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Amazon rethinking Kindle in the wake of Apple iPad - Page 2

post #41 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

But then it would not be a touch screen--would it?

You're right, I was thinking about the Macs. Which is true, it's an extra piece of glass that is between the user and the real screen. Something that people forget is that it is possible to have more aggressive glare reduction and still have a smooth, clear screen. Clearer than a glossy screen, in fact.
post #42 of 157
Does amazon really have to worry that much? In the music world it's them taking Market share from apple, why shouldn't they be able to retain their Market share in books. Also I'm not into ebooks but everything I hear refers to everyone making ebook readers and apple calls there books iBooks. Does that mean they will only ever work on an ipad? If so then that's a huge reason to go with amazon.

Also if amazon really want to compete on hardware I think they could. After all apple buy a lot of the parts that make up the iPhone. All the really cool things like multi touch arnt owned bt them. What's really there to stop anyone doing it as well? The fact that others haven't I think is more down to the idea that to beat is a costly war, but to get every other buyer by spending a lot less will make a lot with lower risk.
post #43 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTMP View Post

Renting isn't a good model for books. I sometimes read a book in one evening, sometimes it takes weeks. You can't effectively limit the rental period.


Yes you can, by basing the rental period upon the time it takes to read the book not on a flat time.

You have to turn a page to bring it into view right? As long as one doesn't turn the pages the unread content can exist on the device for as long as necessary.

Anything is possible really.


Quote:
Also, since book prices drop significantly over time (eBooks will now that iTunes has entered the game) why would anyone rent when they will be able to get the book for a few dollars in six months time?

Well the prices for buying e-books just went up on Amazon, the publishers wouldn't have to drop their prices if people had the choice to rent first, then decide to buy at a discount later if they wanted to keep the content.

The e-books and the internet lends itself to a more structured price system that being forced to "move" paper books because it's taking up room etc., like traditional book stores.

Quote:
I have no idea why you think that a different processor would be required for DRM. If my iPhone can manage it, I'm sure any processor will do.

A custom processor could make breaking the DRM rented content files a bit harder than usual, especially with a mandatory internet connection verifying the condition of the processor/iPad etc.


Quote:
There is no reason (that I know of) to believe that you wont be able to read Apple ebooks on any machine authorized to your iTunes account.


Some textbooks are incredibly expensive, college students would be quick to copy the content if allowed on the traditional computer platforms. But on a iPad, with Apple controlling both the Apps, the hardware and the processor, could make a effective stratagem to keep paid or rented content on the iPad.
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post #44 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

So if its not a better ereading in your opinion, which is the same as mine why are all these pinheads on this forum talking about the Kindle ending up on Ebay? Not that you were feeding into that but it was the point I was trying to make in this thread.

You're doing it again . . .
post #45 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The Kindle hasn't been hurt at all in fact durning the Holiday season it did very well. The only thing I would say is wrong is for someone to think the iPad is going to make a better ereader then the Kindle. Sorry but an LCD/LED screen is about the worst option for ereading. Good luck for anyone sitting outside trying to read with that.

The problem is that no one knows how well the Kindle did, as Amazon refuses to ever mention how many were sold. They say it was the best selling something or other, and that's a problem too, because they also refuse to define the category it's competing in.

We're seeing numbers of between 2 and 3 million sold since the first one came out in 2007, but thats just a guess as well. It's also not very much, and that's almost all for the standard one, not the DX.

As far as e-ink vs LCD goes; I think that's propaganda from E-ink and the companies who use their product. There has been no real, controlled study done anywhere that been released as yet that is aimed at finding that out. Hopefully, there will be one.

But a lot of nonsense is abounding. First of all, we use our computers for hours at a time, and I'm willing to bet that very few have headaches or eyestrain at the end of the day from that. It's been shown that problems are mostly caused by poor posture, bad overhead lighting, screens being too high, etc. I've been reading books on my phones for years without a problem, and I'm not the only one by far.

The eye and brain don't know where a photon of light comes from. It can't tell if the photon is reflected or transmitted. It makes no sense to even think that it does. This is one of those myths that gets repeated as one person hears it from another who heard it from another.

