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iPad Likes/Dislikes - Page 2

post #41 of 80
Likes:
- Finally someone trying to get tablet computing right, great first step

Dislikes:
Way too many corners cut:
- resolution should have been 1280x1024 to also best the Kindle DX
- every model should have been upgradable to GPS/3G, not a decision from the start
- missing 2. dock connector on the long side to use iPad as photo viewer when docked/charging, most photos are landscape and look silly in a portrait orientation
- missing SD slot for easier (dongle-less) photo transfer from camera, also as storage expansion
- missing built-in camera, not only for video conferencing, developers would have found many smart/fun uses
post #42 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post

Likes:
- Finally someone trying to get tablet computing right, great first step

Dislikes:
Way too many corners cut:
- resolution should have been 1280x1024 to also best the Kindle DX
- every model should have been upgradable to GPS/3G, not a decision from the start
- missing 2. dock connector on the long side to use iPad as photo viewer when docked/charging, most photos are landscape and look silly in a portrait orientation
- missing SD slot for easier (dongle-less) photo transfer from camera, also as storage expansion
- missing built-in camera, not only for video conferencing, developers would have found many smart/fun uses

I actually agree with all of these.
post #43 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post

Likes:
- Finally someone trying to get tablet computing right, great first step

Dislikes:
Way too many corners cut:
- resolution should have been 1280x1024 to also best the Kindle DX
- every model should have been upgradable to GPS/3G, not a decision from the start
- missing 2. dock connector on the long side to use iPad as photo viewer when docked/charging, most photos are landscape and look silly in a portrait orientation
- missing SD slot for easier (dongle-less) photo transfer from camera, also as storage expansion
- missing built-in camera, not only for video conferencing, developers would have found many smart/fun uses

Would you be happy with a starting price of 799? Cutting costs makes the base iPad a bargain, and still better than any other tablet or netbook at the same price.
post #44 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevegmu View Post

Would you be happy with a starting price of 799?

That surely was the whole point Jobs wanted to make...


As for myself I'd pay $799 to get the extra specs I listed.
But that price won't nearly generate as much buzz.
And certainly less traction in the education and medical markets.

I just don't like the idea of an iPad 2 coming out in 2011 with those features added.
All developers who just scrambled to update their applications from iPhone to iPad resolutions have to go back to square one and do it all again for the iPad 2's new resolution.
Not so good IMHO.

Apple should at least have aimed for a higher resolution from the start and stick with that for a few years.

But perhaps the iPad's GPU part isn't up to sizes larger than 1024x768...
And who knows Apple might still stick to 1024x768 for a couple of years. Which would be lame too.
post #45 of 80
I did some quick photoshopping to see what the iPad would look like with a bezel that was half as
thick & a version where the screen is in the letterbox format:

http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p...o/ee6a5688.jpg

Can someone post the pic in this thread? For some reason I can only get the link to show up.
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post #46 of 80
post #47 of 80
Nice job mello!

Re Letterbox:
While great for movies, it seems this version is a bit too small to read books/magazines comfortably.
The ideal aspect ratio would probably be more like A4 paper (roughly 7:5).
Otherwise 4:3 is probably better than 16:9.

Re Bezel:
Looking at these helpful pictures I think I actually like the bigger one better. It looks more balanced.
And is certainly easier to hold.
post #48 of 80
That's a pretty interesting image. It tells me two things:

--The widescreen format doesn't look useful for anything but video. I think Apple made a choice, here, to somewhat compromise video playback formatting in favor of the most all around useful size. Books, in particular I think, benefit from the 3:4 aspect ratio.

-- The bezel accounts for a surprising amount of real estate. If Apple made the middle device, they would lose a lot of room for componentry and the battery, resulting in either a thicker case or shorter battery life or both.
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post #49 of 80
Likes
- Omission of camera
- Size and form factor
- iWork

Dislikes
- omission of USB ports and SD slot
- missing iLife funcionality in apps such as iTunes (direct imports), Photos (management, book creation, ordering prints)

Things I'd like to know
- How will storage of documents be managed?
- How about multi-user support?
- What ports do the docs offer?
- Will you be able to print from the iPad?
- WIll Apple create some kind of home server / home cloud software that will allow you to store all your files in a central location (Mac mini server?) and make them accessible from every computer around the house?
post #50 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post

Nice job mello!

