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iPad iBooks app US-only, McGraw-Hill absent from Apple event - Page 2

post #41 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by MobileMe View Post

So this article is simply stating that, since the CEO McGraw-Hill prematurely divulged what OS the iPad would be running during his interview (with the BEAUTIFUL ERIN BURNETT) on CNBC, Jobs in-return decided to omit the company during the keynote presentation as a type of reprove measure for that fortuitous slip up???

It's happened this way before. ATI once did something similar, and Time once let the lampshade iMac story run a day before the SteveNote. Both were absent from the keynote.

Bottom line, Apple expects you to honor your NDA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Right. I don´t understand this reluctance to open up to other markets. What does ready mean anyway?

Like music, each book publisher cuts a separate deal for each country they distribute to. That's not Apple's fault; it's the right of each sovereign country to have their own systems for royalties and distribution contracts.

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post #42 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

Maybe because the reception has been lukewarm?

Oh god, here we go again.
This product is going to kick ass once people get it into their hands at the stores in April.
The only ones who hate it will be people expecting it to be a touch-based desktop.
For that, get a crapbook or any of the soon-to-follow Windows hack jobs that try to shim keyboard/mouse interfaces with glued-on touch.
post #43 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifail View Post

The hype was astronomical around it, and it failed to deliver.

And Apple is responsible for that hype... how? And why would Apple be responsible for fulfilling techie wet dreams that had no basis in reality?
Even after the iPhone reveal, AAPL jumped 10 during the presentation and fell off right after.
This is normal AAPL behavior (to a large degree manipulated) and says nothing about acceptance or rejection of the iPad.
post #44 of 96
www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6671756.html

2008 Largest US Based Publishers

McGraw-Hill $2.7B
Scholastic\t $2.2B
John Wiley\t $1.7B
**HarperCollins $1.4B\t
Reader's Digest\t $1.1B
**Simon & Schuster\t$0.9B
Marvel\t $0.4B
Perseus Books Group $0.3B
post #45 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In unveiling its new iBook application and iBookstore for the iPad, Apple highlighted a number of publishers with which it has content agreements. But those deals, for now, are U.S.-only, and one glaring omission stood out from the list: McGraw-Hill.

Apple has begun launching international Web sites to promote the iPad, and the Australian page comes with a small footnote that reads: "iBooks available in the U.S. only."

Before Apple can make iBooks available in any country, it has to have books to sell. To do so, it has to make deals with the respective publishers in the respective country.

For example,
Quote:
Penguin Group (Canada) distributes many titles from the Penguin Group, including Penguin Group (USA) and Penguin Books Ltd. (UK). We can grant permissions only on titles that are part of our domestic publishing program, i.e., that are published under the following imprints: Viking Canada, Penguin Canada, Puffin Canada, and Hamish Hamilton Canada. The easiest way to tell whether a book is published by Penguin Group (Canada) is to look for our imprint logos on the inside title page, or at the bottom corner of the back jacket flap. If the book is not published by Penguin Group (Canada), you must contact the appropriate [country] Penguin office for permission.


Apple just can't make a deal with a publisher in the US and unilaterally provide it in another country without 'permission'. Like the music industry, each country has their own copyright, domestic/international rights, royalty splits, etc., laws and regulations for consideration. In addition, there is the issue of sales/payments that each respective local publisher in which each independent country would demand participation.
post #46 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

Hell hath no fury like a pissed off Steve Jobs!

Hey TS ...I would say welcome back ... except my heart wouldn't be in it. Also, judging from your posts under your "new" name, it seems your tagline is wrong ... instead of new and improved it should read ... old and same old.
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post #47 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

Hey TS ...I would say welcome back ... except my heart wouldn't be in it. Also, judging from your posts under your "new" name, it seems your tagline is wrong ... instead of new and improved it should read ... old and same old.

You sound very addle-pated
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post #48 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

Hey TS ...I would say welcome back ... except my heart wouldn't be in it. Also, judging from your posts under your "new" name, it seems your tagline is wrong ... instead of new and improved it should read ... old and same old.