If the screen is too bright, you can turn it down. Book readers on the iPhone allow that, as well as inverting the screen, adjusting the type and background separately, etc. After my several eye operations, when I was away from here for almost two months, the only thing I could read from was my iPhone. I couldn't read newspapers, magazines, watch Tv, use the computer, or even go outside. By adjusting the font size, background darkness, and type darkness, I was able to read. I doubt I could have even seen the type on a Kindle though.

I believe it's a big mistake to assume that reading on this will be difficult. Those who have Kindles are assuming that will be the case, but I don't believe it.
post #46 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by timgriff84 View Post

Does amazon really have to worry that much? In the music world it's them taking Market share from apple, why shouldn't they be able to retain their Market share in books. Also I'm not into ebooks but everything I hear refers to everyone making ebook readers and apple calls there books iBooks. Does that mean they will only ever work on an ipad? If so then that's a huge reason to go with amazon.

Also if amazon really want to compete on hardware I think they could. After all apple buy a lot of the parts that make up the iPhone. All the really cool things like multi touch arnt owned bt them. What's really there to stop anyone doing it as well? The fact that others haven't I think is more down to the idea that to beat is a costly war, but to get every other buyer by spending a lot less will make a lot with lower risk.

It's only natural that the second player to the market takes market share from the first. If one company has a virtual monopoly on a market and another company joins the market, they take market share from the first company the moment they sell a single product. The fact that Amazon has taken a little market share from Apple in the music market should be in no means comforting to them with respect to the ebook market as the roles are reversed and Apple has a stronger product offering in the iPad and its bookstore than Amazon did when it entered the music market.
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post #47 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

And the ones who will benefit most at this point in time are the publishers.

If they cut their cost to print books, and put that money in their pockets, good for them BAD for writers. This will be just like the music industry before long.

And if they don't have to print as many books more folks out of work - Bad

If they don't have to print as many books good for us and our forest - Good

The iPad and other products will also create a new medical practice - it will be an extension of carpel tunnel, maybe "fingertip flatten eyeist".

If you can't feel anything in your fingers, will it still feel good to a women?

Oh, well. If nothing else, Apple is great for rumors and speculation.

Skip

Authors get about 25% of the price of a book. If Amazon ends up cutting the price down to make a profit, everyone will get reduced.

Apple's pricing model is better for everyone long term.
post #48 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTMP View Post

Interesting idea. You're right, that plan (credits upon returning) might work.

I was reffering to ebooks.
The publishers want the pricing model for ebooks to be the same as for print. All of those that have talked about it say that the $15.99 price will only be for new releases. They want to be able to drop the price down over time to $4.99 or lower.

It's actually $12.99 to $14.99 in the beginning.
post #49 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The Kindle hasn't been hurt at all in fact durning the Holiday season it did very well.

How can you make that statement when Amazon hasn't released any sales figures?
post #50 of 157
I have a Kindle that my family bought for me for Christmas. I read maybe 4 or 5 books a year and a period of a month or 2 may pass between one book and the next. Right now, my Kindle has been sitting on the night stand, unused for the last month and a half. I'm sure a lot of people read all the time, but for the person who doesn't, it's kind of a waste.

I'm sure that when I buy an iPad, it will probably be used everyday. I mean, I like to browse a lot in the evening, as well as use it for my work during the day. I can download my local newspaper right now in pdf format and read it on a computer. I don't do this very much now, because the computer is in my office and not at the kitchen table, where I like to read the paper in the morning. So, this is one use I plan on taking advantage of. The pdf format is exactly like the newspaper I get every morning, ads and all, and I could have it sent to my iPad every morning for less cost. Ditto for several magazines that I subscribe to.(if they become available digitally)

It doesn't make any difference to me if it's E ink or not, except I do think color makes things more interesting and pleasing to read.

For practically the same price, you can get an iPad. It will do so much more than a Kindle, I really don't think there's a comparison. You can only compare one aspect between the two. Also, maybe it's just me, but navigating in the Kindle is kind of a minor pain.
post #51 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

...But a lot of nonsense is abounding. First of all, we use our computers for hours at a time, and I'm willing to bet that very few have headaches or eyestrain at the end of the day from that. It's been shown that problems are mostly caused by poor posture, bad overhead lighting, screens being too high, etc. I've been reading books on my phones for years without a problem, and I'm not the only one by far.

