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One in five physicians likely to purchase Apple iPad - study

post #1 of 185
Thread Starter 
More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one.

This week, Epocrates Inc., the developer of mobile applications used by more than 900,000 healthcare professionals worldwide, revealed a new study of more than 350 clinicians conducted in the wake of Apple's iPad announcement. Among those surveyed, 9 percent said they plan to buy an iPad when it is immediately available, and another 13 percent intend to purchase one in the first year.

In addition, another 38 percent of respondents said they are interested in the iPad, but would like to obtain more information about the product before they decide whether or not they will purchase.

With a belief the iPad will gain traction in the health care community, Epocrates also announced this week that it intends to customize its clinical reference application, which is already available for the iPhone and iPod touch, for the iPad.

"By optimizing our software for the iPad, we are capitalizing on the larger screen real estate and interactivity provided by this sophisticated device," said Rose Crane, chief executive officer of Epocrates. "We are committed to providing the most productive experience at the point of care, keeping physicians informed and focused on the patient rather than searching for answers."

'We are continuing to explore the advanced capabilities of the iPad and ways it can help Epocrates address the evolving healthcare technology needs."

Epocrates said that its iPhone medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians. The software has more than 275,000 physician subscribers using its software, which is available for iPhone, BlackBerry and Palm. More than 900,000 clinicians worldwide use Epocrates.

The company's software was featured by Apple at its iPhone Software Roadmap event in 2008. The Epocrates medical reference application was the first available on the App Store.



The study follows news earlier this week that some hospitals are looking at potential applications for the iPad. One San Francisco program, dubbed "Destination Bedside," aims to use tablets to provide X-rays, charts, prescriptions and notes to hospital workers at the touch of a finger.

The success of Apple's iPad in the medical field will likely depend on the creation of third-party applications for the device like Epocrates. In addition to a number of bundled applications, the iPad will have access to Apple's App Store, which now offers more than 140,000 different options.

The iPad has a starting price of $499 and is scheduled to ship by the end of March. The 3G-enabled version, which carries a $130 premium, should arrive a month later.
post #2 of 185
Let me be the first to say:
post #3 of 185
I'd be interested in it too....I use Epocrates every day at work....but wish it could be more responsive (sometimes when the iPhone is busying doing other things - ie retrieving mail etc., it the other apps slow down). I'm sure new medical apps will follow.

I am a little concerned that this expensive device will get damaged with so much daily use around the hospital/clinics etc...much easier to slip the iphone in my pocket when I'm walking out of the room, than forgetting it in the room (and risk it getting stolen).
post #4 of 185
[QUOTE=AppleInsider;1566945]More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad.

THANK GOD!!!
post #5 of 185
...

There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!

I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.

To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.
post #6 of 185
Four out of five physicians don't recommend the iPad for daily use.
post #7 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.

Except that it doesn't say that. The survey was among healthcare professionals, not just doctors.
Please don't be insane.
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post #8 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sojourner View Post

I'd be interested in it too....I use Epocrates every day at work....but wish it could be more responsive (sometimes when the iPhone is busying doing other things - ie retrieving mail etc., it the other apps slow down). I'm sure new medical apps will follow.

I am a little concerned that this expensive device will get damaged with so much daily use around the hospital/clinics etc...much easier to slip the iphone in my pocket when I'm walking out of the room, than forgetting it in the room (and risk it getting stolen).

Epocrates is awesome. I use it for nearly all of my dosage calculations.
post #9 of 185
Just by reading the title I thought this was going to be stupid.
post #10 of 185
Revised Edit
post #11 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Except that it doesn't say that. The survey was among healthcare professionals, not just doctors.

Really? Here's the title of the article:
"One in five physicians likely to purchase Apple iPad - study"

And here is the first sentence:
"More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one."

And here is another statement later in the article:
"Epocrates said that its medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians."

Seems to me the article is pretty clear that it is talking about doctors.
post #12 of 185
I use Eppocrates almost daily as well. Like the the other poster I often find it to be sluggish in use. This is on a 3gs.

I think that the iPad could be awesome for medical applications but Eppocrates isn't it. E-crates is useful but not killer. I'm anxious to see what other developers can do.
post #13 of 185
on of my wife's doctors uses epocrates - on an iPhone - except that when I saw him use it (in late 2008) - the iPhone version did not have prices and he had to pull out a treo (I think it was a treo - might have been a blackberry) to get the pricing. not sure if that was because it had only just come out or he had not updated his subscription or whatever.

the medical imaging type apps would certainly benefit from larger screen space.

