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iPad debut ignites price war between Amazon and publisher Macmillan - Page 2

post #41 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonQG View Post

I don't know where you get your books, but I usually see new hardcovers for $12-15. Nobody ever seems to sell them for MSRP.


I can't believe that people are defending Apple for undoing all the good work Amazon has done for consumers. I like Apple and I love my Macs, iPods, and iPhone, but because of this and other anti-consumer issues, I wish the iPad didn't exist.

Where, other than Costco, where they sell cheaper versions of hardcovers (book club editions) as loss leaders? New hardcovers usually go for $17, or a bit higher.

You also know that right now, Amazon is losing several dollars on every "hardcover" they sell.
post #42 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

yes
apple was tricked into doing this bad thing

bad people

Bruce, I'm surprised at you, you should know better than all this. An author must get their royalty, at the very least. After advances are paid off, it can be as high as 25% of the list of the book. The publisher rarely makes any money at all on the hardcover until after it's sold tens of thousands of copies, and then, not so much until it goes to over 100 thousand.

Almost no books sell in those numbers. Most wind up losing money for the publisher, and make very little for the author. It's the few bestsellers that pay for most of the others being published. It's sad, but true.

It costs less than some think to actually make a book, ship it, and take back and destroy unsold copies. Maybe 25% of the hardcovers selling price at $17 to $20.
post #43 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

I don't "hang out", i actually multi-task and do other things while this website is up on my computer. While multi-tasking may seem strange to you and many others on here now because you will always cede to whatever Apple dictates what you should and shouldn't like.
As for me . I enjoy reading many of the threads here, many are informative and some entertaining. And believe it or not I corresponded with many fellow posters on here that share many of my views and I theirs and are open to discus many topics without bias.
And since when was hypocrisy ever a good thing? Why do you defend that concept?

Tek, you ARE biased. You can't pretend you're not, and then say that others are.
post #44 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

How do Kindle prices compare, in general, to paperback prices? In theory, Kindle should be cheaper than paperback which is cheaper than hardcover.

I believe my Star Trek paper backs are close to the same price on the Kindle.

One thing everyone needs to remember is I have internet (albeit very limited) access via the Kindle that I don't pay a monthly fee.
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post #45 of 103
I have no problem paying a measly $15.00 for an eBook. The arguments make about as much sense and expecting a Picasso for the price of canvas and paint. The value is the content, not the delivery method. I can't wait to get an iPad.

No one seems to complain about spending an equal amount for a movie or other entertainment. Why all the complaining? If the book is too expensive for you then don't buy it---go to the library and borrow it instead.
post #46 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

I don't "hang out", i actually multi-task and do other things while this website is up on my computer. While multi-tasking may seem strange to you and many others on here now because you will always cede to whatever Apple dictates what you should and shouldn't like.
As for me . I enjoy reading many of the threads here, many are informative and some entertaining. And believe it or not I corresponded with many fellow posters on here that share many of my views and I theirs and are open to discus many topics without bias.
And since when was hypocrisy ever a good thing? Why do you defend that concept?

Stop working yourself up into a lather by having a conversation with yourself (glad to see that you're finally posting beyond your obligatory three words).

And, get real. You're not the only one that 'multitasks.'

And, while you're at it: (i) Grow up; (ii) Get a life.
post #47 of 103
Did you guys forget that the Kindle allows for wireless download of new books. I also think I read that they give you WikiPedia access on some of the units. Sure, that's a relatively low bandwidth application, but there is still a wireless service provider that needs to get paid. I don't see how the eBook will be priced the same on Amazon as it will be in the iBook store.

Visit my Facebook iPad fan site and post some comments:
http://theIPADisAwesome.com
post #48 of 103
Amazon blinking means, of course,
that they are no longer the only game in town.

They are really taking the iPad as a serious threat.

All arguements aside on how great or not the iPad is,
and all arguements aside on how good or bad backlighting
is for an e-reader and your eyes. -
It's a safe bet the iPad will far outsell whatever volume
the one-trick pony Kindle sees.
Regardless if those sales are initially for the e-reader capability,
Amazon knows they will most likely lose any associated
ebook sale once a consumer has an iPad on thier lap instead of a kindle.