Re Letterbox:
While great for movies, it seems this version is a bit too small to read books/magazines comfortably.
The ideal aspect ratio would probably be more like A4 paper (roughly 7:5).
Otherwise 4:3 is probably better than 16:9.

Re Bezel:
Looking at these helpful pictures I think I actually like the bigger one better. It looks more balanced.
And is certainly easier to hold.

I actually like it with the bezel being 1/2 sized. That's what Apple shoulda done. Also, they shoulda debuted iphone OS 4.0 with the iPad. I think that would have made the difference.
post #51 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olternaut View Post

I actually like it with the bezel being 1/2 sized. That's what Apple shoulda done. Also, they shoulda debuted iphone OS 4.0 with the iPad. I think that would have made the difference.

They probably couldn't as the software is not ready.

Jobs said many times that nowadays it's the software which makes new hardware a 'breakthrough' item.
And by the looks of it, the iPad just doesn't seem 'finished' software-wise.


So I wouldn't be surprised if the camera was planned but pulled last minute since the whole iChat/iMovie suite for iPad is not nearly finished yet.
Same with Garageband and OS 4.0.


So why not wait another 6-12 months and finish the OS and key software before releasing the iPad?
I think Apple was pushed to release it.
Too many competitors, especially Google, are gearing up and forced Apple's hand.
It's still an alright release. But seems it should have been more complete.

That's what it looks like to me.
Which means we'll see an iPhone style replay:
OS 2 (here 4.0) and iPhone 3G (iPad Pro?) will both arrive a year later and be the 'true' first release.
post #52 of 80
Likes:

- The iPad itself…!

Dislikes:

- I don't have one yet…?
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post #53 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

That's a pretty interesting image. It tells me two things:

--The widescreen format doesn't look useful for anything but video. I think Apple made a choice, here, to somewhat compromise video playback formatting in favor of the most all around useful size. Books, in particular I think, benefit from the 3:4 aspect ratio.

-- The bezel accounts for a surprising amount of real estate. If Apple made the middle device, they would lose a lot of room for componentry and the battery, resulting in either a thicker case or shorter battery life or both.

I could see the middle version being possible on the 2nd or 3rd generation iPad with chip
miniaturization & consolidation & new battery technology.
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post #54 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post

They probably couldn't as the software is not ready.

Jobs said many times that nowadays it's the software which makes new hardware a 'breakthrough' item.
And by the looks of it, the iPad just doesn't seem 'finished' software-wise.


So I wouldn't be surprised if the camera was planned but pulled last minute since the whole iChat/iMovie suite for iPad is not nearly finished yet.
Same with Garageband and OS 4.0.


So why not wait another 6-12 months and finish the OS and key software before releasing the iPad?
I think Apple was pushed to release it.
Too many competitors, especially Google, are gearing up and forced Apple's hand.
It's still an alright release. But seems it should have been more complete.

That's what it looks like to me.
Which means we'll see an iPhone style replay:
OS 2 (here 4.0) and iPhone 3G (iPad Pro?) will both arrive a year later and be the 'true' first release.

I hope your right. And I hope that iphone OS 4.0 is something special. The competition is going to be fierce by June and that's when the 3G version is coming out right?
As it is now though, competition or not, people are going to wait because of the rumors of a price drop for the 1.0 iPad. Customer's won't get suckered on the price like they did with the 1.0 iphone this time around.
Also, there is going to be a sizeable number that will wait till iPad 2.0 and that will include me as well.
post #55 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by RolandG View Post

Likes
- Omission of camera

Why would you "like" the omission of a camera? It's something you can choose to use, or not. At most the components and engineering combined cost Apple $5. You like that you save $5 for something that could prove useful for most users in many ways?

I think that the rumor that Apple is having camera supply chain problems might have some truth in them. There's absolutely no other reason the iPad shouldn't have a front-facing iSight. Or maybe the other rumor is true, that it's a 2.0 feature designed to get early users to double-dip.
post #56 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

I think that the rumor that Apple is having camera supply chain problems might have some truth in them. There's absolutely no other reason the iPad shouldn't have a front-facing iSight. Or maybe the other rumor is true, that it's a 2.0 feature designed to get early users to double-dip.