You must be all upset cause I used the word "new". \
post #49 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

i think the reason for no McGraw/Hill is basically because MH didn't buy into the iPad concept at launch. I think that guy was trying to toot his proverbial horn even though his company hadn't yet adopted the business model. Perhaps because they wanted to see the reaction to the iPad before spending the time and money into it. I'm guessing more publishers will come after the iPad goes on said and we start to see real numbers. Kind of like the Kindle.

The real questions we should ask here are:
1. will iBooks be available to the rest of the world anytime soon?
2. Will iBooks App be available for download on the iPhone/Touch?
3. What will they cost? We've heard rumor that they will be between $12-$15 each. Amazon sells for around $9.99 and less.
4. Will other e-book formats be supported on the iPad?

Amazon already has a really strong lead on Apple. If they want to start competing, they need an edge that Amazon doesn't. Amazon already has an App for the kindle on the iPhone and Touch. So i'd safely say the Kindle Store is up +2 already.


There are a lot of open source ibookse.g. Gutenberg project. Also many librairies aoffer downloadable ebooks some of which will run on ipod and many of which run on PCs. These are free but only allow 3-4 weeks use. Some libraries alos offer audio books for free. Question is "compatibility". I would prefer this route as I seldom buy books. Mostly get them form the library. Also I have the 2200 short story app to read on the bus. Mostly classics that I never read as a youth and a good source fo reading for your kids.
post #50 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

i think the reason for no McGraw/Hill is basically because MH didn't buy into the iPad concept at launch. I think that guy was trying to toot his proverbial horn even though his company hadn't yet adopted the business model. Perhaps because they wanted to see the reaction to the iPad before spending the time and money into it. I'm guessing more publishers will come after the iPad goes on said and we start to see real numbers. Kind of like the Kindle.

The real questions we should ask here are:
1. will iBooks be available to the rest of the world anytime soon?
2. Will iBooks App be available for download on the iPhone/Touch?
3. What will they cost? We've heard rumor that they will be between $12-$15 each. Amazon sells for around $9.99 and less.
4. Will other e-book formats be supported on the iPad?

Amazon already has a really strong lead on Apple. If they want to start competing, they need an edge that Amazon doesn't. Amazon already has an App for the kindle on the iPhone and Touch. So i'd safely say the Kindle Store is up +2 already.


It's entirely possible that they are way behind on negotiations with the neccessary parties in other countries, because they rushed to secure US availability for a spring launch and/or wanted to keep the project a bit more secret (fail). I'm guessing the former.
post #51 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by petertemplar View Post

Random House (15.9% market share)
*Pearson (Penguin) (11%)
*HarperCollins (10.6%)
*Simon & Schuster (9.3%)
*Hachette (6.2%)
Scholastic (5.2%)
Thomas Nelson (4.7%)
Holtzbrinck (4.4%)
Tyndale House (1.9%)
Wiley (1.9%)

So Random House is really the missing piece of the puzzle.

Indeed. Puts the lack of McGraw Hill into perspective. They probably weren't mentioned because they are not that big.

No. That list (Holtzbrinck is Apple's 5th * because Holtzbrinck owns Macmillan) is only for sales thru retail booksellers. It does not include textbooks. Which, along with reference books, is all McGraw-Hill publishes.
post #52 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

You must be all upset cause I used the word "new". \

not upset, just disappointed ... been watching your posts, knowing you can do so much better ... but not seeing it, kinda like you and iPad.
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post #53 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccamsAftershave View Post

No. That list (Holtzbrinck is Apple's 5th * because Holtzbrinck owns MacMillen) is only for sales thru retail booksellers. It does not include textbooks. Which, along with reference books, is all McGraw-Hill publishes.

I see - thanks for the clarification.
post #54 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by MobileMe View Post

You sound very addle-pated

wow, there's a word you don't see every day ... with good reason.
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post #55 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

And Apple is responsible for that hype... how? And why would Apple be responsible for fulfilling techie wet dreams that had no basis in reality?
Even after the iPhone reveal, AAPL jumped 10 during the presentation and fell off right after.
This is normal AAPL behavior (to a large degree manipulated) and says nothing about acceptance or rejection of the iPad.