They had no choice but to concede to the publisher.
post #49 of 103
Over on the Amazon.com Kindle forums, the Kindle users are falling at the feet of Bezos, saying how they are going to boycott Macmillan books (as if "Macmillan" was an author) and fantasizing about Bezos and AMZN going into the indie publishing business (as if Amazon got into ANY business that required the kind of care and feeding of thousands of authors for potentially no payback). Worth browsing in your spare time, if only for laughs:

http://bit.ly/9zehXS

The best part is when the "Amazon Kindle Team" (whoever that is) says:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazon Kindle Team

...we will have to capitulate and accept Macmillan's terms because Macmillan has a monopoly over their own titles...

Uh, yeah, that "monopoly" is called a publishing contract and it sets the terms of the agreement between the publisher and author, including giving the publisher exclusive distribution rights. It works the same for every publishing company that sells books to Amazon. If the "Amazon Kindle Team" hasn't figured out how that works by now, they must not be ready to go into the indie publishing business any time soon.

If nothing else, they certainly have the Kindle faithful lathered up!

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post #50 of 103
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #51 of 103
Originally Posted by FineTunes
Shame on Amazon. While I don't necessarily agree with the pricing of eBooks, just because there is a dispute on what a publisher wants for a book, it is not right of Amazon to deny their customers the right to get a Macm book from Amazon or Kindle. The market will bear what price people are willing to pay to get an eBook or hard copy. If publishers want more for new books and if they pass this on to the authors, then it is only right that a new book should get a higher price. If you go to a bookstore, you would pay more for a just released novel. You as a consumer can decide to wait until the price comes down and buy the book three or four months later. Suppose that Borders or any other retailer decides not to carry ANY books of a publisher because of a pricing issue on a new book--almost borders on censorship. It would have been more reasonable if Amazon told Macm we won't increase the price so you have the option of not listing any new books with us or you can allow us to list them at our agreed to price; but to remove all Macm books that is just plain shameful.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

If your running a business and your supplier just raised their prices 133%, you surely can deny carrying their products if it doesn't bother making your business worthwhile.

You see, Amazon is selling Kindles, in order to justify buying a expensive device the customer has to realize a benefit over traditional books which look a heck of a lot nicer on a shelf and can be resold.

If the e-content prices are too high, adoption is going to be quite low and not many Kindles will be sold and the whole concept of e-books will just die off.

Publishers have a interest in e-books because it cuts their costs in half over traditional books, the lower they set their prices, the more volume they will have and possibly more total revenue.

Right now the publishers feel that they can set their prices higher and if they realize lost total revenue, they then can place certain books "on sale" to generate higher volume.

However the e-book thing is rather a instant thing, people buy a device because they want what they want right now, instead of the traditional browsing in the bookstore.

I think it would be a good thing for the publishers to study the concept of renting their e-books, this would appeal to a very very large audience and possible make more in total revenue than buying.

With a device like a Kindle or a iPad, the content can be snatched off the device after a certain time period, unlike a traditional book.

You kind of missed the point. It was wrong of Amazon to remove all of Macm listings from the Kindle and the Amazon on-line store just because they could not agree on the price of new releases. The consumer should be the one who chooses what to pay for a book. e-books are cheaper than traditional books so you still get any book cheaper. New releases are generally higher and come down in price after a few months. The consumer can choose when to buy the book and at what price. If you have to have it now, then you will have to pay more. Will Amazon do likewise with other publishers who don't fall in line? If you check the Kindle store, you will find some books that sell for more than $9.99, they are still cheaper than the real book price.

As for your argument that Amazon is in business to sell Kindles, then if you have a issue on price, just remove the listings from the Kindle store and not all of Amazon. Amazon is flexible what they are willing to pay publishers. As pointed out in other postings, Amazon just prior to the iPads release, renegotiated most of the contracts with publishers giving them a better deal.

"I think it would be a good thing for the publishers to study the concept of renting their e-books, this would appeal to a very very large audience and possible make more in total revenue than buying."

Bad idea. When I pay for something I only want to pay for it once and I like to own it. Like buying a CD or a book. If I want to rent something, for a book, I go to the library, for a DVD block Busters or the like.