Yes, many other issues can cause distress when using a computer screen for long periods of time.

However one that didn't exist with LCD matte screens was glare and reflections.


Quote:
The eye and brain don't know where a photon of light comes from. It can't tell if the photon is reflected or transmitted. It makes no sense to even think that it does. This is one of those myths that gets repeated as one person hears it from another who heard it from another.

Your right, what also happens is the reflection image is ever so slightly out of focus than the computer image that the eyes keep refocusing between the two, this causes the eye muscle strain which then leads to headaches and premature eye muscle fatigue, requiring glasses to compensate.

Quote:
If the screen is too bright, you can turn it down. Book readers on the iPhone allow that, as well as inverting the screen, adjusting the type and background separately, etc. After my several eye operations, when I was away from here for almost two months, the only thing I could read from was my iPhone. I couldn't read newspapers, magazines, watch Tv, use the computer, or even go outside. By adjusting the font size, background darkness, and type darkness, I was able to read. I doubt I could have even seen the type on a Kindle though.

You were able to adjust the size of the type on the iPhone, thus making it easier to focus.

Also the iPhone has a small surface area, it reflects little because of that reason. Once the screen size and the computer image your viewing starts increasing, the glare and reflections get harder and harder to control.

Quote:
I believe it's a big mistake to assume that reading on this will be difficult. Those who have Kindles are assuming that will be the case, but I don't believe it.


Reading on the glossy screen iPad will be difficult for those vulnerable to glare and reflections, this will be revealed later on as people try to take the iPad to various locations, like the MacBook Pro's, which Apple did bring back anti-glare options.

Schools might also come across the problems with glossy screens in the classrooms, which are often brightly lit.

If so, Apple will just have to make some changes or anti-glare screens applied, the iPad will continue for those who don't have a issue.
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post #52 of 157
I wonder what these guy are going to do:

http://www.iliadreader.co.uk/product...FV1d4wodzxggIA

Their 10" model retails at £600 ($955 at today's exchange rate). That's way more than KindleDX, but at least they allowed open standards.

To match the features and functions of the iPad, Amazon is going to have to go with what already exists, Windows7, Windows7Mobile or Android because there is no way Amazon is going to commit many millions to R&D, its own processors and OS no matter how big the ebook market is or will likely become.
post #53 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Yes, many other issues can cause distress when using a computer screen for long periods of time.

However one that didn't exist with LCD matte screens was glare and reflections.

Most people seem to prefer glossy screens. When manufacturers began offering them a few years ago, they were surprised at the popularity. People have been reading from those screens ever since. With a large display, it may be difficult to move it, but not a small portable one such as this, with no keyboard attached to the bottom.

Quote:
Your right, what also happens is the reflection image is ever so slightly out of focus than the computer image that the eyes keep refocusing between the two, this causes the eye muscle strain which then leads to headaches and premature eye muscle fatigue, requiring glasses to compensate.

In that case, the Kindle must be harder to read from, as the screen requires reflected light. LCD's don't.

Quote:
You were able to adjust the size of the type on the iPhone, thus making it easier to focus.

It wasn't just focus. It was great light sensitivity. I could hardly go outdoors even with the special sunglasses the doctor provided and a hat. I just barely made it to the hospital for the visits.

Quote:
Also the iPhone has a small surface area, it reflects little because of that reason. Once the screen size and the computer image your viewing starts increasing, the glare and reflections get harder and harder to control.

This isn't nearly as large as my monitor. A fraction of the size. If I could have adjusted the parameters, it would have worked out well.

Quote:
Reading on the glossy screen iPad will be difficult for those vulnerable to glare and reflections, this will be revealed later on as people try to take the iPad to various locations, like the MacBook Pro's, which Apple did bring back anti-glare options.

I really don't see that as a problem. We have two 24" iMacs here, both glossy, neither has the slightest problems with reflections. And, as I said, glossy screen notebooks are the most popular, even when matt is an option.