Absolutely no other reason is even conceivable?
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post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Absolutely no other reason is even conceivable?

OK maybe I'm exaggerating, but those two seem the most likely to me. Cost savings really isn't a compelling enough reason.
post #58 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

OK maybe I'm exaggerating, but those two seem the most likely to me. Cost savings really isn't a compelling enough reason.

You could be right, but I can think of another issue or two that might have prevented its appearance. The main question in my mind is about implementation. In their testing Apple may have found that cameras don't work very well in hand-held devices without some sort of image stabilization or other software solutions that they haven't developed yet. They won't want to include a major feature that will become the butt of jokes later. You can easily imagine the sniggering over how the iPad turns video conferences into the Blair Witch Project. I also wonder about the impact of a camera on battery life. Could be a combination of many factors. I suspect it is.
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post #59 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

You could be right, but I can think of another issue or two that might have prevented its appearance. The main question in my mind is about implementation. In their testing Apple may have found that cameras don't work very well in hand-held devices without some sort of image stabilization or other software solutions that they haven't developed yet. They won't want to include a major feature that will become the butt of jokes later. You can easily imagine the sniggering over how the iPad turns video conferences into the Blair Witch Project. I also wonder about the impact of a camera on battery life. Could be a combination of many factors. I suspect it is.

The demand for features never seems to trouble itself much with the particulars of implementation. As you say, a front facing camera on a hand held device would have some real usability problems, but already the lack of a camera has ossified into a bullet point on the endlessly iterated "why the iPad sux" list.
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post #60 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

The demand for features never seems to trouble itself much with the particulars of implementation. As you say, a front facing camera on a hand held device would have some real usability problems, but already the lack of a camera has ossified into a bullet point on the endlessly iterated "why the iPad sux" list.

These discussions remind me of the book written a number of years ago by Alan Cooper, "The Inmates are Running the Asylum." In short he says that one of the big problems with technology design is that it's too often about geeks making things that other geeks like. He suggests the process has to be reversed. The people who understand how to solve human problems should be in charge. I think somebody at Apple must have read this book, maybe even Steve himself. Apple is as close to implementing Cooper's advice as any tech company I can think of. Microsoft is definitely still doing it the old fashioned way.
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post #61 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

These discussions remind me of the book written a number of years ago by Alan Cooper, "The Inmates are Running the Asylum." In short he says that one of the big problems with technology design is that it's too often about geeks making things that other geeks like. He suggests the process has to be reversed. The people who understand how to solve human problems should be in charge. I think somebody at Apple must have read this book, maybe even Steve himself. Apple is as close to implementing Cooper's advice as any tech company I can think of. Microsoft is definitely still doing it the old fashioned way.

Yep, and it's interesting how Apple's human-centric engineering riles up the geeks. They seem to actually take it personally, and regard "easy to use" as a terrible dumbing down of their precious tech that will lead to some kind of mass lowering of the ambient IQ.

I guess I've said this elsewhere, but I actually do believe that the rise of computer technology as a central aspect of our culture has in turn empowered people who were previously, and rightfully, somewhat marginalized. The borderline autistic, for whom the world is properly seen as a logical system within which the messiness of being human looks like "noise" and all problems yield to the rigorous application of statistical analysis or engineering are not really the people you want driving the car. Very useful, can lead productive and rewarding lives, but not good candidates to be the architects of society.
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post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yep, and it's interesting how Apple's human-centric engineering riles up the geeks. They seem to actually take it personally, and regard "easy to use" as a terrible dumbing down of their precious tech that will lead to some kind of mass lowering of the ambient IQ.

I'm a geek and I love it. Of course, I do user interfaces so...

Quote:
I guess I've said this elsewhere, but I actually do believe that the rise of computer technology as a central aspect of our culture has in turn empowered people who were previously, and rightfully, somewhat marginalized. The borderline autistic, for whom the world is properly seen as a logical system within which the messiness of being human looks like "noise" and all problems yield to the rigorous application of statistical analysis or engineering are not really the people you want driving the car. Very useful, can lead productive and rewarding lives, but not good candidates to be the architects of society.