"With a device like a Kindle or a iPad, the content can be snatched off the device after a certain time period, unlike a traditional book."

Wasn't Amazon who removed or "snatched" the some content from their Kindle after customers paid for the e-book????? One was a student who lost all of his work and sued Amazon--they did pay for the cost of the book--but the work was lost. Again SHAME !!!!!
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #52 of 103
What a disgrace. Apple are saying publishers should be able to set their own prices (OK, good), but then saying they expect prices to be around a certain price (to drive a revenue base).

As someone else said, it smacks of price-fixing. It's also hypocritical.

With these kind of turf wars and a series of mixed messages coming out (especially from the intermediary's who are starting to sound like old fashioned monopolists) it's easily enough for consumers to lose confidence in the e-book model at all.

Way to go guys. Remember the old MP3/DRM fights you had back then amongst yourselves and between your customers, well this is the same old crap served on us consumers that you expect us to accept again. Good luck with that.
post #53 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Strawman.

Amazon hasn't done good work for consumers, Amazon is doing good work for Amazon.

From the above linked blog post from an author (bold is mine, for emphasis):


If this is true (and I have no reason to believe it's not), then I think Amazon is about to get some of that down-home DOJ lovin'...

It is true and the reason I would never let Amazon be my publisher.
post #54 of 103
The problem is there's actually no debut at all. There was an announcement. Come see the debut in 50 days.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #55 of 103
Amazon has caved in - but, of course you all new that, didn't you?

"Amazon caves after two days, and agrees to Macmillans demands to sell its e-books at a higher price
otherwise known as the Apple iPad pricing plan. In doing so, the worlds biggest e-commerce player has made a tacit admission that e-book prices will be rising across the board."


http://mediamemo.allthingsd.com/2010...es-will-go-up/
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post #56 of 103
My take on the broader issue of access to information that this battle highlights:
http://yousayyeah.com/article/2010/0..._chain_battles
post #57 of 103
"...taht book publishers..."???

Taht's a new word to me!
post #58 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by rufwork View Post

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/01/te...zonweb.html?hp

"In a fight over the price of electronic books, Amazon.com has blinked."

Next, they fix the cable.

Oh man... Bezos just lost all credibility for all time.
post #59 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You also know that right now, Amazon is losing several dollars on every "hardcover" they sell.

Really? So are they making a profit on the softcovers? What's happening with Amazon?
post #60 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonQG View Post

I don't know where you get your books, but I usually see new hardcovers for $12-15. Nobody ever seems to sell them for MSRP.


I can't believe that people are defending Apple for undoing all the good work Amazon has done for consumers. I like Apple and I love my Macs, iPods, and iPhone, but because of this and other anti-consumer issues, I wish the iPad didn't exist.

Uh, what? Sorry but that isn't true, at all. In general we're talking about NEWER releases as well. No you're not going to pay $26 in a store for Moby Dick.
post #61 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzExige View Post

Amazon has caved in - but, of course you all new that, didn't you?

"Amazon caves after two days, and agrees to Macmillans demands to sell its e-books at a higher price
otherwise known as the Apple iPad pricing plan. In doing so, the worlds biggest e-commerce player has made a tacit admission that e-book prices will be rising across the board."


http://mediamemo.allthingsd.com/2010...es-will-go-up/

Good. Now somebody contact Random House for crying out loud.
post #62 of 103
Do I have a say in this debate if I don't really READ BOOKS at all nowadays? Since Da Vinci code, that is. Interesting but quite mediocre a book, as are most nowadays. I'm 32... Maybe it's my generation?

That's why I want Flash on the iPad for full web browsing (oh boy, I just hijacked the thread... oops)

Sorry, carry on...
post #63 of 103
Boy, I'm sorry but being a Kindle fanboi is really, really gay.

I know, you wouldn't expect me to use such a term, but I can't think of anything else to say...