Quote:
Schools might also come across the problems with glossy screens in the classrooms, which are often brightly lit.

Schools are happily using iMacs and Macbooks, all with glossy screens for several years now without a problem. Most of the Dells sold there also have glossy screens. I've never heard anyone complain about it in all the technical computer work I've done in the NYC school system.

Quote:
If so, Apple will just have to make some changes or anti-glare screens applied, the iPad will continue for those who don't have a issue.

People make too much of that. Again, most people prefer glossy screens, glare or not.
post #54 of 157
Least we forget, Google books. Google may also be planing an eBook device--just speculations, but they are entering the smart phone arena.
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post #55 of 157
The iPad dispute (why you think you dont like it)
http://modthatmac.wordpress.com/2010...-dont-like-it/
post #56 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by sip View Post

I wonder what these guy are going to do:

http://www.iliadreader.co.uk/product...FV1d4wodzxggIA

Their 10" model retails at £600 ($955 at today's exchange rate). That's way more than KindleDX, but at least they allowed open standards.

To match the features and functions of the iPad, Amazon is going to have to go with what already exists, Windows7, Windows7Mobile or Android because there is no way Amazon is going to commit many millions to R&D, its own processors and OS no matter how big the ebook market is or will likely become.

We can likely rule out Win 7. There's no way Amazon will be making a tablet based on that. No one will buy it. It's proven to be immensely unpopular. Way too complex. And then Amazon will have to support Windows. Uh uh.

It will have to be a more advanced version of the Linux it's using now, or one of the proliferating versions of Android. 1.5, 1.6, 2.0, or 2.1. Take your pick. Dell is coming out with a 5" tablet in a few months that will be using the old, non upgradable 1.5, so maybe that's what Amazon will also use.
post #57 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

There is no reason for Kindle's demise. Reduce the cost, offer touch screen and saving documents in pdf as long has been suggested. You can also develop a higher priced Kindle offering some of the same technology as the iPad. The lower priced Kindle will suit readers who don't need all of the extras and read mostly novels and text only books. The advanced Kindle can offer interactive and highly illustrated type books.

Yeah. Simple, isn't it?
post #58 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Most people seem to prefer glossy screens. When manufacturers began offering them a few years ago, they were surprised at the popularity. People have been reading from those screens ever since. With a large display, it may be difficult to move it, but not a small portable one such as this, with no keyboard attached to the bottom.

Yes, most people do prefer glossy screens, however it's a shame a large portion of the population has such trouble with them as they did with the glossy CRT screens thus the "hoods" and anti-glare filters of old.

The iPad might be able to escape some the reflections because it's held in the hand and thus can be turned this way and that. But the higher the ambient light, the harder it will be to do that.



Quote:
In that case, the Kindle must be harder to read from, as the screen requires reflected light. LCD's don't.

If you say, I'm not familiar with the device or it's screen, perhaps it uses reflected light but not the reflected images, two different things I think.



Quote:
It wasn't just focus. It was great light sensitivity. I could hardly go outdoors even with the special sunglasses the doctor provided and a hat. I just barely made it to the hospital for the visits.

Well I'm glad your better I hope, I'm just starting to have trouble with my eyes, reading glasses keep needing to be increased, it's so terrible and a pain having glasses in the car, on the counters etc. My father has coke bottle glasses now, he's been using glossy CRT's for years.



Quote:
I really don't see that as a problem. We have two 24" iMacs here, both glossy, neither has the slightest problems with reflections. And, as I said, glossy screen notebooks are the most popular, even when matt is an option.

With the desktop models you can usually adjust the ambient light to reduce the reflections, it's harder with a portable model.

And people are attracted to the glossy, Apple sells a lot because the anti-glare option is usually a build to order option.


Quote:
Schools are happily using iMacs and Macbooks, all with glossy screens for several years now without a problem. Most of the Dells sold there also have glossy screens. I've never heard anyone complain about it in all the technical computer work I've done in the NYC school system.

Not all schools, and yes, it's a industry wide problem. Such a shame.

http://www.hrd.qut.edu.au/healthsafe.../highGloss.jsp



Quote:
People make too much of that. Again, most people prefer glossy screens, glare or not.