Okay...you can call me geek but borderline autistic is a tad much don't you think?
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yep, and it's interesting how Apple's human-centric engineering riles up the geeks. They seem to actually take it personally, and regard "easy to use" as a terrible dumbing down of their precious tech that will lead to some kind of mass lowering of the ambient IQ.

I guess I've said this elsewhere, but I actually do believe that the rise of computer technology as a central aspect of our culture has in turn empowered people who were previously, and rightfully, somewhat marginalized. The borderline autistic, for whom the world is properly seen as a logical system within which the messiness of being human looks like "noise" and all problems yield to the rigorous application of statistical analysis or engineering are not really the people you want driving the car. Very useful, can lead productive and rewarding lives, but not good candidates to be the architects of society.

Ouch. Revenge of the nerds backlash.

A few months ago I watched a PBS news interview with Ken Auletta about his book "Googled." I haven't read the book, but I suppose I should since some of his comments about the way is run Google stuck in my mind. Transcript here (video also available):

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/scien...gle_11-18.html

Read or watch towards the end where he talks about both the strengths and weaknesses of a company run by engineers. So interesting.
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post #64 of 80
Likes:
+ Video output
+ Battery life
+ iWork
+ Design
+ Multitouch
+ The price is pretty resonable

Dislikes:
- The wait
- Missing iSight
- I already bought a kindle
- No Multitasking
- No Flash
post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahB View Post

Likes:
+ Video output
+ Battery life
+ iWork
+ Design
+ Multitouch
+ The price is pretty resonable

Dislikes:
- The wait
- Missing iSight
- I already bought a kindle
- No Multitasking
- No Flash

You bought a Kindle and yet you dislike how the iPad lacks multitasking and flash? it isn't as big a deal as it is made to be. But that's just one man's (me) opinion.
I like the Kindle, but the price is a bit too much, unless e-ink displays are expensive to make, I dunno. I'm gonna assume they are, I like Amazon (Prime member) and hate to think of them as ripping me off. Then again you do get free Whispernet.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/04/22/i...net-says-shhh/

I suggest that you wait for the next generation iPad -and to all those who can afford to wait-, hopefully by then Apple would have added things like iSight and maybe even iChat and iLife. Sadly, I can't as I need the iPad yesterday.
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post #66 of 80
I don't know what the big deal is about the lack of multi-tasking. On my iPhone the only time I
find it necessary is when I'm on a call & I need to find some other info from another app which I
have no problems doing.
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post #67 of 80
Do you guys think the IBooks App will have a mobile version for the Iphone like Kindle has made? That way I can view books i buy on Itunes on my phone as well?
post #68 of 80
Why is *anyone* bitching about price? The iPad starts at *half* the price the world was estimating.

Just skip the 16GB, buy the 32GB for $599, and be done.

3G isn't worth the $130 premium; in fact I specifically said I would NOT buy an iPad if it required 3G services; last thing I want is another monthly bill.

It's nice that it turned out to be unlocked, but I've got an iPhone for carrying around. I'm not going to carry an iPad everywhere I go. I might use it on the plane, again, where 3G is useless. When traveling I'll have a laptop anyway. I've got a 3G cell card for my laptop already. I've got an iPhone.
post #69 of 80
I wouldn't mind having one JUST to read digital books.
post #70 of 80
I'm going to use the iPad every single day for my job, and there's no other device currently on the market that could possibly serve the same purpose (short presentations, slide shows and demonstrations to a small group directly from the device).

I'm an ESL kindergarten teacher! This will revolutionize my job. Even better if the speakers are LOUD. Otherwise I'll have to keep depending on my awesome Altec Orbit. Hmm... I just thought of something... If there were a product like the Orbit that had Bluetooth audio, that would be absolutely perfect.