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Over on the Amazon.com Kindle forums, the Kindle users are falling at the feet of Bezos, saying how they are going to boycott Macmillan books (as if "Macmillan" was an author) and fantasizing about Bezos and AMZN going into the indie publishing business (as if Amazon got into ANY business that required the kind of care and feeding of thousands of authors for potentially no payback). Worth browsing in your spare time, if only for laughs:

http://bit.ly/9zehXS

The best part is when the "Amazon Kindle Team" (whoever that is) says:

Uh, yeah, that "monopoly" is called a publishing contract and it sets the terms of the agreement between the publisher and author, including giving the publisher exclusive distribution rights. It works the same for every publishing company that sells books to Amazon. If the "Amazon Kindle Team" hasn't figured out how that works by now, they must not be ready to go into the indie publishing business any time soon.

If nothing else, they certainly have the Kindle faithful lathered up!
post #64 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post


Basically what I'm saying is, yes, it may cost a bit more, but it could end better for publishers and authors, which in the end could be better for us.

So you are happy that the prices are higher?
post #65 of 103
and once again we see how it's not about the customer, but about making money out of the customer. a digitally distributed book does not have a cover, no printing costs, no distribution with a truck and a person that hands over the book to you, types in the price and gives you change for your money and still it costs the same? that is not fair!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #66 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by bodypainter View Post

and once again we see how it's not about the customer, but about making money out of the customer. a digitally distributed book does not have a cover, no printing costs, no distribution with a truck and a person that hands over the book to you, types in the price and gives you change for your money and still it costs the same? that is not fair!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Well, that's the beauty of capitalism, people will read more websites and so on, and less as physical or e-books, and eventually these publishers will learn their lesson... The world is changing rapidly. For better or worse.

In most emerging markets people will be doing a heck of a lot more reading online than with books, especially after leaving school.
post #67 of 103
Between the costs of producing a book (publisher) and the costs of selling it (amazon) there is negotiating room, and for a mammoth market presence like Amazon, they enjoy Wal-Mart-esque "monopsony" power, which is the buyer's equivalent of a monopoly (which technically refers to one seller). Therefore, the prices in these negotiations probably favored Amazon, because who would ever dare NOT sell to amazon? (see what happened to Rubbermaid when they told Wal-Mart to screw themselves... their sales disappeared overnight).

Apple gives publishers another mainstream outlet, and therefore negotiating power at the table with Amazon. Clearly it was MacMillan that smugly started this skirmish, and they probably had a right to be pissed after getting strongarmed all this time. Besides, with a name like Amazon (and a logo that suggests "A to Z") you are in the diversity business and it damages your brand too much to leave a major player out like this and have customers shopping elsewhere for it.

So even if Jobs "screws the customer" on this one by getting publishers more money, it is ultimately a win for competition, since Amazon's advantage was probably anti-competitive (monopolistic) to some extent.

The longer term question is just like with the music labels: why do we need publishing houses? If they are just vertical integrators of discovering / bankrolling / editing / marketing / inventorying books, why can't the next great american novel just be brought to apple directly? Or amazon for that matter? Or published from one's own website?

Sure, someone has to give Sarah Palin her bazillion dollar advance for her book, and find someone literate to actually ghostwrite it -- just like Britney Spears needs a lot of help in producing an album -- but ultimately the days of the little guy placing his beloved manuscript in a worn, soft leather briefcase. hailing a cab uptown, and taking it into a skyscraper to bring it to the masses are hopefully on the decline.

And we'll be better for it; tell me: does a physics 101 textbook really need to cost $100 and be rewritten every few years, or is that done just to juice the demand? Publishing houses aren't exactly playing clean, either. You get the idea.
post #68 of 103
Great post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by benny-boy View Post

Between the costs of producing a book (publisher) and the costs of selling it (amazon) there is negotiating room, and for a mammoth market presence like Amazon, they enjoy Wal-Mart-esque "monopsony" power, which is the buyer's equivalent of a monopoly (which technically refers to one seller). Therefore, the prices in these negotiations probably favored Amazon, because who would ever dare NOT sell to amazon? (see what happened to Rubbermaid when they told Wal-Mart to screw themselves... their sales disappeared overnight).

Apple gives publishers another mainstream outlet, and therefore negotiating power at the table with Amazon. Clearly it was MacMillan that smugly started this skirmish, and they probably had a right to be pissed after getting strongarmed all this time. Besides, with a name like Amazon (and a logo that suggests "A to Z") you are in the diversity business and it damages your brand too much to leave a major player out like this and have customers shopping elsewhere for it.