You can blame sites like AI and Wallstreet Journal, Times, Engadget, and practically everyone else who writes on technology for that. The blogeratti had what they envisioned the product to be, every analyst who was thinking this device was the second coming of the ten commandments and that VZW would be getting the iPhone (this will leak well before it happens TRUST ME, VZW cant keep anything secret).

Most stockholders could have easily been underwhelmed by the showing, considering what the media was spouting off (99% was rehash and in the dark guessing) the device could do and what Apple would be announcing. There is no way they would be immune to it, it was everywhere.

Its not Apples fault, but the lofty expectations from the iPhone platform had set the standard for this device.
post #56 of 96
McGraw-Hill CEO Terry McGraw was touting the MHP stock price when asked the question of the Ipad product. Since most money comes from the financial side of the house, the education market has a longer timeline to get their profit$$$$.

Not having MHP there is not a snub but more a "wait and see" approach of where the Ipad fits in its business model. I think if the Ipad becomes a more enterprise worthy hardware that being a good citizen, it will be a better impacting device than just adding an IPhone to these environments.

If MS Office (Mactopia) makes a "lite" version of the 2010 product, this will be the game-changer to bring this prosumer hardware to the Fortune 500 worlds.

IMO

M--
post #57 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlynC View Post

This REALLY sucks. I was all for the iPad before they decided that the UK doesn't want to read. Nutters.

I bet they'll use the excuse that "the UK market isn't ready yet" which is rubbish. It's they who aren't ready.

Oh for heaven's sake, it's the problem of having to negotiate non-US rights to books, not any lack of faith in the British reader. It's a problem for all US-based ebook stores and Apple is no different. Amazon's Kindle store has only just recently become available outside the US and Canada, and many books are still not available to non-US/Canada residents. Same with every other ebook store from B&N to Fictionwise.

It was months and months after the iTunes music store opened in the US before it became available in the UK, Australia and other places, and there's still quite a bit of content that's not available in all places at the same time. It's going to take a long time to get the iBook store available outside the USA/Canada axis, probably 6-12 months of lawyers, agents and endless negotiations. Heck, the print industry is worse than music and films because it's older and more fragmented and depends on more creators than they do, and they all have their own agents!

Music, film and print publishing are not exactly into the whole internet vibe of borderless selling and digital downloads in case you haven't noticed! These 19th and 20th century industries still cling to all sorts of weird and arcane rules and geographic separation of rights which unfortunately can't simply be swept away by the Jobs reality distortion field. sadly it's going to take a while, but I'm sure they'll get there in the end.
post #58 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacAdict View Post

US only is ridiculous! you have the app store everywhere, how is an e-book store different?

That's the wrong comparison. It's more correct to compare with the iTMS. There's a lot of pain in the butt negotiations and horse-wrangling that has to go on. They're making an electronic store for stuff which already has contracts in place designed for a different kind of media.
post #59 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlynC View Post

This REALLY sucks. I was all for the iPad before they decided that the UK doesn't want to read. Nutters.

I bet they'll use the excuse that "the UK market isn't ready yet" which is rubbish. It's they who aren't ready.

More likely that, like the music publishing business, distribution is regionally divided up. They'll have to work with local branches to distribute.

Patience, grasshopper.
post #60 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!

Simple, it's the usual "silver lining" analysts effect.

As in, given the unrealistic expectations raised by pre-announcement hype (generated by people who had no idea of what the real product would be), no product could possibly rise to the hype.

Or, "every silver lining has a dark cloud".
post #61 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

Maybe because the reception has been lukewarm?

A lot like the initial iPod or iPhone reception.

And we know that those were dismal marketplace failures.

post #62 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by macgold55 View Post

McGraw-Hill CEO Terry McGraw was touting the MHP stock price when asked the question of the Ipad product. Since most money comes from the financial side of the house, the education market has a longer timeline to get their profit$$$$.

