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Amazon rethinking Kindle in the wake of Apple iPad

post #1 of 157
Thread Starter 
Amazon is being forced to rethink many of the design decisions of its Kindle e-book reader after the introduction of Apple's iPad.

The New York Times reported that Amazon assimilated multitouch screen maker Touchco into its Kindle engineering team last week; since then, it reports the Kindle group has posted over 50 job openings for positions related to hardware design.

Among the job postings is a Hardware Display Manager position, which asks that applicants "know the LCD business and key players in the market." Up to this point, Amazon has touted the Kindle's quirky e-ink screen as a major feature, promoting its readability and power savings that enable the device to coast for days without charging it.

If the next Kindle moves to conventional LCD screen technology, it will enable Amazon to keep up with the iPad in terms of displaying color, animation, and video. An LCD would also be required to support a touch interface, as e-ink isn't responsive enough to respond to touch gestures; the display lags even with the existing button controls.

Amazon's Kindle group is also looking for WiFi specialists, presumably to help move the product from being 3G-only (and tied to a bundled mobile plan) into a hybrid or even WiFi-only lineup. That might enable Amazon to lower the price for users who don't need to download books from anywhere, and who use their e-book reader within an area that already has WiFi service.

Other job postings support Amazon's recently unveiled Software Development Kit plans for Kindle, intended to create accessory applications for the product. Any apps will almost certainly require existing Kindle users to upgrade to new hardware, as the technical constraints of e-ink would greatly limit what kinds of useful apps developers could create.

Having to rebuild the Kindle from scratch in order to make it more competitive with the iPad as an e-reader would seem to be an expensive proposition for Amazon, particularly given the relatively minor sales it has achieved over the last two years. In developing an entirely new device, Amazon will also face competition from the conventional e-ink readers from Sony and Barns and Noble, leaving some analysts to speculate that the company will need to maintain an e-ink model.

The iPad splash

The announcement of Apple's iPad is having a similar impact on other company's products. For example, the iPad is forcing Acer to rethink what kind of tablet devices it could introduce for $500 in competition with Apple's existing iTunes infrastructure. Other netbook makers are also likely to feel the pinch once the similarly priced iPad hits consumers with new multitouch features, rich media playback on a larger screen, an iBooks shelf, and the ability to play large format games with rich interactivity.

Outside of consumer e-book readers and netbooks, the iPad is showing promise to replace custom devices in medicine and in education, two fields where tablet devices seemed to show promise but never really gained much traction.

The impact of the iPad on the plans of other manufacturers was foreshadowed by the iPhone, which entered the smartphone market at a time with everyone's offerings were dominated by mini-keyboards and small screens. Within a couple years, pundits changed their tune on how terrible the iPhone's virtual keyboard was and every manufacturer has since shifted its smartphone development to focus on large screen devices with touch interfaces in the shadow of the iPhone.
post #2 of 157
I don't know... I think eInk is still a pretty big deal. Huge benefits. But everything has it's pros and cons.

Personally... I think that once colour eInk come out... it would be perfect for an outdoor handheld GPS. I used them a lot for backpacking and search and rescue and they all have two big problems... short battery life very difficult to read outdoors. But I can't imagine Garmin ever being innovative enough to think of using a PixelQi or eInk screen.
post #3 of 157
I bet. Want a Kindle cheap? Take a look at eBay in eight weeks or so.
post #4 of 157
Renting of books is coming to the iPad and future Kindles, this is why the buy price shift upwards to make room for another set of prices at Amazon (the iBookStore will have a substantial head start of course), is my current estimation of what's going on.

Renting of e-books is a untapped market, the DRM needed to allow renting can be better enforced on a device with a totally different processor type like the A4 is.

"People don't read anymore" - Steve Jobs.

Says it all right there, he's addressing the issue of why people don't read, the high costs of books.

It costs something like 10% to print, 10% to distribute and 40% to retail a book. Apple is going to do it for 30%. Who knows what they will get for the untapped rental market, but publishers are more likely to get into renting and adjust prices to maximize profit in both, selling and renting, as they will have control over prices.

Sure some buying sales are going to be lost because of renting, but they are most likely figuring the huge untapped rental market is going to offset that small loss.

