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3.1M iPhone, 1M e-reader additions help AT&T gain on Verizon

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
AT&T exceeded expectations last quarter by adding 2.7 million new wireless subscribers and activating 3.1 million new iPhones, well ahead of the 2.2 million subscribers competitor Verizon added in the same period.

The activation of 3.1 million iPhones represented the second-highest quarter in the history of Apple's handset on the AT&T network. The best was in the summer of 2009, when the nation's second-largest wireless provider activated a record 3.2 million iPhones.

AT&T now has 85.1 million total subscribers, and continues to gain on Verizon, the market leader. Verizon, earlier this week, reported a total subscriber base of 91.2 million.

For all of 2009, AT&T added 7.3 million new subscribers, which was the company's best-ever annual total. AT&T reported 51 cents of diluted earnings per share in its fourth financial quarter, compared to 41 cents in the same frame of 2008.

AT&T also revealed Thursday that 1 million of its new customers were from non-phone devices, like the Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook, and Sony Reader. AT&T recently struck deals with those companies to provide wireless access for the dedicated devices.

While the e-reader subscriptions helped to boost AT&T's overall total, the company lagged behind Verizon in terms of customers under contract. AT&T added 910,000 new customers under long-term deals, while Verizon acquired 1.2 million subscribers under contract. Customers on contract are far more profitable for wireless providers.

AT&T's role in the e-reader market -- with no-contract data plans -- is poised to grow even more, after Apple revealed Wednesday that its forthcoming iPad device will offer 3G access with the 9.7-inch touchscreen device. Plans will be $15 per month with a 250MB data cap, or $30 per month for unlimited data access. Both plans will come with no annual contract and can be added or canceled from the iPad at any time.

The 3G-enabled iPad will have a starting price of $629 for 16GB of storage and is expected to become available in three months. The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S.
post #2 of 35
Don't tell me - this isn't going to be another DELL (Verizon) vs APPLE (AT&T) battle - is it? LOL
May the Blue Bird of Happiness leave a deposit with you and yours.
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May the Blue Bird of Happiness leave a deposit with you and yours.
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post #3 of 35
Verizon better hurry up with that changeover to 4G... They're missing out on all that Apple goodness!

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #4 of 35
Nothing bad can come from AT&T gaining ground on Verizon. Maybe Verizon will finally open the gates to the iphone as AT&T slowly gains ground on their user base.
post #5 of 35
Why does every post continue this error:
"The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S."

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Here is some great facts from the company providing the Micro-Sims:

"3FF SIMs were developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute to fit into devices too small for a regular SIM. Where a regular SIM measures 15 millimeters x 25 mm, a 3FF SIM card measures 12mm x 15mm.

"The 3FF is a size option that's fully acceptable and supported by the industry," said Jean-Louis Carrara, vice president of business development for telecommunications, at SIM card manufacturers Gemalto North America.

Today's "regular" sim is actually the second SIM form factor, shrunken down from the SIM card's original credit-card size, Carrara said.

Carrara said that Gemalto has already shipped 3FF SIM cards to "the U.S. operators," though he declined to specify which carriers or for which devices.

"Gemalto makes it possible for all carriers worldwide to punch out a 3FF SIM ... [Steve Jobs] mentioned publicly that the device will be available in 60 days. A lot can happen in 60 days," Carrara said.

According to a press release from Lok8u Ltd., T-Mobile will begin to deploy 3FF SIM cards in Lok8u's nu-m8 wristwatch-style personal locator devices later this year.

"T-Mobile continues to invest in the development, testing and introduction of new SIM card form factors, like the micro 3FF, to directly meet the needs of these applications and enable new M2M solutions that have been hindered by traditional SIM form factors," John Horn, national director of M2M, T-Mobile USA said in a statement.

For their part, spokespeople for AT&T and T-Mobile both had no immediate comment on consumer availability of 3FF SIM cards.

Notice the bolded print: U.S. operatorS
That means more than one. More than AT&T.