I also am looking forward to using my iPad to control my future Home Media Center (Mac Mini connected to my hi-fi and an HD panel). I Love the Remote application for my iPod Touch when I've got my MacBook Pro connected to my living room display and hi-fi. I fully expect many more robust "remote" apps to appear for the Touch to control mac-based Media. If someone could make a video "Remote" app that can also manage BT downloads to the Mac, that would be absolutely incredible.

I'm still on the fence as to whether to wait for the 3G model. It's not necessary for my main uses (the above and gaming) but it certainly might come in handy to have the option (I'm constantly searching for open Wi-Fi networks with my iPod Touch, to check eMail or bus schedules or maps or something). And cellular data is much cheaper here in HK than it is in the US.

Oh, and then books. I WILL read on my iPad. I have Stanza on my iPod Touch and I love it for reading free Project Gutenberg classics. But it's just too small. As it is, I am ashamed to admit the iPod Touch has very adversely affected my reading habits, as I now have so much more to do during my commute (games mostly, as I'm a board games and turn-based RPG addict). I'm hoping the reading experience on the iPad will be good enough to distract me from the games with something which is a slightly better intellectual exercise.
post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mello View Post

I don't know what the big deal is about the lack of multi-tasking. On my iPhone the only time I
find it necessary is when I'm on a call & I need to find some other info from another app which I
have no problems doing.

We've covered this a thousand times, but the most obvious one is you listening to music in one of the non Apple apps (say Simplify Media or Pandora) and want to do something else at the same time. You can't. You can either listen to music, or surf the net. Listen to music, or write something in Pages. That's but one example.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reidconti View Post

Why is *anyone* bitching about price? The iPad starts at *half* the price the world was estimating.

To put it into perspective, the Kindle DX is $489 for a device that can only read books.
post #72 of 80
Likes:
- Looks

Dislikes:
- It is not a Tablet Mac
- It is a iPhone on steroids
- Only Apps to use
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Could a pogo-stylus and a third party note app give handwriting recognition?

Likes:
Price.

Dislikes:
Price.

ditto
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post #74 of 80
iPad Likes

It's thin form factor

long battery life

portable games

great for young children


iPad dislikes

1: locked device

2: the App Store as the only source of software

3: the glossy screen, reflections are hard on the eyes

4: the lack of screen control and detail like a cursor provides, fingers are just too fat.

5: the low storage, 64Gb is pitiful.

6: can't user replace the battery

7: can't user replace the storage

8: limited OS capability

9: dependent upon another computer to work

10: have to hold it in place to use

11: large touch screen will incur damage faster, as it can't be protected without blocking,films will have to be applied and reapplied to eliminate the scratches to come

12: the corny UI,

13: lack of Flash support

14: the inability to run other browsers (could change later)

15: inability to install software or products Apple doesn't like or conflicts with their products or provides a solution Apple doesn't care to be involved with

16: Apple's disney-like approach, allowing some things and then deciding to remove them, flippant behavior, lack of planning and foresight

17: the high price for a device that serves little needs

18: Apple's iPad solutions require one to pay more and more, it's a up-cycle product big time

19: the iPad is essentially a crippled MacBook with all it's parts removed and sold separately, it's NOT a answer to the netbook market as one can get a netbook for as little as $300 complete! with Ubuntu Linux it would be secure on the internet as well.

20: the crappy touchscreen keyboard with no tactile response, going to ruin the future touch typists

21: the App Store failure, it's slow, hard to find anything worth a darn and most apps are crap

22. the hardware has limited function, so apps will also

23: teens will be stunted in their computer learning the longer they use the iPad as it's not reflective of the windows GUI used in jobs

24: the simple UI is insulting to more mature computer users, on a small portable device yes the needs are different, on a large screen acting like a real computer, no.

25: because it's not a Mac Tablet


There you have it, 25 reasons to leave your lover.


The iPad is dependent upon a real computer, this means people who buy this device already knows computers and has a need for a less complicated device, making it a niche device, a accessory. An appliance.

There is the iBookStore but that was a very short lived advantage. It didn't take long for Amazon to make a Kindle program for the Mac and there is already CourseSmart and other e-textbook reader software for Mac's and PC's as well.

