iSlate or Tablets, but not desktop computers, will never happen. And you will be cleaning the screen every 5 minutes.

Not if there was a way to make the screen go from flat to horizontal it wouldn't.

Besides, I've played with HP's touch screen for a few minutes and it was preaty cool. Just like NSIC Los Angeles (like the original a little more, Gibbs, Tony, Kate, Ziva, Jenny, Leon, Timmy, Abby, Dr mallard, Jimmy) and do a lot of watching on either the shows website or torrent. Not really ripping them off as some shows have ;15 second commercials.

Also not really into TV that much but after watching ABC Lost online for seasons 1,2 and borrowing Season 3,4 and most of 5 online only to discovery 5 was missing like 10 episodes did I discover torrents and then other shows like NCIS, Numb3rs, Fringe, a few Law and orders. Also prefer the criminal intent with Vincent Denofro, great actor.
Anyway, touch is plausible, very doable. Esoecially if you could mix 10 tracks with your fingers but it'll be a while before we see it working really well.

I'm also curios to know any hackntosh i7 8 core benchmarks and atcwhat orice it cost. I use a mbp with 24" glossy, hdmi 1920x1200 and hdmi inputs. The mbp is a 15" glossy with last of express port. Also had the non glossy. In a dark music studio very hard to tell the difference. I just worry about the heat it causes driving the 24 inch. Might sell it for a 27 inch iMac. Nit sure yet. Or hold out and just get both?

Later.
post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Yep plenty of uses for that.

And I'm not being sarcastic.

Music industry is gagging for a device of just that size. Imagine a DJ platter, decks would be a thing of the past. Imagine synthesiser controls. etc

Yes indeed. Pro Audio is my field. Imgine having it in your lap. The to a stand.
post #43 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Why does your headline refer to a Taiwanese newspaper, The Commercial Times, as being "Chinese"?

Much of the world considers Taiwan as a separate country.

Actually, hardly any countries consider Taiwan a "separate country" (legally speaking.) Even Taiwan's greatest supporter and ally, the US, does not.

This is a historical artifact resulting from former Taiwanese government claims that Taiwan and Mainland China were one country and that Taiwan was the soul legitimate representative of all Chinese people. Very few countries agreed to accept this wishful thinking.

Clearly this was a strategic mistake for Taiwan, since now the PRC has become a significant influence in the world and opposes any attempt for Taiwan to change this long standing policy. In effect though the ROC is a different country from the PRC, but they are both "China" which is really a cultural and geographic designation, not a political or national one.
post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Why does your headline refer to a Taiwanese newspaper, The Commercial Times, as being "Chinese"?

Much of the world considers Taiwan as a separate country.

Perhaps you should ask the 'Chinese'.

FYI, a Taiwanese newspaper is a place where it is published, as the New York Times is to New York city.

Many of people, particularly the older population living in Taiwan consider themselves 'Chinese'. They don't call themselves Taiwanians, Taiwanese citizens or citizens of Taiwan. The younger generations are more 'Taiwanese'. Overall, they are still Chinese. Sounds familiar?
post #45 of 60
Just more noise from the hype machine. Fie!

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #46 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

The people living in Taiwan consider themselves as Chinese. They don't call themselves Taiwanians, Taiwanese citizens or citizens of Taiwan.

Yeah they call themselves Formosans.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #47 of 60
It is bad enough seeing fingerprints on a screen that currently is NOT a touchscreen device! Imagine how "great" it would look with thousands of fingerprints all over it. Wow, the pictures and text will look....just terrible! I never understood why some people have to physically touch the computer screen to point something out. Give them a touchscreen and it will just be a mess!
post #48 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Anyone with common sense knows this won't happen.

Well, maybe not an iMac. However, there are tons of uses in point of sale for such a device. It would just have to run the same OS as the iPhone version p.o.s. units. Much less hardware required inside as well. Perhaps?
post #49 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Actually, hardly any countries consider Taiwan a "separate country" (legally speaking.) Even Taiwan's greatest supporter and ally, the US, does not.

This is a historical artifact resulting from former Taiwanese government claims that Taiwan and Mainland China were one country and that Taiwan was the soul legitimate representative of all Chinese people. Very few countries agreed to accept this wishful thinking.

Clearly this was a strategic mistake for Taiwan, since now the PRC has become a significant influence in the world and opposes any attempt for Taiwan to change this long standing policy. In effect though the ROC is a different country from the PRC, but they are both "China" which is really a cultural and geographic designation, not a political or national one.

Not to be too off-topic or wade into a political debate, but I feel it is important to address.

I agree that the issue of Taiwan's 'sovereign' status is complex. But it is incorrect to automatically assume that it is 'Chinese.' A great deal of US and international law would agree with me (see, e.g., http://www.taiwanadvice.com/plenary2yp.htm).

It is perfectly reasonable and legitimate, by default, to call something from Taiwan 'Taiwanese.'
post #50 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Not to be too off-topic or wade into a political debate, but I feel it is important to address.