For HIPPA and other regulatory compliance I suspect they would have to be able to connect to some backend server where the info is kept or at least support the password lock and remote wipe functions of the iPhone - so that if a device is lost no one's privacy is compromised.
post #14 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Sorry, but it is not quite clear but it could have been conducted on 'clinicians'.

It would appear that in the beginning of the article that Epocrates has over 900,000 healthcare professionals using their software and out of that number one-fifth of them, i.e., 275,00 are physicians.

However, later in the article, it does state that, "More than 900,000 clinicians worldwide use Epocrates."

Unfortunately, we don't have the exact protocol used in the study. In any event, the results are quite impressive.

The terminology used is vague, but I take it that the survey was conducted by the developer to determine the interest level in the iPad version of their software, not to manufacture unrealistic expectations.
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post #15 of 185
Anyone in the medicare profession know there are different roles and different uses for software. epocrates has a drug reference, and would not be any more amazing on an iPad (than an iPhone) used primarily by pharmacists and physicians. iPads that are used for medical imaging, and education would really make the most use of the device.
post #16 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by aep528 View Post

Seems to me the article is pretty clear that it is talking about doctors.

Only if you consider a "clinician" is always a doctor.

"a new study of more than 350 clinicians "
post #17 of 185
Count me as one physician who will get the iPad the day it comes out. However I don't plan on using it at work. This may replace my Kindle and allow me to use the laptop less at home.

Epocrates, how I loved thee. I used to use it all the time. Now with electronic medical record most the dosing and information is on the computer.

For those who complain of Epocrates, try Medscape's iPhone application.
1. It's free
2. Launches almost instantly
3. It's faster then Epocrates
4. Has drug interactions
5. Also has CME and Physician Directory
-Toyin
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-Toyin
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post #18 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

...

There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!

I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.

To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.

$150.00/year is some pretty serious change for a doctor. Hell, its the entire cost a single patient visit!
post #19 of 185
All these great Apps are wonderful, but they need a corresponding software on a Windows or Mac to process data or move it to other applications that rely upon more hardware capabilities that only a computer provides.

So eventually, despite how hard Apple tries to lock down the iPad, it's going to have to realize that software needs to be able to access all devices and be uniform.

So there should be no reason why Apps can't be run on Windows or OS X so everything is compatible with what's on iPads, iPhones and iPod Touches, Apple will have to come around to that conclusion eventually.

The sooner the better IMMO.
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #20 of 185
Apple better get on that advertising campaign. If Trident can get 4 out of 5 dentist you would think Apple could get more than 1 out of 5 physicians
post #21 of 185
So to all the nay sayers I gotta give it to you - this thing is not for power users, not for professionals, not for business. Its a toy, nothing but an enlarged iPod Touch. A silly device for technically challenged incompetents. Yup, you're right. This thing will tank.
post #22 of 185
Huge. And it's not even on sale yet.
post #23 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

So to all the nay sayers I gotta give it to you - this thing is not for power users, not for professionals, not for business. Its a toy, nothing but an enlarged iPod Touch. A silly device for technically challenged incompetents. Yup, you're right. This thing will tank.

Go back and play with your Windows 7 Netbook.

Enlarged iPod Touch. Where have I read that before? Oh yeah, the 6,432 articles that have mentioned the same thing!

You seem a bit challenged yourself buddy.
post #24 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sojourner View Post

I'd be interested in it too....I use Epocrates every day at work....but wish it could be more responsive (sometimes when the iPhone is busying doing other things - ie retrieving mail etc., it the other apps slow down). I'm sure new medical apps will follow.

I am a little concerned that this expensive device will get damaged with so much daily use around the hospital/clinics etc...much easier to slip the iphone in my pocket when I'm walking out of the room, than forgetting it in the room (and risk it getting stolen).

I wouldn't be. I'm sure there will be something like six-thousand-eight-hundred-and-thirty-nine different kinds of protective cases for the thing.
This is going to be used in the field by the military, construction; you name it.
post #25 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by aep528 View Post

Really? Here's the title of the article:
"One in five physicians likely to purchase Apple iPad - study"

And here is the first sentence:
"More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one."

And here is another statement later in the article:
"Epocrates said that its medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians."

Seems to me the article is pretty clear that it is talking about doctors.

Is your problem with AI's wording in it's article, or with the study itself?
post #26 of 185
But isn't the significance of this report about first year sales potential, rather than the college degree of the purchaser?
post #27 of 185
So, doctors will be telling us we're going to die using a device configured by................iTunes.
post #28 of 185
I'm not a doctor but I play one on TV. And when I need to look busy I use the iPad...
post #29 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

Go back and play with your Windows 7 Netbook.

