or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › And The Oscar Goes To...?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

And The Oscar Goes To...? - Page 2

post #41 of 69
My thoughts:

Best Picture
Should win: Fellowship of the Ring
Will win: A Beautiful Mind

Best Actor
Should win: Russell Crowe
Will win: Russell Crowe

Best Actress
Should win: Haven't seen enough of these movies to know.
Will win: Sissy Spacek

Best Supporting Actor
Should win: Ian McKellen. He gave FOTR its soul.
Will win: McKellen. "Sexy Beast" isn't on enough radar screens among the voters.

Best Supporting Actress
Should win: Jennifer Connolly
Will win: Connolly.

Best Director
Should win: Peter Jackson
Will win: Robert Altman. The "lifetime achievement award" theory.

FOTR will sweep most of the technical categories for which it was nominated, except perhaps Art Direction, which might go to Gosford Park (although it shouldn't).
Why am I whispering?
Reply
Why am I whispering?
Reply
post #42 of 69
[quote]Originally posted by Scott H.:
<strong>I used to think that way and then I saw Frances McDormand win for Fargo. I think it was over that Titanic bitch too who thought she had it locked up.</strong><hr></blockquote>

:confused: "Titanic" was the year after "Fargo." McDormand won over Kristin Scott Thomas of "The English Patient" and Emily Watson of "Breaking the Waves."
Why am I whispering?
Reply
Why am I whispering?
Reply
post #43 of 69
A Beautiful Mind's only weakness was Ron Howard doing what he typically does...dragging scenes for minutes longer than they should be. That is not enough for it to be snuffed by Lord of the Rings.
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #44 of 69
Just watched Moulin Rouge or whatever, sucked heinous ass.

Better than Titanic, though, but then again, Battlefield: Earth was almost as good as Titanic.
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #45 of 69
[quote] pfflam: Your right about Moulin Rouge not having a plot, but that was the point. It was a comedy about how bad love stories/musicals are. Hell, look at how friggin CORNEY almost EVERY song was (except Roxanne, which was a terrific scene). <hr></blockquote>

Didn't I say that I was aware of its pretended irony. I don't think you understand, I GET IT.... there just isn't anything to get. . . its 'camp' quality is in fact not campy, its irony not ironic, its 'knowing' badness is just plain bad!!!!

I have seen many many many films (and made them too) of all sorts from extremely experimantal ex; Paul Scharitz, to Monty Python... I know what I'm saying (IMO): . . this movie was not as sophisticated in its comedy as it at first promised to be, and/or thought itself to be. Very few scholars of camp will covet this film as a completely smart triumph when they write their Lacanian critiques of contemporary musicals for tenure.

As for LOTR, I loved the film!!, but its editing was a hack job. It feels like they tried to sqeeze a large book into three hours.... which is just what they did. And, ontop of that, the camera never rested: Jackson used too many Television and MTV camera movement cliches: it had the positive effect of moving the action fast so that you felt that they were really in a hurry,
but
it had the negative effect of moving the action fast so that you never got a sense of distance traversed, or fatigue or weariness, and you also never got a breath or a place to just soak in the visual splendor. . . . even the fine scenes of Orthanc, or of Rivendell, were but splices: its almost as if he were afraid that if you looked too long you would see the Computer graphics or the Matte painting

Consequently, the further I got from seeing the movie the more difficult it became to remember it as a live action film: I kept visualizing it as an animation:

anybody else experience this?
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #46 of 69
Moulin Rogue wanted to be taken seriously. It wasn't a campy flick at all, it was a joke.

Army of Darkness, that's camp.

Moulin Rouge, that's crap.

I appreciate what they were trying to do but it was an unmitigated failure because at the end of the day they wanted to do a regular movie. In short, they didn't have the balls to do it right.

When you make a half-assed attempt at camp you end up with crap.

(Of course, once I heard the chords to "Smells Like Teen Spirit" I felt dirty.)
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #47 of 69
[quote]Originally posted by pfflam:
<strong>As for LOTR, I loved the film!!, but its editing was a hack job. It feels like they tried to sqeeze a large book into three hours.... which is just what they did. And, ontop of that, the camera never rested: Jackson used too many Television and MTV camera movement cliches: it had the positive effect of moving the action fast so that you felt that they were really in a hurry, but it had the negative effect of moving the action fast so that you never got a sense of distance traversed, or fatigue or weariness, and you also never got a breath or a place to just soak in the visual splendor. . . . even the fine scenes of Orthanc, or of Rivendell, were but splices: its almost as if he were afraid that if you looked too long you would see the Computer graphics or the Matte painting

Consequently, the further I got from seeing the movie the more difficult it became to remember it as a live action film: I kept visualizing it as an animation:

anybody else experience this?</strong><hr></blockquote>
No no no! Please don't compare Mr. Jackson's work with MTV! His style comes from decades of horror movie cliches, not MTV and television cliches.