Not having MHP there is not a snub but more a "wait and see" approach of where the Ipad fits in its business model. I think if the Ipad becomes a more enterprise worthy hardware that being a good citizen, it will be a better impacting device than just adding an IPhone to these environments.

If MS Office (Mactopia) makes a "lite" version of the 2010 product, this will be the game-changer to bring this prosumer hardware to the Fortune 500 worlds.

IMO

M--

Couldn't agree with you more. However i think Apple is (probably deliberately) not addressing the concerns of the business world with the iPad. My guess is they are kind of taking the same approach as the iPhone. Problem i see is that the Business World was ready to jump all over the iPhone when it first arrived. It took the 3G for them to finally get thier due.

One would have thought that given the Business World's eager adoption of the iPhone, Apple would have prepared for this in the iPad launch and make it also more business frinedly. But perhpas SJ doesn't think this device would be useful in Business and Education, which i think he's dead wrong about that. See my previous posts for more info on how i think they could benefit.

Serious oversight to think Business and Education would not benefit greatly!
post #63 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Probably a snub at the event for breaking the non-disclosure but I doubt Apple would literally drop them as it would lose them revenue.

Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!

As a long time shareholder and Apple observer I can tell you that this is quite normal. I can always bank on the fact that the better the news, the bigger the hit on stock price. Actually, this time was the exception: the price actually made a small gain both on Monday (earnings) and on new product announcement day. I'll leave it to more technical stock specialists to explain why Apple almost always goes down on such occasions.
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post #64 of 96
post #65 of 96
So let me get this straight, for non US customers, this is an ebook reader with no ebooks.

And I thought the lack of multi-tasking, flash, USB ports, and a webcam were bad enough.

Sorry Apple, this is a massive flop in the making.
post #66 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveH View Post

A lot like the initial iPod or iPhone reception.

And we know that those were dismal marketplace failures.


Why do you say that? The iPhone was considered truly revolutionary and had lines wrapped around Madison Ave when it was released. This is considered derivative and remains to be seen how well it should sell upon release.
The iPod again was not welcomed lukewarm but was considered truly innovative and a remarkable device. Except for its high price at the time it received glowing reviews.
post #67 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Before Apple can make iBooks available in any country, it has to have books to sell. To do so, it has to make deals with the respective publishers in the respective country.

For example,


Apple just can't make a deal with a publisher in the US and unilaterally provide it in another country without 'permission'. Like the music industry, each country has their own copyright, domestic/international rights, royalty splits, etc., laws and regulations for consideration. In addition, there is the issue of sales/payments that each respective local publisher in which each independent country would demand participation.

This is like Apple not making the iTunes application available in certain countries because a particular record label does not sell music in that country. Does this mean that only those large publishers that Apple listed get to create ebooks for this application? Are free, public domain books not going to be available for iBooks? I suppose other developers could create their own reader, but Apple might reject it because it "duplicates functionality", functionality which other countries don't even get to use in the first place.
post #68 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by dshan View Post

Oh for heaven's sake, it's the problem of having to negotiate non-US rights to books, not any lack of faith in the British reader. It's a problem for all US-based ebook stores and Apple is no different. Amazon's Kindle store has only just recently become available outside the US and Canada, and many books are still not available to non-US/Canada residents. Same with every other ebook store from B&N to Fictionwise.

It was months and months after the iTunes music store opened in the US before it became available in the UK, Australia and other places, and there's still quite a bit of content that's not available in all places at the same time. It's going to take a long time to get the iBook store available outside the USA/Canada axis, probably 6-12 months of lawyers, agents and endless negotiations. Heck, the print industry is worse than music and films because it's older and more fragmented and depends on more creators than they do, and they all have their own agents!

Music, film and print publishing are not exactly into the whole internet vibe of borderless selling and digital downloads in case you haven't noticed! These 19th and 20th century industries still cling to all sorts of weird and arcane rules and geographic separation of rights which unfortunately can't simply be swept away by the Jobs reality distortion field. sadly it's going to take a while, but I'm sure they'll get there in the end.