True, but a lot of computer users tend to be young, with good eyes and ignorant minds.

Look at the iPod volume control issue right? Later on people will find out, also there are a lot of wealthy post baby boomer retiring, who need something to do rather than being carted to the local indian casinos.

A computer could help a lot of them remain active, but their eyes need the extra softness and less strain.


And to note, I do like the glossy displays, the image is cleaner and clearer, however if Apple could get rid of the glare and reflections (using special glass that's <1% surface reflective) perhaps it could make a glossy screen even better.

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post #59 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by modthatmac View Post

The iPad dispute (why you think you dont like it)
http://modthatmac.wordpress.com/2010...-dont-like-it/


Nice to see you're reading my posts .... and even better, getting enough out of it to write a blog.... how original. You'll notice the date of my writings.... you're welcome!

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post #60 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Some members on this forum keep saying that but it couldn't be further from the truth. Many consumers want a device that has a single purpose and performs that purpose well. The Kindle is a far better ereader simply based on is screen technology compared to the iPad. For ereading using a EPD display is far better then an LCD/LED.

There wouldnt be any reason for consumers to sell their Kindle even if they were going to by an iPad.

You may bee 100% correct, but obviously Amazon doesn't agree, because they 'blinked.' Sounds like they are either completely or at the very least partially planning to abandon their current Kindle tech and upgrade to compete with the iPad. Now Google is talking of putting out a tablet to compete with Apple. Fascinating how Apple forces others to follow their lead and bend to their technology in part out of fear of losing market share or not looking 'cool', not vice versa.
post #61 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

As far as e-ink vs LCD goes; I think that's propaganda from E-ink and the companies who use their product. There has been no real, controlled study done anywhere that been released as yet that is aimed at finding that out. Hopefully, there will be one.

I actually own an ebook reader with an e-ink display and I can categorically state that e-ink is better than LCD for reading.
post #62 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Yes, most people do prefer glossy screens, however it's a shame a large portion of the population has such trouble with them as they did with the glossy CRT screens thus the "hoods" and anti-glare filters of old.

It's an assumption on your part that so many people have problems with them. Ignorance is always a problem, but I can't help it if some people are not trying to position their screens properly. It's not that difficult.

Quote:
The iPad might be able to escape some the reflections because it's held in the hand and thus can be turned this way and that. But the higher the ambient light, the harder it will be to do that.

I don't think it's much of a problem. The minority who doesn't want them always seems to think it is, but it isn't. Really.

Quote:
If you say, I'm not familiar with the device or it's screen, perhaps it uses reflected light but not the reflected images, two different things I think.

E-ink is a technology that uses tiny balls that are half white, and half black. They are suspended in a liquid. When charged one way, the white faces up. Charged another way, and the black faces up. there is no light emitted by the screen, and no backlight. It entirely depends upon reflected light. The brighter the better. The angle of the light matters as well. In very bright outdoor light, it almost appears to be black and white. In dimmer light, it appears to be very light grey against very dark grey. In even dimmer light indoors, it appears to be light grey against dark grey. In dim light, it appears to be a light medium grey against a medium dark grey. And of course, with no light, it doesn't appear at all.

Quote:
Well I'm glad your better I hope, I'm just starting to have trouble with my eyes, reading glasses keep needing to be increased, it's so terrible and a pain having glasses in the car, on the counters etc. My father has coke bottle glasses now, he's been using glossy CRT's for years.

Thanks. As our eyes get worse, e-ink becomes less tenable as it's too limited in its variation. Besides, realistically, how many people would prefer a grey scale screen as opposed to full color?

Your father's eyes aren't bad because he used glossy monitors.

Quote:
With the desktop models you can usually adjust the ambient light to reduce the reflections, it's harder with a portable model.

You said the opposite above.


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And people are attracted to the glossy, Apple sells a lot because the anti-glare option is usually a build to order option.

PC companies were selling glossy monitors years before Apple adopted the idea. Apple only began to sell them long after they became so popular.