The iPad screen is going to get scratched so bad as to make the device undesirable to use. Since one has to touch the screen all the time, all it takes is the tiniest bit of sand or dirt to be swiped along the finger swipe to cause a scratch. Since this device is aimed at children, who are the toughest on everything as they are ignorant, it's going to be much worse. Screens were never meant to be touched, as evidenced by Apple Stores selling protective films for their devices as a band-aid solution.

Will the iPad accept mouse input though the keyboard/stand? You see where this is going now?

The iPad is a broken up netbook, which one will turn into a netbook with all the extra hardware parts and pay as much money as a MacBook laptop with more capability.

Apple is not answering the $300-$400 netbook market with their own solution, they took their low end laptop market and broke it up, is charging for the pieces and giving people LESS capability than before.

The iPad is not a must have device, like the iPod was amongst the general computing using crowd. It will sell well in it's niche, for those who need a controlled and dumbed down device.

Apple is already receiving considerable flack from schools about their glossy screen low end computers being hard for students to use in class, I can see the touchscreen iPad receiving even more flack because they will need constant cleaning and because of scratches/shattering/cracks.

Schools need the Apple equivalent of Toughbook laptops, with their closed design protecting the screen and protection from being sat on or dropped.


I called the iPod success correctly with my investor friends with the very first device.

I called the failure of the Mighty Mouse correctly.

I'm predict the iPad will have some success in it's niche, like the MacBook Air, but it won't see widespread use amongst the general computing crowd. It will see it's main sales with school children after the initial fanboy "must buy everything of Apple" rush and that's about it.

I don't see the internet removing Flash just for a niche product, unless the iPad sales are so great that ignoring it can't be a option. Since the iPad has limited capability and a high price tag, I don't see that happening.

Steve shouldn't have dissed Adobe so bad, instead concentrated on the iPad problems and sold a lot of the devices that would make it attractive for Adobe to rework Flash for it.
post #75 of 80
Quote:
The Wall Street Journal on Thursday revealed that it will be asking $18 per month for a subscription to the newspaper on the iPad, significantly more than it charges for delivery of a physical copy of the newspaper ($9.20/month), online access ($8/month) or a printed copy and online access ($12/month).


$18 a month + $500 iPad/limited storage + computer/lots of storage

or

$8 a month + computer/lots of storage


iPad e-Reader = FAIL
post #76 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

iPad e-Reader = FAIL

That's a bit harsh.
We haven't even seen the actual products yet.

Your FAIL is that you compare apples to oranges and claim that because one is cheaper (or has more listed features) it is also therefore better.
A mistake many iPad critics make.


You cannot compare a touch-operated tablet device to a laptop computer.

An analogy I'd like to make is motorbike vs. car. Both get you from A to B. So which is better? The one with more storage and more (listed) features?
The car is more convenient, has ample storage, comes with air conditioning and a roof to protect against the elements.
The bike however is more nimble, allows to sneak between cars to get you even faster to B, has it easier to find a parking space and as many would argue is more fun to ride.
The iPad being the bike here with limited storage but a more fun touch interface and the car being the laptop with more storage and extras like a real keyboard.

If your over-simplified logic would hold true then there wouldn't be any bikes in this world.
Everyone would just drive a car.
But that's not the case as bikes (and iPads) have great advantages for certain uses. And both are probably more fun to use.


Regarding content I'm sure the same applies as you are also comparing two different kinds of content.
An analogy here would be saying a paperback edition at $6.99 is always better than a movie ticket at $12.99!
According to that logic everyone would just read books.

The online WSJ content is merely text, pretty much the same as the printed edition.
Whereas the iPad content, as has been showcased during the iPad introduction, is interactive with a lot of extra information, movie clips and many more image galleries.


Unless people have extensively used and tested both the iPad and the iPad WSJ, you can't say whether the former is really always inferior to a laptop and the latter always inferior to the web edition.

Very likely neither.
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post

The online WSJ content is merely text, pretty much the same as the printed edition.

Whereas the iPad content, as has been showcased during the iPad introduction, is interactive with a lot of extra information, movie clips and many more image galleries.


Children and some adults might be interested in interactive content in publications to keep themselves occupied, but most adults in general are bombarded with enough information as it is without having to work more and pay more on top of it.