Once again:
unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.
post #6 of 35
Oh yeah, the article is from PCMag.com

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2358489,00.asp

Why is PCMag getting it right while all the semi-Apple sites get it wrong?
post #7 of 35
I understand 'unlocked' for non-smart phones. but an iphone has to be both unlocked and jailbroken, doesn't it? I actually have a jailbroken iPhone that I use with AT&T. Maybe the iPad doesn't have to be jailbroken at all though... ? John Tantillo did a post on how the buzz leading up to the release of the iPad can be chalked up to Apple's strong brand (thanks to its track record of making products that people actually want and that work well). He also named Apple one of the top brand winners for 2009. I would love to see AT&T end up as a brand loser..
post #8 of 35
sloane:
Jailbroken refers to allowing you to operate without the OS constraints emplaced by Apple. For example: only being able to load apps from the app store is removed when jailbreaking. So is support.

Unlocked refers only to the Sim card-Carrier relationship. You can buy unlocked iphones insert your chosen GSM carrier's SIM card and be on your way.

Jailbreaking, I think, usually unlocks the phone as well, but with the trade off of no longer maintaining support.

You can jailbreak an i pod touch for example, even though it has no cellular aspect.

Hope that helps
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloane View Post

I understand 'unlocked' for non-smart phones. but an iphone has to be both unlocked and jailbroken, doesn't it? I actually have a jailbroken iPhone that I use with AT&T. Maybe the iPad doesn't have to be jailbroken at all though... ? John Tantillo did a post on how the buzz leading up to the release of the iPad can be chalked up to Apple's strong brand (thanks to its track record of making products that people actually want and that work well). He also named Apple one of the top brand winners for 2009. I would love to see AT&T end up as a brand loser..

Not quite, an Iphone has to be jailbroken in order to be unlocked.

On the other hand, how long do you think it will take before there is a jailbroken iPad?
post #10 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why does every post continue this error:
"The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S."

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Here is some great facts from the company providing the Micro-Sims:

"3FF SIMs were developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute to fit into devices too small for a regular SIM. Where a regular SIM measures 15 millimeters x 25 mm, a 3FF SIM card measures 12mm x 15mm.

"The 3FF is a size option that's fully acceptable and supported by the industry," said Jean-Louis Carrara, vice president of business development for telecommunications, at SIM card manufacturers Gemalto North America.

Today's "regular" sim is actually the second SIM form factor, shrunken down from the SIM card's original credit-card size, Carrara said.

Carrara said that Gemalto has already shipped 3FF SIM cards to "the U.S. operators," though he declined to specify which carriers or for which devices.

"Gemalto makes it possible for all carriers worldwide to punch out a 3FF SIM ... [Steve Jobs] mentioned publicly that the device will be available in 60 days. A lot can happen in 60 days," Carrara said.

According to a press release from Lok8u Ltd., T-Mobile will begin to deploy 3FF SIM cards in Lok8u's nu-m8 wristwatch-style personal locator devices later this year.

"T-Mobile continues to invest in the development, testing and introduction of new SIM card form factors, like the micro 3FF, to directly meet the needs of these applications and enable new M2M solutions that have been hindered by traditional SIM form factors," John Horn, national director of M2M, T-Mobile USA said in a statement.

For their part, spokespeople for AT&T and T-Mobile both had no immediate comment on consumer availability of 3FF SIM cards.

Notice the bolded print: U.S. operatorS
That means more than one. More than AT&T.

Once again:
unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Yeah thats right. Any GSM Micro-SIM.

Another thing is radio part of the device. There is only one # UMTS/HSDPA (850, 1900, 2100 MHz) operator in US - AT&T (T-Mobile uses 1700 Mhz for 3G). So that means AT&T only for 3G in US.

Althrough it could be possible to use T-Mobile GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz) for EDGE.
post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why does every post continue this error:
"The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S."

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Sure, it'll work on T-mobile but only on their GSM (GRPS & EDGE) network, same as the Nexus One. T-mobile's 3G network operates at 1700 MHz but the iPad 3G radio only operates at 850, 1900 and 2100 MHz. Apparently T-mobile also owns 2100 MHz licenses but has not (yet) deployed a network on that frequency.
Correct me if I am wrong.
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why does every post continue this error:
"The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S."