Quote:
The Audit Bureau of Circulations says U.S. magazine circulation dropped 2.2 percent in the second half of 2009. Sales at newsstands and other retail sites fell 9 percent, while paid subscriptions fell 1.1 percent.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=9779673


After the iBookStore success on the iPad, Apple is going to court more of the strict DRM movie studio types for their content.

The reason I say this is even on Netflix, there are a lot of movies you can only get via copy protected DVD's. No streaming what so ever, but perhaps with a closed system like the iPad they will think otherwise.

Unfortunately for us who already own a compuer, if you want to view any of this DRMed content, from the iBookStore or iTunes, you'll have to buy a iPad. Which will spur sales of the device to normal computer/Mac using folks who ordinarily wouldn't buy the device because of it's lack of features.

The oracle of Apple has spoken.
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post #5 of 157
Amazon is getting into the hardware business? And develop software to accompany it? They are asking for a world of hurt. They will blow through serious cash in R&D costs and any type of return on investment will be years away. My bet would be they will try for a couple years (at the most) and hundreds of millions of dollars later will realize they should have stuck with what they know best - selling stuff.
post #6 of 157
Even with 3G built in for the $489 price of a Kindle DX, I can't imagine they'll be selling too many of them once the iPad comes out. It (the iPad) simply represents a better value even at $629 with the 3G feature. That is assuming that you would consider the $489 price-point of the Kindle DX normal for such a device.
post #7 of 157
If I were Amazon, I'd do either of two things:

- Have a contract company design the Kindle for me (e.g. Toshiba, Samsung, etc.); or
- Aggressively push my content through the existing manufacturers (Apple, Sony, all those hundreds of other e-Readers without trademark stores).

But competing with Apple and Sony on hardware design - for that, you need some serious cojones, and loads of extra cash. Increasing headcount and building up new teams could be madness. Kindle, even its international model, doesn't excite me in the least. I keep reading the Amazon books on my iPhone...

Of course, there's always hope that even a book distributor could design some magical device...
post #8 of 157
Apple disrupting yet another business.... between Apple and Google, they've pretty much got it covered at this point.

I've got to be tearing my hair out wondering "what the heck do I do now," if I am a competitor or an affected industry.

A bit scary really. (And they have not even really got to the living room yet).
post #9 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takeo View Post

Personally... I think that once colour eInk come out... it would be perfect for an outdoor handheld GPS. I used them a lot for backpacking and search and rescue and they all have two big problems... short battery life very difficult to read outdoors. But I can't imagine Garmin ever being innovative enough to think of using a PixelQi or eInk screen.

You won't be benefiting from eInk much if you use it for GPS.

eBooks can last for days because it only uses battery when you turn a page (refresh). If you are an average reader you'll be turning pages every minute or so. GPS have to refresh the eInk display at least every second or so. So on average it will have to divide up a regular eBook reader's battery life by 60, then you'll have a better idea of how long an eInk display based GPS will last.

In kindle's case, it says it'll last up to 7 days. If you divide that by 60, that's about 2.8 hours.
post #10 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Many consumers want a device that has a single purpose and performs that purpose well.

Many do, but many don't, too. Don't deny it, all e-ink device sales are hurt because most people want something that does more than one thing well and most people don't like e-ink because it doesn't display text as good as a book. You'll say I'm wrong despite Amazon's reactionary tactics being proof enough of what is coming.
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post #11 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The only thing Apple has managed to do with the iPad is raise the cost of EBooks. Right now the iPad is better known for what it can't do rather then what it can. Not exactly innovative.

Competition "raised" the cost because 9.99 is artificially set by Amazon. They are losing money on each ebook sale. Publishers will not feel the need to drop the price (until Amazon have a monopoly on the market and renegotiate).

In a situation where price's not artificially set, competition will most certainly bring the price down.

So yeah, instead of blaming Apple for entering the market, you should be thanking them for breaking Amazon's monopoly, and bringing real market economy to the eBook market.
post #12 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

...The Kindle is a far better ereader simply based on is screen technology compared to the iPad. For ereading using a EPD display is far better then an LCD/LED.

According to what I read, the iPad has the same type screen as a recent MacBook, which I set one up for someone and it was absolutely horrible to use as a e-reader.