So even if Jobs "screws the customer" on this one by getting publishers more money, it is ultimately a win for competition, since Amazon's advantage was probably anti-competitive (monopolistic) to some extent.

The longer term question is just like with the music labels: why do we need publishing houses? If they are just vertical integrators of discovering / bankrolling / editing / marketing / inventorying books, why can't the next great american novel just be brought to apple directly? Or amazon for that matter? Or published from one's own website?

Sure, someone has to give Sarah Palin her bazillion dollar advance for her book, and find someone literate to actually ghostwrite it -- just like Britney Spears needs a lot of help in producing an album -- but ultimately the days of the little guy toting his manuscript into a skyscraper to bring it to the masses are hopefully on the decline.

And we'll be better for it; tell me: does a physics 101 textbook really need to cost $100 and be rewritten every few years, or is that done just to juice the demand? Publishing houses aren't exactly playing clean, either. You get the idea.
post #69 of 103
Apple overnight has become a major digital publisher. This is going to shake things up, starting in the US, and hopefully growing rapidly internationally. I'm not saying Apple is the Saviour, just that at least there is a little bit more nudging to things.
post #70 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by benny-boy View Post

So even if Jobs "screws the customer" on this one by getting publishers more money, it is ultimately a win for competition, since Amazon's advantage was probably anti-competitive (monopolistic) to some extent.


In general, increased competition makes prices go DOWN. In general, increased competition is good for consumers. In general, prices trend towards the marginal cost of production in a competitive environment.

Here, the marginal cost of production is near zero. Here, the prices are going up. Here, the consumer is getting screwed by a duopoly of retailers.
post #71 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

In general, increased competition makes prices go DOWN. In general, increased competition is good for consumers. In general, prices trend towards the marginal cost of production in a competitive environment.

Here, the marginal cost of production is near zero. Here, the prices are going up. Here, the consumer is getting screwed by a duopoly of retailers.

I think you're stating the marginal cost a bit too low. My brother's fiancee was working in Penguin UK (London) for about a year. Yes digitally producing a "copy" of a book is apparently negligible but I heard her describe some of Penguins efforts to digitize their entire catalog while still publishing new books. The thing is, there's also so many digital formats... There's a lot of overhead.

Not that the consumer needs to be punished, I agree, and prices could go lower. But at least there's more competition now.
post #72 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

I think you're stating the marginal cost a bit too low. My brother's fiancee was working in Penguin UK (London) for about a year. Yes digitally producing a "copy" of a book is apparently negligible

Please look up the phrase "marginal cost". The rest of your post does not discuss marginal costs of production, but instead, other types of costs.
post #73 of 103
This is the best thread I've read on AI all week.

If we continue to focus on the fact that the marginal cost of e-book production will effectively be zero, this does support the idea that prices must fall in the long run. By having no marginal cost, and selling a product that is highly price sensitive, it provides lots of incentive for vendors to be very aggressive on pricing.

However, what we don't yet have is anything like a real competitive set of online retailers selling e-books. Buyers wherever possible need to be opting to have a number of book sellers available to them, else they'll end up captured to one retailer that ends up squeezing the market to suit their own ends.

As ever, this means we want open standards, and to reject a one-device, one retailer model wherever possible. The problem, however, is that wherever companies can they will be tempted to limit the crossover opportunities (using DRM and other contrivances) to make substitution difficult.
post #74 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Apple overnight has become a major digital publisher. This is going to shake things up, starting in the US, and hopefully growing rapidly internationally. I'm not saying Apple is the Saviour, just that at least there is a little bit more nudging to things.

Apple has become a major digital distributor.

Publishing is a whole other animal.

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post #75 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Please look up the phrase "marginal cost". The rest of your post does not discuss marginal costs of production, but instead, other types of costs.

I think his point is correct. Those other costs are amortized over the whole run and can eventually be negligible. However, ebook aren't a high enough seller for publishers to realize those costs back. Authors (non-bestselling ones) are only seeing sales in the hundreds, not thousands. If they sell enough then publishers will lower the price.