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Except... This is specifically talking about 3G network restriction not a GSM restriction. T-mobile in the US runs it's 3G signal at 1700 mHz, which is 99% likely to be incompatible with the the iPad (and is currently incompatible with all versions of the iPhone). The quote doesn't say you can't use it on T-mobile's non-3G network, you will simply be relegated to non-3G, EDGE bandwidths.
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Why does every post continue this error:
"The device will ship unlocked, but GSM-only, and only supports AT&T's wireless 3G network in the U.S."

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Here is some great facts from the company providing the Micro-Sims:

"3FF SIMs were developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute to fit into devices too small for a regular SIM. Where a regular SIM measures 15 millimeters x 25 mm, a 3FF SIM card measures 12mm x 15mm.

"The 3FF is a size option that's fully acceptable and supported by the industry," said Jean-Louis Carrara, vice president of business development for telecommunications, at SIM card manufacturers Gemalto North America.

Today's "regular" sim is actually the second SIM form factor, shrunken down from the SIM card's original credit-card size, Carrara said.

Carrara said that Gemalto has already shipped 3FF SIM cards to "the U.S. operators," though he declined to specify which carriers or for which devices.

"Gemalto makes it possible for all carriers worldwide to punch out a 3FF SIM ... [Steve Jobs] mentioned publicly that the device will be available in 60 days. A lot can happen in 60 days," Carrara said.

According to a press release from Lok8u Ltd., T-Mobile will begin to deploy 3FF SIM cards in Lok8u's nu-m8 wristwatch-style personal locator devices later this year.

"T-Mobile continues to invest in the development, testing and introduction of new SIM card form factors, like the micro 3FF, to directly meet the needs of these applications and enable new M2M solutions that have been hindered by traditional SIM form factors," John Horn, national director of M2M, T-Mobile USA said in a statement.

For their part, spokespeople for AT&T and T-Mobile both had no immediate comment on consumer availability of 3FF SIM cards.

Notice the bolded print: U.S. operatorS
That means more than one. More than AT&T.

Once again:
unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

Apple's microSIM specifically avoids using T-Mobile's bandwidth they are registered with the FCC.
post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarina View Post

Except... This is specifically talking about 3G network restriction not a GSM restriction. T-mobile in the US runs it's 3G signal at 1700 mHz, which is 99% likely to be incompatible with the the iPad (and is currently incompatible with all versions of the iPhone). The quote doesn't say you can't use it on T-mobile's non-3G network, you will simply be relegated to non-3G, EDGE bandwidths.

Let the guy fantasize. You can show people this logical limitation and they think it's a matter of swap out and not the fact that T-Mobile has a specific license at the FCC Auction they purchased which is that 1700mhz signal.
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by swtchdtomak View Post

Not quite, an Iphone has to be jailbroken in order to be unlocked.

On the other hand, how long do you think it will take before there is a jailbroken iPad?

only iphones bought in the U.S. or other single-carrier countries have to be jailbroken to be unlocked
post #16 of 35
Attention! Attention! T-Mobile is selling Cellular data devices that don't work on its own network.

http://www.t-mobile.com/shop/phones/...t-Laptop-Stick

Here are the details of this device:
Band (frequency)t850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz;UMTS: Band IV (AWS)
Communication
3G Capable
Wi-Fi Connection Management
EDGE & Wi-Fi*

Oh my gosh!!! no mention of 1700mHz. How can that be?!?
post #17 of 35
The Wall Street Journal reported that Verizon posted a fourth quarter loss and will cut another 13,000 jobs. I guess this was the "big day" Verizon was prepping for in the AI article of 1-26-10.

It's over for Verizon as far as I'm concerned in the rumor mill. I guess Steve Jobs hates Verizon like he hates Google and apparently Intel, as the iPad uses an in house chip. Reports say Jobs was involved in every detail of the iPad so I assume this includes the service provider.