Unfortunately, the combination of the Reality Distortion Effect, Apple clever marketing with free publicity, more features, the "oh shiny, must have" glossy screen effect and so on, will overwhelm consumers common sense and reason as usual.

So the iPad will sell well, despite the Kindle having a easier on the eyes, type screen, the only thing it has going for it. ("Direct all iPad glossy screen haters to the Kindle" - a future Phil Schiller comment perhaps?)

Perhaps the NEXT Kindle will beat the iPad, but it has a long way to go to match what Apple already has already established.

And the reason Amazon is pursuing the Kindle is given by my signature...
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post #13 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

"People don't read anymore" - Steve Jobs.

Says it all right there, he's addressing the issue of why people don't read, the high costs of books.

He was embelishing, to put it most kindly. Publishing is bigger in revenue than music and movies combined. At least it was when he said that. But he can't say that, because that wouldn't sabotage Amazon's efforts.


Regarding 2H2009, one data point is not much to go by, especially during a recession.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Many do, but many don't, too. Don't deny it, all e-ink device sales are hurt because most people want something that does more than one thing well and most people don't like e-ink because it doesn't display text as good as a book. You'll say I'm wrong despite Amazon's reactionary tactics being proof enough of what is coming.

Kindle does have a higher ppi, though the screen is a little smaller. But yes, the trend is convergence. iPad converges more functions into one device and I think does a lot better of a job of it than the Kindle. It's kind of too bad, I would prefer not to have an emissive screen, but you sacrifice a lot with non-emissive screens.
post #14 of 157
Jobs must have stock in Visions Eyecare or something because of his stupid decision to sell glossy only screens. Moronic is an understatement!
post #15 of 157
Color will help the Kindle display... color. But matching the iPad for animation and video requires more: a fast CPU, fast graphics core, mass storage and an OS to match the graphics abilities of OS X.
post #16 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Some members on this forum keep saying that but it couldn't be further from the truth. Many consumers want a device that has a single purpose and performs that purpose well

Many? who's "many"?

We're moving toward device convergence/multipurpose devices. That's the reality.

Anyway, Amazon needs to rethink the entire e-book reader paradigm from the ground up. Or else their main distributor will be eBay.
post #17 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Jobs must have stock in Visions Eyecare or something because of his stupid decision to sell glossy only screens. Moronic is an understatement!

Nearly every netbook on the market has a glossy screen. Nearly every major smartphone on the market has a glossy screen. And people are buying. Glossy is a reality. Don't like it? Ask yourself why people keep buying.
post #18 of 157
And Amazon is going to have to rethink how it interacts with the iPad platform and bring added value to it or bet the corporation on competing against the iPad with a replacement to the Kindle.
post #19 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

And Amazon is going to have to rethink how it interacts with the iPad platform and bring added value to it or bet the corporation on competing against the iPad with a replacement to the Kindle.

Amazon can't afford to lose the ebook wars to Apple. Ebooks are a far bigger part of Amazon's business. All that's about to change, however.

Apple will do to ebooks what they did to music, and Steve's strategy is far smarter this time around.
post #20 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

He was embelishing, to put it most kindly. Publishing is bigger in revenue than music and movies combined. At least it was when he said that. But he can't say that, because that wouldn't sabotage Amazon's efforts.



Regarding 2H2009, one data point is not much to go by, especially during a recession...



Well a lot of people have had their disposable income reduced in favor of underwater mortgages and inflation. Going to take some time to flush it out of the economy.

A iPad could be a justified expense if it brings a wealth of inexpensive content and kills a lot of idle time people now find they have on their hands not working.


Another marketing thought: Subscription e-newspapers and magazines

Should be even less expensive than a paper subscription...which is pretty cheap already, some at 50¢ a copy. Might not be uncommon for people to be subscribed to several newspapers daily, being able to skim through them quickly using the iPad.

I see so much iPad potential, it has a very very promising future, provided the content is inexpensive.
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post #21 of 157
Competition is good. I thought the Kindle was a bit ugly by design, but I'm sure the functionality is good. I'm not saying the iPad is much better though. I can't get over that thick bezel.
post #22 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Nearly every netbook on the market has a glossy screen. Nearly every major smartphone on the market has a glossy screen. And people are buying. Glossy is a reality. Don't like it? Ask yourself why people keep buying.