The camera movement, extreme close-ups, pushes - it's all straight out the horror film shot manual (And for those who don't know, Mr. Jackson is something of a god-like figure in the world of low-budget horror).

I thought the editing was good for the reason you disliked it - the speed, and the fact you didn't get to see the effects properly. Harry Potter made this mistake - if the effects are on screen too long, they look awful (Particularly the much-lauded but actually terrible Quidditch scene).

I was worried the movie would be too like the book, i.e. dull as dirty dishwater, so it was a pleasant surprise to find such a fast pace to the editing. I couldn't take my eyes off the screen.
Chicanery.
Reply
Chicanery.
Reply
post #48 of 69
Just got back from In The Bedroom. Wow.

Tom Wilkinson deserves the Best Actor nod, a close race between him and Crowe, but he was fantastic. I think Sissy Spacek is also the most deserving of Best Actress (I haven't seen Iris yet so I don't know about Judi Dench's performance, although she always rules).

(I hope Moulin Rouge gets snubbed entirely, but I think they will/should throw it Best Art Direction or something like that.)
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #49 of 69
Bah, Im not going to try to defend Moulin Rouge any more. I found it funny, I thought that the camera work was superb (what really made it for me), but I agree, it had no substance. However that being the point, and making up for it in wit and style, it still made it.
Kinda like Ghost int he Shell in that respect.

Jackson used too many Television and MTV camera movement cliches: it had the positive effect of moving the action fast so that you felt that they were really in a hurry,


Really? I watched it and thought "Man, this looks like a bad doccumentary film". However not once did I think that the splicing was bad. Mind you I went in expecting the splicing to be HORRID, so perhaps that had an effect.
Personally, I dont think that you could have done much better with the material given. Maybe if you got Arnofski or some one in there but...
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
post #50 of 69
The best thing about in the bedroom was the lack of nondiegetic music . . .very rare in movies . . . LOTRs could have used a page from that book . . . it had entirely too much music throughout. . .

. but yes as I said I loved it, the pace left you breathless and at the end I literally exhaled and relaxed after three hourse of sitting rapt

also I had to pee so bad I couldn't stand straight.
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #51 of 69
when are the oscars anyway?
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #52 of 69
The more I look back on In The Bedroom the more I'm convinced that I just loved that movie to death.

The oscars will be ready to go once I get all this tasty Mexican food digested well. Look for the results in my toilet tomorrow morning.
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #53 of 69
Thread Starter 
According to <a href="http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/bpihw/20020318/en_bpihw/aol_moviefone_poll_christens__rings___crowe&printe r=1" target="_blank">this article</a>, a poll of internet users finds: LotR, Russell Crowe, and Nicole Kidman are the most popular.
post #54 of 69
Nicole Kidman... feh!
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #55 of 69
Is it only me who does not care about anything that goes on at the Oscars?

Why should we care?
post #56 of 69
According to this article, a poll of internet users finds: LotR, Russell Crowe, and Nicole Kidman are the most popular.

Hehe, just imagine Kent Brockman saying that

Seriously, internet polls are bullcrap.
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
post #57 of 69
Thread Starter 
<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62274-2002Mar21.html" target="_blank">The Oscar predictions</a> of a crack smoking politician.
post #58 of 69
Oscars, Grammys, MTV awards, these awards, those awards, yet more ****ing award shows: the whole damned lot of these these self-congratulatory corporate entertainment wankfests are broadcast with monotonous regularity and watching them is as fun as having teeth pulled. As if the arbitrary decisions of some equally arbitrary panel has any meaning or significance: who/whatever wins is always a reflection of how many units that particular item shifted, which is far more a function of advertising, promotion and corporate politics rather than art, craft, invention, performance, skill and merit. Award shows ...big yawn at best.
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
Reply
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
Reply
post #59 of 69
Thread Starter 
[quote]
<strong> Award shows ...big yawn at best.</strong><hr></blockquote>

I disagree. It's always fun to watch rich egomaniacs act like fools.

Edit: Fixed quote

[ 03-21-2002: Message edited by: glurx ]</p>
post #60 of 69
Best picture: Gosford Park

Best Director: David Lynch

Best Actor: Sean Penn or Wilkinson

Best Actress: Halle Berry

Best Supporting Actor: Ben Kingsley

Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Connelly

Of course the best Animation: Monsters
post #61 of 69
[quote]Originally posted by imacman287:
<strong>Is it only me who does not care about anything that goes on at the Oscars?

Why should we care?</strong><hr></blockquote>

No reason at all, really. At the end of the day, a movie's box-office popularity is more important than the awards it gets. The Oscars are highly overrated awards given by a group of people whose opinions aren't any more valid than others. Why people care, I still don't know.