I guess Mr. Jobs has never had a call drop right when he was in the middle of a conversation.
post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Verizon better hurry up with that changeover to 4G... They're missing out on all that Apple goodness!

Verizon has publicly stated that it won't roll out a 'large 4G' footprint until late 2013 or early 2014. I'm sure the other carriers are on the same schedule.

So, Verizon is stuck with CDMA for a while. They, unfortunately, will need to build a brand new parallel network. 4G and CDMA are totally separate. This is very costly. AT&T, on the other hand, just has to upgrade their line cards on their current 3G network to support 4G. Much easier.....much cheaper. Plus all 4G devices can easily fallback to 3G.

In the meantime, AT&T will go from 3.4Mb to 7.2Mb and then to 14.4Mb until the new 4G devices come out. This will help all of the 3G users today (99% of us).
post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Attention! Attention! T-Mobile is selling Cellular data devices that don't work on its own network.

http://www.t-mobile.com/shop/phones/...t-Laptop-Stick

Here are the details of this device:
Band (frequency)t850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz;UMTS: Band IV (AWS)
Communication
3G Capable
Wi-Fi Connection Management
EDGE & Wi-Fi*

Oh my gosh!!! no mention of 1700mHz. How can that be?!?

Interesting. I was about to obnoxiously point out the 1700 MHz thing.
I'll just keep my mouth shut now.
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTMP View Post

Interesting. I was about to obnoxiously point out the 1700 MHz thing.
I'll just keep my mouth shut now.

Good Morning LTMP and I hope you are enjoying the canadian winter.
What are the compatible GSM carriers in Canada?
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by noexpectations View Post

Verizon has publicly stated that it won't roll out a 'large 4G' footprint until late 2013 or early 2014. I'm sure the other carriers are on the same schedule.

So, Verizon is stuck with CDMA for a while. They, unfortunately, will need to build a brand new parallel network. 4G and CDMA are totally separate. This is very costly. AT&T, on the other hand, just has to upgrade their line cards on their current 3G network to support 4G. Much easier.....much cheaper. Plus all 4G devices can easily fallback to 3G.

In the meantime, AT&T will go from 3.4Mb to 7.2Mb and then to 14.4Mb until the new 4G devices come out. This will help all of the 3G users today (99% of us).

The problem is that despite offering better service, they will lag significantly as more devices like the Kindle, Nook, and (max)iPad come out. Single product, global reach wins for a global product. I don't think Wall St. will give them three more years to lose in this space, which will surely place them as the second largest carrier. The reality is they need to get things working faster to avoid losing their position.

AT&T is lucky to be in the opposite position. They can focus on improving 3G footprint and using that to leverage the 4G transition. Since T-Mo has the red-headed step-child frequencies for 3G, AT&T is the de-facto go-to wireless provider for non-phone devices and a lot of phones as well. I would hate to be a VZ shareholder right now. Even subsidized multi-protocol chips won't save them at this point.

Sprint is going to be interesting to watch... they need to get into the pure bandwidth business pretty soon to save themselves.
post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Attention! Attention! T-Mobile is selling Cellular data devices that don't work on its own network.

http://www.t-mobile.com/shop/phones/...t-Laptop-Stick

Here are the details of this device:
Band (frequency)t850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz;UMTS: Band IV (AWS)
Communication
3G Capable
Wi-Fi Connection Management
EDGE & Wi-Fi*

Oh my gosh!!! no mention of 1700mHz. How can that be?!?

Band IV (AWS) refers to 1700MHz UMTS. The stick is 5-band UMTS.
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTMP View Post

Interesting. I was about to obnoxiously point out the 1700 MHz thing.
I'll just keep my mouth shut now.

UMTS Band IV is 1700mHz, so you can obnoxiously point that out if you wish. Or, just point it out nicely, which is way cooler.

Edit: D'oh...aaarrrgggh beat me to it. I guess a refresh was in order.
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

Good Morning LTMP and I hope you are enjoying the canadian winter.
What are the compatible GSM carriers in Canada?