People like shiny things? Prevalence doesn't automatically equal good. Windows is more prevalent than Macs.
post #23 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Renting of books is coming to the iPad and future Kindles, this is why the buy price shift upwards to make room for another set of prices at Amazon (the iBookStore will have a substantial head start of course), is my current estimation of what's going on.

Renting of e-books is a untapped market, the DRM needed to allow renting can be better enforced on a device with a totally different processor type like the A4 is.

"People don't read anymore" - Steve Jobs.

Says it all right there, he's addressing the issue of why people don't read, the high costs of books.

It costs something like 10% to print, 10% to distribute and 40% to retail a book. Apple is going to do it for 30%. Who knows what they will get for the untapped rental market, but publishers are more likely to get into renting and adjust prices to maximize profit in both, selling and renting, as they will have control over prices.

Sure some buying sales are going to be lost because of renting, but they are most likely figuring the huge untapped rental market is going to offset that small loss.



http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=9779673


After the iBookStore success on the iPad, Apple is going to court more of the strict DRM movie studio types for their content.

The reason I say this is even on Netflix, there are a lot of movies you can only get via copy protected DVD's. No streaming what so ever, but perhaps with a closed system like the iPad they will think otherwise.

Unfortunately for us who already own a compuer, if you want to view any of this DRMed content, from the iBookStore or iTunes, you'll have to buy a iPad. Which will spur sales of the device to normal computer/Mac using folks who ordinarily wouldn't buy the device because of it's lack of features.

The oracle of Apple has spoken.

You are wrong on SO many of your points.

The costs of publishing are not easily translated into percentages. Average sales price varies over time, editing, design, proofing, author advance, etc are all fixed costs. These often amount to well over 100% of the revenue from the sale of a book.

Jobs did not say that people don't read because books are expensive.

Renting isn't a good model for books. I sometimes read a book in one evening, sometimes it takes weeks. You can't effectively limit the rental period. Also, since book prices drop significantly over time (eBooks will now that iTunes has entered the game) why would anyone rent when they will be able to get the book for a few dollars in six months time?

I have no idea why you think that a different processor would be required for DRM. If my iPhone can manage it, I'm sure ay processor will do.

There is no reason (that I know of) to believe that you wont be able to read Apple ebooks on any machine authorized to your iTunes account.

If I might suggest some reading for you:

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog...outsiders.html

And

http://www.tobiasbuckell.com/2010/01...le-via-amazon/

Which contains a great breakdown of the costing issues with eBooks.
post #24 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The Kindle hasn't been hurt at all in fact durning the Holiday season it did very well. The only thing I would say is wrong is for someone to think the iPad is going to make a better ereader then the Kindle. Sorry but an LCD/LED screen is about the worst option for ereading. Good luck for anyone sitting outside trying to read with that.

1) Never said it would be a better eReader. I said that it would be popular. Convenience always wins.

2) You're talking about December 2009 as Holiday season? Um, the iPad was announced 2 weeks ago.
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post #25 of 157
There is no reason for Kindle's demise. Reduce the cost, offer touch screen and saving documents in pdf as long has been suggested. You can also develop a higher priced Kindle offering some of the same technology as the iPad. The lower priced Kindle will suit readers who don't need all of the extras and read mostly novels and text only books. The advanced Kindle can offer interactive and highly illustrated type books.
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post #26 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Well a lot of people have had their disposable income reduced in favor of underwater mortgages and inflation. Going to take some time to flush it out of the economy.

A iPad could be a justified expense if it brings a wealth of inexpensive content and kills a lot of idle time people now find they have on their hands not working.

Another marketing thought: Subscription e-newspapers and magazines

Should be even less expensive than a paper subscription...which is pretty cheap already, some at 50¢ a copy. Might not be uncommon for people to be subscribed to several newspapers daily, being able to skim through them quickly using the iPad.

I see so much iPad potential, it has a very very promising future, provided the content is inexpensive.

I agree on most of this, though people in financial trouble shouldn't be trying to justify an iPad until their troubles pass. But that still leaves quite a lot of people that may be able to try something new.