If ebooks ever REALLY take off then the price can come down. With costs and demand as they are, ebooks are like a "limited edition" of a book. And publishers don't have the funds to put up with those costs on each book just to help increase the market.

For the short term, Amazon is the only real profit maker.
post #76 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by BB Sting View Post

They should just let the publishers decide what they want to charge, let the free market decide what e books should go for, enough with the price fixing already!

Which is exactly what Macmillan wants.

It's the same as the iTunes store. Initially, all songs were $0.99, but later, Apple allowed (after pressure from music publishers) a range of prices. Same thing is happening in the book market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty321 View Post

Apple should have defended the consumer here and insisted on the lower pricing that amazon.com charges. It costs next to NOTHING to distribute an eBook... $9.99 is MORE THAN ENOUGH to charge for an eBook. It's a real shame that Apple didn't go to bat for consumers this time around, while amazon.com did.

Who determines what's MORE THAN ENOUGH? You? Sorry, I don't trust your judgment. There are textbooks which cost hundreds of dollars and have tens of thousands of hours of author's work in them - but which may not sell in huge quantities. Why is $9.99 the right price? Furthermore, there are books that I don't think are worth more than $5. Shouldn't it be up to the MARKET to set prices?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

If your running a business and your supplier just raised their prices 133%, you surely can deny carrying their products if it doesn't bother making your business worthwhile.

This really irritates me - Macmillan's position is being misquoted all the time.

Amazon wanted all books to be $9.99. Macmillan wanted to be able to set the price depending on what they thought the market would support. Some would be $15, but others would be as low as $5 or 6. Not all prices would go up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake Princess View Post

I have no problem paying a measly $15.00 for an eBook. The arguments make about as much sense and expecting a Picasso for the price of canvas and paint. The value is the content, not the delivery method. I can't wait to get an iPad.

No one seems to complain about spending an equal amount for a movie or other entertainment. Why all the complaining? If the book is too expensive for you then don't buy it---go to the library and borrow it instead.

Exactly. I'd go one step further. I can make a painting that's larger than a Picasso and uses lots more canvas and ink so it's more expensive to produce. I guess all these people think I should charge MORE than a Picasso since mine cost more, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

So you are happy that the prices are higher?

They're not. SOME Prices are higher and some are lower. Why is it that you constantly insist on commenting on things without having even the basic facts right?
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post #77 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Apple has become a major digital distributor.

Publishing is a whole other animal.

And publishing is just what Amazon wishes to do. To get their new terms of only 30% cut going to Amazon, they get a license to publish for the Kindle platform along with other stipulations in their favor. I believe that is also a major sticking point with the traditional publishers.

And I doubt that Amazon will be offering any of the usual help to authors that publishers give. Some artists may not need any guidance and help producing their work, but even big names in every field find great value that type of relationship.
post #78 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macadamias View Post

With costs and demand as they are, ebooks are like a "limited edition" of a book. And publishers don't have the funds to put up with those costs on each book just to help increase the market.

Generally, the price of a product trends towards its marginal cost of production, unless I misunderstand some sort of basic of economics 101.

The marginal cost of an eBook approaches zero.

What you describe is not marginal costs, but instead sunk costs: "those costs on each book".

Perhaps you are saying that publishers are subsidizing physical books with eBooks? It is difficult for me to determine.
post #79 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Exactly. I'd go one step further. I can make a painting that's larger than a Picasso and uses lots more canvas and ink so it's more expensive to produce. I guess all these people think I should charge MORE than a Picasso since mine cost more, right?


Since when do material costs determine market price? I was under the impression that supply and demand set market prices.
post #80 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Generally, the price of a product trends towards its marginal cost of production, unless I misunderstand some sort of basic of economics 101.

The marginal cost of an eBook approaches zero.

What you describe is not marginal costs, but instead sunk costs: "those costs on each book".

Perhaps you are saying that publishers are subsidizing physical books with eBooks? It is difficult for me to determine.

The marginal cost of an eBook approaches zero only when the quantity sold is high enough.

The cost to make an eBook "edition" is separate from the costs for a physical copy. So they aren't trying to subsidize the physical books. If anything, they would have to subsidize the eBooks because they aren't making enough money on them yet for the cost of making an electronic edition.
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