That said, I liked a bunch of these movies -- Moulin Rouge, LOTR, A Beautiful Mind ... Black Hawk Down was ok. Accurate, but beyond a point pretty boring and pointless. I haven't seen Iris, In the Bedroom, Amélie, Gosford Park, Ali, Monster's Ball, or even Training Day (how this got into the running I have no idea, coming from the previews I saw..."AH AM THE POLICE! KING KONG AIN'T GOT NOTHING ON ME!" Eh?), so I might have liked a bunch of those as well had I taken the time to see them.

But frankly, I don't care who/what the awards go to, because I know what I liked. The Oscars have often been <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/Movies/03/22/aa.oscar.trends/index.html" target="_blank">unrelated to quality of performance</a> and have often not given awards to those who deserve it the most. But with the way the Oscars work, even if an actor or actress gets snubbed (Nicole Kidman is an interesting variable here, especially given what that article mentions...I've always had a thing for Nicole Kidman, so I'm biased in that regard and will keep my mouth shut ) for their current work, they'll often end up with an Oscar for a less distinguished performance later in their career.

So don't lose sleep over it. They'll ALL get Oscars eventually.
"If I were a younger man, I would write a history of human stupidity; and I would climb to the top of Mount McCabe and lie down on my back with my history for a pillow; and I would take from the...
Reply
"If I were a younger man, I would write a history of human stupidity; and I would climb to the top of Mount McCabe and lie down on my back with my history for a pillow; and I would take from the...
Reply
post #62 of 69
[quote]Originally posted by glurx:
<strong>It's always fun to watch rich egomaniacs act like fools.</strong><hr></blockquote>I always enjoy watching them try to smile as the other people win the award.
post #63 of 69
God I just watched In the Bedroom.

Im not afraid to admit that I cried.
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
post #64 of 69
I didn't cry, but it was one of the most emotionally draining movies I've ever seen.

When he's sitting and waiting for the bridge to finish turning towards the end... jeez... felt like it took hours to get past that scene.

Fantastic movie.
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
proud resident of a failed state
Reply
post #65 of 69
Yes it was a very emotionaly draining movie. I did have more than a few tears in my eye at certain scenes. Like the first poker game after the son is killed. And the parents fight in the kitchen (who else thought that the girl scout cookies girl at the door was just brilliant). I loved the down to earth nature of the movie. And the acting was just so good.
The dialogue was so simplistic that you could expect to hear in your own home.
It definately was not a feel good movie, but was an almost real look into the cycle of grief that is experienced by parents who loose their children. (the ending not withstanding)
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
post #66 of 69
Playing someone crazy/retarded generally ensures an oscar nomination, and usually a win.

Russell Crowe didn't deserve best actor and I'm glad he didn't get it.

But Beautiful Lie definitely didn't deserve best picture. Moulin Rouge and LOTR:FOTR were both far better. Even more clearly than best picture, Ron Howard did not deserve best director.

I think Moulin Rouge was brilliant. One of the best I've seen since Fight Club and Being John Malkovich. I like surreal, if you can't tell.

I realize LOTR won't appeal to everyone as much as it does to someone who has read the books a dozen times starting from the age of nine. I agree that if you are not familiar with the characters, there are quite a few too many too keep the easily confused interested.

But Beautiful Lie was crap from beginning to end. Anyone could have made that movie (and nearly anyone would have made it better), and anyone could have acted the lead. It not only distorted the facts, it completely fictionalized them. The extent of the real life dementia suffered by Nash was watered down to the point that the finished product was no where near the truth. There was a huge potential to use this angle to make a great movie, but Howard was seemingly stuck in Mayberry when it came to execution.

Ron Howard deserves a Raspberry, not the two most coveted awards of the film industry (Best Picture and Best Director).
post #67 of 69
I didn't cry, but it was one of the most emotionally draining movies I've ever seen

Go see Requiem for a Dream.
All I wanted at the end of this flick was to curl up into a fetal position...
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
Reply
post #68 of 69
I love movies that just get in you. Long after you have finnished watching it, the movie still hangs heavily over you. You replay the scenes over and over again in your mind, you just cant get it out of your head.

Movies like FF:TSW and In the Bedroom do this, at least to me.
Yeah im a sucker for romatic tragedies.
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
"What makes a man turn... neutral?" -Futurama
Reply
post #69 of 69
The only not-wins that I am dissapointed with (not having seen ..Mind though I bet its mawkish tripe as would befitt Howard)
are:

Sexy Beast for supporting-actor (it was so so so obviouse, all of the acting in that movie was from a standard about five tiers higher than anything seen this year ...maybe even for years... all of its acting!!!!!)

and that piece of shiite: Shrek beating Monsters Inc.

oh yeah and the British woman who played in that detecctive series and in Gosford Park should have won for supporting actress.

Didn't see Halle Barry act, but her performance at the Oscars was embarrassing!!! all of her non stop snivelling and fake crying was painfull and went on for ever... what a ham.

Sissy Spacek was overrated in In THe Bedroom: her acting was very perceptably self consciouse: the real actor in that movie was the father guy (forget his name)
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › And The Oscar Goes To...?