There is one - Rogers - but I think one or two others are getting into it, like Telus and Bell maybe?
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

AT&T is lucky to be in the opposite position. They can focus on improving 3G footprint and using that to leverage the 4G transition. Since T-Mo has the red-headed step-child frequencies for 3G, AT&T is the de-facto go-to wireless provider for non-phone devices and a lot of phones as well. I would hate to be a VZ shareholder right now. Even subsidized multi-protocol chips won't save them at this point.

I wonder if AT&T is rolling out 4G capable towers now where they need to improve their 3G footprint? They can see it's coming, why not just skip ahead where they are adding coverage?
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

unlocked means unlocked.
any GSM Micro-Sim means any GSM Micro-Sim.

You are assuming that the carriers will just give these micro-sims to you. The carriers are just going to sell you e-readers with their micro-sims built-in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

The problem is that despite offering better service, they will lag significantly as more devices like the Kindle, Nook, and (max)iPad come out. Single product, global reach wins for a global product. I don't think Wall St. will give them three more years to lose in this space, which will surely place them as the second largest carrier. The reality is they need to get things working faster to avoid losing their position.

But Verizon isn't really losing the subscriber war --- VZW is still pulling higher postpaid net adds than AT&T Wireless. Counting SIM cards is a dubious statistical exercise --- especially the prepaid ones.
post #27 of 35
my point was that t-mobile seems to offer 3G for the sidekick (850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz)
and
the G1 (850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz) -
stating the Capabilities: Quickly connect to the Internet via the 3G network anywhere within the T-Mobile USA 3G network."
and "3G Network and Wi-Fi access: High-speed 3G network connection for surfing the web or downloading information quickly and effortlessly or seamlessly transition to open Wi-Fi networks to surf the web or download information quickly".

So there must be some non-1700mHz T-mobile 3G network.
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by samab View Post

You are assuming that the carriers will just give these micro-sims to you. The carriers are just going to sell you e-readers with their micro-sims built-in.



But Verizon isn't really losing the subscriber war --- VZW is still pulling higher postpaid net adds than AT&T Wireless. Counting SIM cards is a dubious statistical exercise --- especially the prepaid ones.

I totally agree with you that At&t may be the only one willing to play.

If the others don't want to join in, I should blame them, not Apple or AT&T
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

UMTS Band IV is 1700mHz, so you can obnoxiously point that out if you wish. Or, just point it out nicely, which is way cooler.

Edit: D'oh...aaarrrgggh beat me to it. I guess a refresh was in order.

Don't worry about it, aaarrrgggh got me too.
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

The problem is that despite offering better service, they will lag significantly as more devices like the Kindle, Nook, and (max)iPad come out. Single product, global reach wins for a global product. I don't think Wall St. will give them three more years to lose in this space, which will surely place them as the second largest carrier. The reality is they need to get things working faster to avoid losing their position.

AT&T is lucky to be in the opposite position. They can focus on improving 3G footprint and using that to leverage the 4G transition. Since T-Mo has the red-headed step-child frequencies for 3G, AT&T is the de-facto go-to wireless provider for non-phone devices and a lot of phones as well. I would hate to be a VZ shareholder right now. Even subsidized multi-protocol chips won't save them at this point.

Sprint is going to be interesting to watch... they need to get into the pure bandwidth business pretty soon to save themselves.

That's good to know. I assumed SJ was sticking with AT&T for good reasons. I wonder if Apple might not invest in AT&T to help the process forward?
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Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

my point was that t-mobile seems to offer 3G for the sidekick (850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz)
and
the G1 (850 MHz;900 MHz;1800 MHz;1900 MHz) -
stating the Capabilities: Quickly connect to the Internet via the 3G network anywhere within the T-Mobile USA 3G network."
and "3G Network and Wi-Fi access: High-speed 3G network connection for surfing the web or downloading information quickly and effortlessly or seamlessly transition to open Wi-Fi networks to surf the web or download information quickly".

So there must be some non-1700mHz T-mobile 3G network.