If it's done well, I think iPad may be a boon to subscriptions. A lot of magazines are so inexpensive that the subscriber's payment roughly covers the cost of mailing, and then there isn't the publishing expense. Maybe there can be an option for free with ads, or pay a certain amount for the version with no ads.
post #27 of 157
Originally Posted by pondosinatra
Jobs must have stock in Visions Eyecare or something because of his stupid decision to sell glossy only screens. Moronic is an understatement!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Nearly every netbook on the market has a glossy screen. Nearly every major smartphone on the market has a glossy screen. And people are buying. Glossy is a reality. Don't like it? Ask yourself why people keep buying.

My 17" MBP has a glossy screen and wouldn't have it any other way. Sharper image and better colors. Glare has not been a problem for me. Most of the laptops that I see in stores and office stationary suppliers have glossy screens. If you need matt, I'm sure that there will be a third party screen protectors--but glossy is better. So I agree with Quadra 610 and suggest that if the glare bothers you either don't buy, use a screen protector or 600 grit sandpaper might do the trick.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #28 of 157
Amazon competing with Apple is a losing proposition. The direction to go for the Kindle is to add a few nice things for avid readers, and continue to drive the price of the thing down. If a Kindle was $100, who wouldn't want one?

In tripping over themselves to match the iPad, Amazon is going to let B&N's Nook overtake the eReader market. It's sleek, has a nice touch interface, and keeps getting faster/easier to use with each firmware update.
post #29 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

So I agree with Quadra 610 and suggest that if the glare bothers you either don't buy, use a screen protector or 600 grit sandpaper might do the trick.

Removing the superfluous piece of glass would do even better all around.
post #30 of 157
The Kindle and the iPad are not direct competitors. They are different products targeting different audiences.

Amazon is not rethinking the Kindle due to the iPad. Its primary competition is the Barnes & Noble nook and the Sony e-book readers, as well as new e-ink devices announced last month at CES.
post #31 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTMP View Post

Renting isn't a good model for books. I sometimes read a book in one evening, sometimes it takes weeks. You can't effectively limit the rental period. Also, since book prices drop significantly over time (eBooks will now that iTunes has entered the game) why would anyone rent when they will be able to get the book for a few dollars in six months time?

Perhaps there could be a Netflix model for renting, which could solve the rental time issue. Maybe you pay full price up-front, but get credits back to the elibrary when you return a book. I think there are creative ways of distributing that have not yet been explored that could be successful.

Also, the point of being able to purchase or rent a book from anywhere is a reason to own an ereader, so what's so attractive about waiting six months for a book's price to drop and then going to the book store to purchase a bound copy?
post #32 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihxo View Post

Competition "raised" the cost because 9.99 is artificially set by Amazon. They are losing money on each ebook sale. Publishers will not feel the need to drop the price (until Amazon have a monopoly on the market and renegotiate).

In a situation where price's not artificially set, competition will most certainly bring the price down.

So yeah, instead of blaming Apple for entering the market, you should be thanking them for breaking Amazon's monopoly, and bringing real market economy to the eBook market.

Now subsitute Apple for Amazon, .99cents instead of 9.99, and iPods/Itunes for Kindles and what do you get?
post #33 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Nearly every netbook on the market has a glossy screen. Nearly every major smartphone on the market has a glossy screen. And people are buying. Glossy is a reality. Don't like it? Ask yourself why people keep buying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Removing the superfluous piece of glass would do even better all around.

But then it would not be a touch screen--would it?
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post #34 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

Now subsitute Apple for Amazon, .99cents instead of 9.99, and iPods/Itunes for Kindles and what do you get?

Basically the same thing.

The only thing different is books are not songs. Songs are mostly about 4-6 minutes long, really hard to quantify how good or bad it is. Unlike books you have some with 50 pages, and book with 500+ pages. there are niche books (medical books) that sells for significantly more than regular book because the buyers don't have a better choice. Then there are text book which cost somewhere from 99 cents to $500+ depending on which subject you are looking for.

What happens with $9.99 is, many of these books will have to be cut into many volumes in order to get it closer to their expected price, or not release an ebook version at all.
post #35 of 157
Seriously. They weren't even trying. They put out a weakly designed, over-priced product, and didn't move fast enough to innovate. Now they're scrambling as a result.