Enlarged iPod Touch. Where have I read that before? Oh yeah, the 6,432 articles that have mentioned the same thing!

You seem a bit challenged yourself buddy.

Oops. Forgot to add my sarky flag Thought it was kinda obvious
post #30 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

$150.00/year is some pretty serious change for a doctor. Hell, its the entire cost a single patient visit!

Where did you find a doctor that only charges $150 per visit?
post #31 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by joseph1 View Post

But isn't the significance of this report about first year sales potential, rather than the college degree of the purchaser?

Yup. Lots of people immediately see how they can use the device to either replace/supplement something else they have, or to do things they can't do today.

All because it is a "super-sized iPod Touch." ...that they understand how they will interact with before the device is even available.

While a number of these applications never come to fruition based on past experience (still surprised more people don't use Apple TV's for digital signage), the iPad is largely a known-beast. I've heard some pretty cool ideas for applications that don't really work on the smaller screen.

The one thing I haven't seen yet is protective cases that will make it suitable for some of the harsher environments.
post #32 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

...

There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!

I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.

To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.

of the three 'docs' I asked, all of them plan to buy one; including myself, 4 of 4. I'm hard pressed to believe that this won't be the fastest apple product to reach the five million mark. If you're a med student, then you've probably tried lifting radiology or pathology texts, any of which weighs 5 to 10 pounds; that alone will make this a killer device

Off to the vomitorium, Roscoe
post #33 of 185
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post #34 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one.

This week, Epocrates Inc., the developer of mobile applications used by more than 900,000 healthcare professionals worldwide, revealed a new study of more than 350 clinicians conducted in the wake of Apple's iPad announcement. Among those surveyed, 9 percent said they plan to buy an iPad when it is immediately available, and another 13 percent intend to purchase one in the first year.

In addition, another 38 percent of respondents said they are interested in the iPad, but would like to obtain more information about the product before they decide whether or not they will purchase.

With a belief the iPad will gain traction in the health care community, Epocrates also announced this week that it intends to customize its clinical reference application, which is already available for the iPhone and iPod touch, for the iPad.

"By optimizing our software for the iPad, we are capitalizing on the larger screen real estate and interactivity provided by this sophisticated device," said Rose Crane, chief executive officer of Epocrates. "We are committed to providing the most productive experience at the point of care, keeping physicians informed and focused on the patient rather than searching for answers."

'We are continuing to explore the advanced capabilities of the iPad and ways it can help Epocrates address the evolving healthcare technology needs."

Epocrates said that its medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians. The software has more than 275,000 physician subscribers using its software, available for iPhone, BlackBerry and Palm. More than 900,000 clinicians worldwide use Epocrates.

The company's software was featured by Apple at its iPhone Software Roadmap event in 2008. The Epocrates medical reference application was the first available on the App Store.



The study follows news earlier this week that some hospitals are looking at potential applications for the iPad. One San Francisco program, dubbed "Destination Bedside," aims to use tablets to provide X-rays, charts, prescriptions and notes to hospital workers at the touch of a finger.

The success of Apple's iPad in the medical field will likely depend on the creation of third-party applications for the device like Epocrates. In addition to a number of bundled applications, the iPad will have access to Apple's App Store, which now offers more than 140,000 different options.

The iPad has a starting price of $499 and is scheduled to ship by the end of March. The 3G-enabled version, which carries a $130 premium, should arrive a month later.

As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.
post #35 of 185
Hardly surprising - doctors in Australia were one of the last professions to computers (instead of patient cards.)
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post #36 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsmjds View Post

As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.

1) Welcome to the forum. Note that you don't have to quote the entire article.

2) There are EMR apps for the iPhone.

3) What do you mean it doesn't support Windows? There is evidence to suggest mounting it as a disk.
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post #37 of 185
This thing would be a dream to view medical data and images on! *__*

post #38 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

...

There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!

I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.

To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.

There are currently already nearly 3 Million Nurses.

There are probably ten times that in support personnel.

They all use Laptops in each room they are monitoring a patient. Each room has a portable station with XP updating records constantly.

Instead of each room having a laptop the Nurse will run around and push changes to the Relational Database System hospital wide thus covering their dozens of patients with reduced costs to the Hospitals.
post #39 of 185
I thought Windows had WiFi support?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsmjds View Post

As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.
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post #40 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one.

The other four chew trident.
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