The frequencies you list for the sidekick are the 2G frequency set; both the Sidekick and G1 have a standard quadband 2G GSM radio baseband. 3G frequencies are in similar bands, but use a very different over the air encoding. There are about 14 3G or UMTS frequencies in use. You will see them listed either by band number or by frequency. T-Mobile 3G devices are usually UMTS band 1, 4, and 8. - Bands 1 and 8 used in Europe and Asia, band 4 is unique to T-mobile in the US.This makes sense as T-Mobile is as subsidiary of Deutch Telecom, and they want the phones to work in Europe on their network there. As far as I know, T-Mobile has no infrastructure on 3G bands 2 or 5 in the US.

Devices sold by ATT or for ATT normally contain the standard 2G quadband plus UMTS 1, 2, and 5. Band 1 allows use in Europe, while bands 2, and 5 are used by ATT in the US. The iPad has this set of bands, so does 3G only on ATT in the US (Rogers in Canada).

To have complete 3G coverage, you would need a transmitter/receiver pair for all allocated UMTS frequencies - but this is not practical due to battery size, phone size, and antenna requirements. To cover most countries and GSM service providers, you would need at a minimum a band 1, 2, 4, 5, 8 phone. We are about to get some practical chips that could do this at a reasonable price, but they are not available today.

However, note that there is not a lot of demand for five band phone. Most people only use a phone on a single carrier. The real push comes from having fewer stock keeping units and production lines for manufacturers. Effectively, the cost savings from lower manufacturing cost has to out weigh the addition cost to design and build a five band device. The trade off of more bands is shorter battery life. US Carriers of course really do not like the idea of a device that can be trivially ported to another carrier, hence the incredible Balkanization of the US market. Carriers will probably prevent most manufacturers from offering such a device in the US.

My guess is Apple will be the first, as there is only one customer that matters to Apple - Steve Jobs. A five band iPhone and iPad would fit well with his idea of "it just works."

Please do not underestimate the amount of work it takes to create a cell phone; if you really knew how difficult it is, you would be amazed that we can get them to work at all.
post #32 of 35
what about Cincinnati Bell Wireless (was 20% cingular, but now independent). They offer 3G for the Cincinnati metro area.
post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

what about Cincinnati Bell Wireless (was 20% cingular, but now independent). They offer 3G for the Cincinnati metro area.

Cincinnati Bell Wireless runs it's 3G service in the same frequency as T-mobile, 1700 mHz.
post #34 of 35
But T-mobile also has
"3G upgrade
In September 2006, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) offered, at auction, licenses in the first Advanced Wireless Services band. This band was an area of wireless spectrum, half in the 1700 MHz (1.7 GHz) and half in the 2100 MHz (2.1 GHz) frequencies...T-Mobile gained nationwide coverage of 1.7 GHz and 2.1 GHz, with numerous areas being supplemented with addition licenses. Examples include New York City, Chicago, and Boston where T-Mobile acquired one-third (33%) of the available spectrum, or San Francisco, Houston, and Miami where they acquired 45% of the available spectrum.[1}"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-Mobile_(USA)

and the ipad does support 2100mHz.
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by estyle View Post

But T-mobile also has
"3G upgrade
In September 2006, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) offered, at auction, licenses in the first Advanced Wireless Services band. This band was an area of wireless spectrum, half in the 1700 MHz (1.7 GHz) and half in the 2100 MHz (2.1 GHz) frequencies...T-Mobile gained nationwide coverage of 1.7 GHz and 2.1 GHz, with numerous areas being supplemented with addition licenses. Examples include New York City, Chicago, and Boston where T-Mobile acquired one-third (33%) of the available spectrum, or San Francisco, Houston, and Miami where they acquired 45% of the available spectrum.[1}"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-Mobile_(USA)

and the ipad does support 2100mHz.

It means that AWS has the uplink and downlink channels in separate spectrum space --- i.e. uplink at 1700 MHz and downlink at 2100 MHz. It means that normal 3G phones cannot function on the T-Mobile network.
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