Good post and absolutely right. I'd only add that music publishers were prodded by watching their royalties disappear through P2P. They jumped for iTunes rather than go under. But book publishers don't really have that cattle prod. And they are all completely obsessed with their own importance, in my experience. Winning them over in all territories will be difficult and one hill at a time: they won't want their importance to be diminished one jot!
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post #69 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by macgold55 View Post

McGraw-Hill CEO Terry McGraw was touting the MHP stock price when asked the question of the Ipad product. Since most money comes from the financial side of the house, the education market has a longer timeline to get their profit$$$$.

Not having MHP there is not a snub but more a "wait and see" approach of where the Ipad fits in its business model. I think if the Ipad becomes a more enterprise worthy hardware that being a good citizen, it will be a better impacting device than just adding an IPhone to these environments.

If MS Office (Mactopia) makes a "lite" version of the 2010 product, this will be the game-changer to bring this prosumer hardware to the Fortune 500 worlds.

IMO

M--

Welcome Terry McGraw!
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post #70 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

Couldn't agree with you more. However i think Apple is (probably deliberately) not addressing the concerns of the business world with the iPad. My guess is they are kind of taking the same approach as the iPhone. Problem i see is that the Business World was ready to jump all over the iPhone when it first arrived. It took the 3G for them to finally get thier due.

One would have thought that given the Business World's eager adoption of the iPhone, Apple would have prepared for this in the iPad launch and make it also more business frinedly. But perhpas SJ doesn't think this device would be useful in Business and Education, which i think he's dead wrong about that. See my previous posts for more info on how i think they could benefit.

Serious oversight to think Business and Education would not benefit greatly!

I think this is wrong. This is a device with the U.S. college student firmly in mind. Other countries will follow, depending on when the publishers get on board.

One question I haven't seen addressed: if a book is in pdf form will the iPad be able to read it? I'm assuming that even if this isn't the default format that it would be an easy functionality for a third party developer to add.
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post #71 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

This is like Apple not making the iTunes application available in certain countries because a particular record label does not sell music in that country. Does this mean that only those large publishers that Apple listed get to create ebooks for this application? Are free, public domain books not going to be available for iBooks? I suppose other developers could create their own reader, but Apple might reject it because it "duplicates functionality", functionality which other countries don't even get to use in the first place.

Until Apple can negotiate with a music or book publisher(s) in a country, it would be ludicrous to open their store in that country. Each country is handled and negotiated independently. It is long and tedious work.

Can't see why it would be restricted to large publishers. After all, Apple does sell music for independent labels on its iTunes store.
post #72 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

So let me get this straight, for non US customers, this is an ebook reader with no ebooks.

And I thought the lack of multi-tasking, flash, USB ports, and a webcam were bad enough.

Sorry Apple, this is a massive flop in the making.

Congratulations, you have won the award for the most idiotic post EVER. FYI, All countries have their own laws and regulations and book deals will have to be negotiated individually ... but they will get done ... just like they did for music and movies.

As for "a massive flop in the making" I think your post already took that award too.
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post #73 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

It's happened this way before. ATI once did something similar, and Time once let the lampshade iMac story run a day before the SteveNote. Both were absent from the keynote.

Bottom line, Apple expects you to honor your NDA.


Like music, each book publisher cuts a separate deal for each country they distribute to. That's not Apple's fault; it's the right of each sovereign country to have their own systems for royalties and distribution contracts.

That's not the point. There are many countries comply with standards far higher than the US standard. In fact you mention music and as far as I know the iTunes Music Store (before it became the iTunes Store) worked just fine with many other countries, considering there are much more music labels out there. I guess publishers are more difficult to deal with. The Kindle had the same problem, and they first came out with a list of 100 countries that was later expanded. I don't see why Apple can't do the same.
post #74 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by dshan View Post

Oh for heaven's sake, it's the problem of having to negotiate non-US rights to books, not any lack of faith in the British reader. It's a problem for all US-based ebook stores and Apple is no different. Amazon's Kindle store has only just recently become available outside the US and Canada, and many books are still not available to non-US/Canada residents. Same with every other ebook store from B&N to Fictionwise.