Also if interactive content was such a hit, then the WSJ web edition would have had it already, working on more powerful and common regular computers than a mere 1GHz iPad.

People who read the WSJ need vital info in a short time frame, they are very unlikely to interact with content on the device and pay more money, especially for the hardware


I see interactive comic books as a real avenue worth pursuing, the market segment is right, the activity level is right and the price is right too.
post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

Children and some adults might be interested in interactive content in publications to keep themselves occupied, but most adults in general are bombarded with enough information as it is without having to work more and pay more on top of it.

You're ignoring the raison d'être of the iPad-- extremely well executed direct touch interaction with your data is fundamentally different experience from conventional computers.

Quote:
Also if interactive content was such a hit, then the WSJ web edition would have had it already, working on more powerful and common regular computers than a mere 1GHz iPad.

See above. Not really seeming where "more powerful and regular computers" enter into it though. The iPad will almost certainly run the kinds of interactivity it is designed for quite well. Is there something about pointing and clicking with a mouse or trackpad on a "real" computer that makes interactivity more compelling? Are there secret kick-ass kinds of interactivity that require desktop class processors that I'm unaware of?

Quote:
People who read the WSJ need vital info in a short time frame, they are very unlikely to interact with content on the device and pay more money, especially for the hardware

Anyone accessing the WSJ online are already interacting with content on a device. The iPad arguably makes that interaction faster and easier. As far as hardware costs, it seems unlikely that anyone will be buying an iPad exclusively to look at the WSJ.
Quote:
I see interactive comic books as a real avenue worth pursuing, the market segment is right, the activity level is right and the price is right too.

Yeah, sure, because it's for children, we get that. We also get than when anyone else makes a similar product with a similar approach to UI it will be magically serious. Next.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #79 of 80
I like that mine will be here in a week.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

Children and some adults might be interested in interactive content in publications to keep themselves occupied, but most adults in general are bombarded with enough information as it is without having to work more and pay more on top of it.

You certainly have a point in regards to gimmicky interactivity.


But multimedia is not bad in itself. And each bit of information has an ideal way of being presented.

Opinions and background stories are typically best expressed in words.
Yet to describe a work of art, or the extent of a natural disaster with words is not ideal, a picture will always tell you more.
And people's reactions, a performance or any kind of motion will always be best conveyed by a movie clip.

With the iPad the WSJ has the chance to break out of its mere text (and occasional image/video) form into true multimedia.
This is why the iPad edition will also be more expensive.


But you are right if those are only used as added bells and whistles with little extra information, then it is going to be a waste of money.
It will be up to the WSJ to make the right decisions on which story is best told via words, images, interactive charts or movie clips.

But the mixture can be better than any of these on their own.
And then it is worth spending a little extra on.

Essentially it is doing exactly what you ask for:
help you fight the information overflow by using the best medium to get each story across the fastest.


And I am still convinced that touch computing is too nascent for most people to really grasp. They cannot see the point.
Yet there is no point in 'understanding' it. You have to physically experience it. And for a while - and then go back to a mouse, pointing stick or touchpad.
It's like trying to understand the subtle flavors of an award winning food creation - without ever tasting it. You will not understand the point.

The way I see it is that human-computer interaction will also go the 'multimedia way':
there is no one best way to interact with a computer, instead use whatever medium is best for the intended computing use at hand.
Certain computing uses will always benefit from a keyboard. Others will require large screens. Many artists already use pen tablets because a mouse just doesn't do it.
And eventually there will be computing uses that work best with a good touch interface.

And I think people will be surprised at how many those will be!
It won't be just eBook reading and web browsing! There will be many uses we don't really use a computer for today.

Examples:
Sharing photos with friends on an iPad will work much better than on a laptop or mobile phone. Those just aren't ideal. I would never consider opening up my laptop in a restaurant to show pictures to friends. That'd be really awkward, especially if you want to show 2 or more people at the same time as only people in front of the laptop can see the screen. Yet with an iPad this will all be very natural.

Or think of digital board games. You can place the iPad down on a table and play a game of chess, backgammon or monopoly very easily with friends. Again, this would be very awkward on a laptop computer or a tablet with pen input.
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