Quote:
Not all schools, and yes, it's a industry wide problem. Such a shame.

http://www.hrd.qut.edu.au/healthsafe.../highGloss.jsp

Much ado about nothing. It's rarely more than a slight turn of the screen to fix.

Quote:
True, but a lot of computer users tend to be young, with good eyes and ignorant minds.

Putting down the people who don't agree with you is NOT a winning strategy. I just turned 60, and this has been my profession for many years. Do I fit into that niche you're trying to make up?

Quote:
Look at the iPod volume control issue right? Later on people will find out, also there are a lot of wealthy post baby boomer retiring, who need something to do rather than being carted to the local indian casinos.

I dont understand the twist to that paragraph.

Quote:
A computer could help a lot of them remain active, but their eyes need the extra softness and less strain.

It's just a minor matter of positioning.

Quote:
And to note, I do like the glossy displays, the image is cleaner and clearer, however if Apple could get rid of the glare and reflections (using special glass that's <1% surface reflective) perhaps it could make a glossy screen even better.


There's no such thing as glossy glass that's 1% reflective that's affordable. The only glass like that that I know would cost half the price of the computer. Apple's glossy screens do have a surface anti reflection coat. but they only do so much.
post #63 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

I actually own an ebook reader with an e-ink display and I can categorically state that e-ink is better than LCD for reading.

No, you can't. All you can say is that you think it is from your own experience, comparing it to a computer screen, or possibly some phone, whose properties you're not stating. Mine is different. And most people who are saying it have never read a book on a portable LCD screened device made for the purpose. Have you, and if so, which one?
post #64 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by sip View Post

To match the features and functions of the iPad, Amazon is going to have to go with what already exists, Windows7, Windows7Mobile or Android because there is no way Amazon is going to commit many millions to R&D, its own processors and OS no matter how big the ebook market is or will likely become.

With $3.4 B in the bank they can afford to make an Android Tablet or simply rebadge one. like the Asus one.

More than likely it'll be another epic fail though. They had a 2 year window and completely failed to lock in the ebook market through heavy handed bullying of publishers and high kindle costs. It would have been far better for them to subsidize the Kindles to $99 and left ebook prices at $14.99 for new releases.
post #65 of 157
amazon is in a pickle
they don't have an OS to compete, words no problem, rich media, big problem
so lets say they get some company to make a "pad" for them how are they going to
include all the guts, get chrome????
they won't control the os and can't control the user experience


i think there will be a textbook subscription service "rent text books" take out the middle man and more profits to author and epublisher
i hate carrying stinking books, now they can be with video, pictures and for a new edition won't be 2 years old and bibliographies come alive and instantly available WOW
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post #66 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

You may bee 100% correct, but obviously Amazon doesn't agree, because they 'blinked.' Sounds like they are either completely or at the very least partially planning to abandon their current Kindle tech and upgrade to compete with the iPad. Now Google is talking of putting out a tablet to compete with Apple. Fascinating how Apple forces others to follow their lead and bend to their technology in part out of fear of losing market share or not looking 'cool', not vice versa.

I agree; I think you did a good job summarizing the main implication of the article. Apple is confident and its competitors are insecure; Apple leads and they follow.

Do any of you think Amazon stands a realistic chance of putting out a half-way decent, competing product? Multi-touch, multi-function, presumably some kind of general purpose OS under the hood? I for one think they're in way over their head and their copycat product will very likely never see the light of day.
post #67 of 157
I think what Amazon needs to do is drop Kindle's price raise eBooks price to subsidize the Kindle, write a really great iPad/Android/Windows Mobile ebook app.

The only way I can understand why they are using the Kindle price to subsidize eBook is because people who bought kindle doesn't buy all that many books at all.
post #68 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihxo View Post

I think what Amazon needs to do is drop Kindle's price raise eBooks price to subsidize the Kindle, write a really great iPad/Android/Windows Mobile ebook app.

The only way I can understand why they are using the Kindle price to subsidize eBook is because people who bought kindle doesn't buy all that many books at all.

That's true. At least 80% of the books Amazon "sells" are free. Most of the rest, they're losing money on.

Great way to build a business!
post #69 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's true. At least 80% of the books Amazon "sells" are free. Most of the rest, they're losing money on.