It was months and months after the iTunes music store opened in the US before it became available in the UK, Australia and other places, and there's still quite a bit of content that's not available in all places at the same time. It's going to take a long time to get the iBook store available outside the USA/Canada axis, probably 6-12 months of lawyers, agents and endless negotiations. Heck, the print industry is worse than music and films because it's older and more fragmented and depends on more creators than they do, and they all have their own agents!

Music, film and print publishing are not exactly into the whole internet vibe of borderless selling and digital downloads in case you haven't noticed! These 19th and 20th century industries still cling to all sorts of weird and arcane rules and geographic separation of rights which unfortunately can't simply be swept away by the Jobs reality distortion field. sadly it's going to take a while, but I'm sure they'll get there in the end.

Don't forget that Kindle was launched in the US AND 100 other countries at the same time. In other words, these same publishers have already figured out their internal mess for all these countries. So therefore it shouldn't be long before iBooks can be launched internationally. I am hoping this is done before iPad becomes available.
post #75 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

not upset, just disappointed ... been watching your posts, knowing you can do so much better ... but not seeing it, kinda like you and iPad.

Oh so you 're not into the Supersized Touch much either? Are we on the same page?
post #76 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!

And that's why people shouldn't trade.
post #77 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

So let me get this straight, for non US customers, this is an ebook reader with no ebooks.

And I thought the lack of multi-tasking, flash, USB ports, and a webcam were bad enough.

Sorry Apple, this is a massive flop in the making.

It's not just an e-book reader. In any case even if there were no iBooks' store available you would be able to buy epub books and read them. Apple has wisely adopted that standard and in Canada at least there are more books than you could ever hope to read available now.

What you are worrying about has to do with distribution rights. The Kindle is sold in Canada. But, even though we buy our books from the kindle store in the US there are books that are not available in kindle format for Canadians. In additions even free books cost $2 ( a hidden cost of their "free" 3G Kindle connection). The same problem exists with Sony's e-readers and store.

Geez, given the recent prominence of the opponents to globalization you'd think that people would realize the difficulties introduced by sovereignty over local matters.

As for MS-Office brought up earlier, are we never going to get away from Visicalc? For goodness sakes, can't we move into the future with really new things and not base our whole models on World, Excel, Exchange, etc...? We might as well go back to the abacus.

philip
post #78 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Don't forget that Kindle was launched in the US AND 100 other countries at the same time. In other words, these same publishers have already figured out their internal mess for all these countries. So therefore it shouldn't be long before iBooks can be launched internationally. I am hoping this is done before iPad becomes available.

The Kindle only recently became available in Canada and there are many restrictions. It took one year for the iPhone to sell up here. This is not a matter of an internal mess. It has to do with the notion of sovereignty which most people (not I) support.

philip
post #79 of 96
So basically the CEO of McGraw-Hill pulled his dick out of his pants, to impress Erin Burnett, and say, "Yo, check this out baby, Imma all down and in on the iPad, yeahhh...."

Following which his PR/legal team was like, *facepalm*, "Oh, not again, FFS, not AGAIN..!!!!"

Merely speculative? Bollocks.

Nice try though, I guess McGraw-Hill's PR/legal team gotta do what they gotta do...
post #80 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

The Kindle only recently became available in Canada and there are many restrictions. It took one year for the iPhone to sell up here. This is not a matter of an internal mess. It has to do with the notion of sovereignty which most people (not I) support.

philip

Again, traditional media companies are seeing their physical media profits obliterate in front of their eyes and still deny the obvious desire for common, global standards and availability.

I am actually surprised book publishers won't even do a standard US, Canada, UK+Europe thing for English books. Just US only. *Sigh*

HAVE YOU NOT LEARNED ANYTHING FROM THE MUSIC AND MOVIE INDUSTRY CRUMBLING IN FRONT OF YOU, OH MIGHTY BOOK PUBLISHERS OF WHICH PEOPLE READING PHYSICAL BOOKS IS NOT EXACTLY A GROWTH AREA?

Well, that's why I have an iTunes US Account.
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