If they want to save the Kindle (if that's even possible), they'll need to get AGGRESSIVE in pricing and marketing and hope they can get it in enough hands that they can build it up from there. Otherwise, they are lost.

And I'm talking $99/149 (regular)- $199/249 (dx) aggressive. They need to market it as an inexpensive, single-purpose device.

They knew this was coming, and they sat still about it.
post #36 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The only thing Apple has managed to do with the iPad is raise the cost of EBooks. Right now the iPad is better known for what it can't do rather then what it can. Not exactly innovative.

That's not true in either sense.

MacMillian, for example does want higher prices on NEW books that are coming out in hardcover, but they have stated that they want book pricing to start at $4.99. Right now, Amazon doesn't have a viable scheme for book selling. As has been reported in the Times and WSJ, they pay half the list price for a hardcover, but charge $9.95. That can't last. In addition, most books Amazon "sells" are free. So they are losing big time in order to increase marketshare.

Their numbers are worthless because even though they say they "sold" 60% as many e-books as "real" books during the holidays, they refuse to say how many were paid. The estimates are that not more that 20% were.

So what will happen? Amazon would either bring the hammer down on publishers, and drop the price they pay to about $7, so that they could make a small profit, or even further, so that they could make a decent one. Authors will get hit here too.

Or, sooner or later, they would have to raise the prices.

Apple is being more realistic. Publishers have to make most of their money back with the hardcover. Then they come out with cheaper editions.

You may not know what the iPad can do, but it seems as though many others do.
post #37 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Amazon can't afford to lose the ebook wars to Apple. Ebooks are a far bigger part of Amazon's business. All that's about to change, however.

Apple will do to ebooks what they did to music, and Steve's strategy is far smarter this time around.

If Amazon is thinking of competing with Apple on this it will be a big mistake. Unless they have some insider knowledge that the iPad won't allow the Kindle application. Otherwise, what will they gain by selling hardware? That's a dangerous proposition. I'm not saying that they wont succeed. Possibly they could. After all, it was said that Apple couldn't succeed at phones.

But this seems riskier. If they can sell books on the iPad, then this seems to be a waste. If they're looking at Sony and B&N as their competitors, that's a different ballgame, and they may succeed against them.
post #38 of 157
And the ones who will benefit most at this point in time are the publishers.

If they cut their cost to print books, and put that money in their pockets, good for them BAD for writers. This will be just like the music industry before long.

And if they don't have to print as many books more folks out of work - Bad

If they don't have to print as many books good for us and our forest - Good

The iPad and other products will also create a new medical practice - it will be an extension of carpel tunnel, maybe "fingertip flatten eyeist".

If you can't feel anything in your fingers, will it still feel good to a women?

Oh, well. If nothing else, Apple is great for rumors and speculation.

Skip
post #39 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_daze View Post

Perhaps there could be a Netflix model for renting, which could solve the rental time issue. Maybe you pay full price up-front, but get credits back to the elibrary when you return a book. I think there are creative ways of distributing that have not yet been explored that could be successful.

Also, the point of being able to purchase or rent a book from anywhere is a reason to own an ereader, so what's so attractive about waiting six months for a book's price to drop and then going to the book store to purchase a bound copy?

Interesting idea. You're right, that plan (credits upon returning) might work.

I was reffering to ebooks.
The publishers want the pricing model for ebooks to be the same as for print. All of those that have talked about it say that the $15.99 price will only be for new releases. They want to be able to drop the price down over time to $4.99 or lower.
post #40 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Amazon is getting into the hardware business? And develop software to accompany it? They are asking for a world of hurt. They will blow through serious cash in R&D costs and any type of return on investment will be years away. My bet would be they will try for a couple years (at the most) and hundreds of millions of dollars later will realize they should have stuck with what they know best - selling stuff.

Completely agree with you. Bezos seems to be afflicted with a little hubris. Hope he snaps out of it soon. There is no way in hell Amazon will be able to compete with Apple. Especially if they're branching out into LCD screens as reported elsewhere. Even if they somehow miraculously acquire the technical knowhow, they'll be hard-pressed to secure component prices that Apple, with its enormous volumes, are able to negotiate. Shoot, forget about prices, there might not even be enough supply for them After Apple nails down its long term supply deals.
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