I agree that the issue of Taiwan's 'sovereign' status is complex. But it is incorrect to automatically assume that it is 'Chinese.' A great deal of US and international law would agree with me (see, e.g., http://www.taiwanadvice.com/plenary2yp.htm).

It is perfectly reasonable and legitimate, by default, to call something from Taiwan 'Taiwanese.'

From the 2006 winter Olympics they are listed as:
China PR
Chinese Taipei (Taiwan)

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #51 of 60
A Wacom Cintiq in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqee_bB1LxY&NR=1.

It combines an LCD monitor and a tablet in one.

If Apple were to release a touchscreen iMac I could see it easily becoming standard equipment for artists.
post #52 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

From the 2006 winter Olympics they are listed as:
China PR
Chinese Taipei (Taiwan)

OK, last post on this issue.

Yes, "Chinese Taipei," would also be an appropriate reference. In which case, the headline should read "Chinese Taipei's newspaper claims...." (not "Chinese newspaper claims....")

But note that it also says "(Taiwan)" in parentheses. Incidentally, Taiwan is a member of WTO - arguably a far more important global forum for them compared to the Olympics - and their official WTO-given name is "Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan."

The only reason I bring this up is that AI is read all over the world, and it is perhaps important to use the most globally accepted nomenclature for these types of references.
post #53 of 60
That's great, then we could nave those 3 ft. long chalkboard pointers with the rubber tips like Miss. Fink, "her real name" used in Grammer School. She had a long reach as I remember. Clear across the next aisle. Could give you a clean wack without dropping a comment. \

Then there's homelife....got kids....purchase lots of Windex or Plastic wrap
You could install muti tear offs.......the ideas abound.....
post #54 of 60
maybe it's a bigger version of the tablet
post #55 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

A Wacom Cintiq in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqee_bB1LxY&NR=1.

It combines an LCD monitor and a tablet in one.

If Apple were to release a touchscreen iMac I could see it easily becoming standard equipment for artists.

... and architects and any drafting for engineering etc.
post #56 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tipton View Post

... and architects and any drafting for engineering etc.

Im not sure this would help in engineering. AutoCAD MEP is an ok advance, but all this requires straight lines and such. Drawing with a pencil is a step backwards IMO.
post #57 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

OK, last post on this issue.

Yes, "Chinese Taipei," would also be an appropriate reference. In which case, the headline should read "Chinese Taipei's newspaper claims...." (not "Chinese newspaper claims....")

But note that it also says "(Taiwan)" in parentheses. Incidentally, Taiwan is a member of WTO - arguably a far more important global forum for them compared to the Olympics - and their official WTO-given name is "Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan."

The only reason I bring this up is that AI is read all over the world, and it is perhaps important to use the most globally accepted nomenclature for these types of references.

There are complexities, but its not really that complex.
A few points.
• Chinese is a language.
• China is a geographical area.
• The island is called Taiwan.
• It is formerly a province of "China."
• Officially the Taiwanese government still claims to be a province of "China."
• Apple Insider referred to it as a "Chinese" newspaper, not a "Mainland China" or "Free China" paper.
• What is the paper called? It's called "The 'China' Times."
• Is the paper published in Taiwanese? No, it's published in Mandarin, the dialect of Northern China and the official language of both Taiwan and the PRC.
• Is the Taiwanese language Chinese? Yes.
• Are the PRC and the ROC the same place, No.

Consider this:
• Is South America part of America? (yes)
• Is the US called America? (yes)
• Is Brazil part of the United States? (no)
• Is Massachusetts is a former colony of England? (yes)
• Is New England in England?
• Are there "English" papers in Boston? (yes)
post #58 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

Im not sure this would help in engineering. AutoCAD MEP is an ok advance, but all this requires straight lines and such. Drawing with a pencil is a step backwards IMO.

Surely it would work just as well as using a mouse. Touch a point and then drag to where you want the line to go. The software creates a straight line between the two points.

The advantage is you are not interacting with one thing whilst looking in a different direction.
post #59 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

There are complexities, but its not really that complex.
A few points.
<list>

Consider this:
<list>

Excellent argument and well made point.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #60 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Surely it would work just as well as using a mouse. Touch a point and then drag to where you want the line to go. The software creates a straight line between the two points.

The advantage is you are not interacting with one thing whilst looking in a different direction.

Good point. I guess it would all be in the way it's done. Snapping to points would be beneficial with a finger touch or a pen point.
Edit: Although, drawing lines isn't just drawing lines, especially Architecturally or Mechanically. There would need to be a way to dimension the lines accurately. This is done by keyboard input, and I still don't see the advantage of the pencil for the most part.

One of the better mechanical CAD/CAM programs I've used is EastCoast. Horrible UI from the DOS days, though. I think they have gone solely AutoCAD plugin at this point, although I haven't had the chance to use it.
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