Great way to build a business!

It is unless you screw it up. Then it's just pissing money away. Amazon screwed it up. Ooops.

It's one thing to make a throw of the dice, but it's quite another to poison the well while throwing the dice. A little metaphor mixing there but from what I see the publishers are none too pleased with Amazon.
post #70 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I agree on most of this, though people in financial trouble shouldn't be trying to justify an iPad until their troubles pass. But that still leaves quite a lot of people that may be able to try something new.

If it's done well, I think iPad may be a boon to subscriptions. A lot of magazines are so inexpensive that the subscriber's payment roughly covers the cost of mailing, and then there isn't the publishing expense. Maybe there can be an option for free with ads, or pay a certain amount for the version with no ads.

I agree that the iPad if done right can give a boost to subscriptions. The cost for delivering content electronically is minuscule compared to print.

I believe that there is a nice opportunity to make money with targeted ads in some subcription content such as magazines. That's why Apple has decided to enter the mobile ad business with their purchase of Quattro.
post #71 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

I actually own an ebook reader with an e-ink display and I can categorically state that e-ink is better than LCD for reading.

My backlit H-IPS is a joy to read after it's correctly calibrated.

Nothing beats Print.
post #72 of 157
The Kindle is a device in conflict; and the root of that conflict is the screen. It is both the best feature and the worst feature of the Kindle.

The E-ink display has ultra-low power consumption and causes no eye strain, making it perfect for reading books, but its lack of color and low refresh rate make it useless for other functions. Uninformed consumers also refuse to buy the Kindle based on its grayscale display, without knowing the benefits of E-ink.

If Amazon wants to expand the Kindle's functionality to compete with the iPad (or not even to compete, just to reach other markets), they'll have to switch to a normal LCD (or OLED). But that breaks the device as a dedicated book reader.
post #73 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The Kindle hasn't been hurt at all in fact durning the Holiday season it did very well. The only thing I would say is wrong is for someone to think the iPad is going to make a better ereader then the Kindle. Sorry but an LCD/LED screen is about the worst option for ereading. Good luck for anyone sitting outside trying to read with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Some members on this forum keep saying that but it couldn't be further from the truth. Many consumers want a device that has a single purpose and performs that purpose well. The Kindle is a far better ereader simply based on is screen technology compared to the iPad. For ereading using a EPD display is far better then an LCD/LED.

There wouldnt be any reason for consumers to sell their Kindle even if they were going to by an iPad.

I see he is at it again providing his opinions without any fact. Reason I say fact is because Amazon have never published actual sales figures for Kindle and you know the product did quite well in holiday season.

The comment about many consumers want a device that has a single purpose and performs that purpose well, show me the consumer survey data or stop providing BS to this discussion.
post #74 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihxo View Post

You won't be benefiting from eInk much if you use it for GPS.

Ya... main thing for me is screen visibility. A highly reflective color screen (eInk or otherwise) would great for outdoors.
post #75 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Uninformed consumers also refuse to buy the Kindle based on its grayscale display, without knowing the benefits of E-ink.

Meh, I think the "benefits" of E-ink are severely overblown. I've borrowed a kindle from a friend soon after they first came out to see if it was a device I would be interested in owning. I found the lack of a backlight more of a PITA than a benefit. In the situations where and when I commute there often isn't enough ambient light and I was straining more to see the kindle screen. I didn't think the contrast of the display was dramatically superior than LCD, and I think Apple nailed the whole battery life thing. Much like criticism of the iPhone, I don't see a big deal of plugging in a phone at night to charge - mainly because I don't plug it in, but set it into a dock instead of just laying it down on a table. Same will apply to the iPad.

E-ink is interesting, but in the end the "problems" it solves are pretty much irrelevant in the grand scheme of things. It's not compelling enough to justify on it's own, and the kindle is going to get steamrolled by the iPad. Not just because of the screen (being a one trick pony because of the screen doesn't help the kindle).
post #76 of 157
I can't believe Amazon is going with a plan to recruit new hires and rework everything from scratch.

That's a serious oversupply of stupidity. They don't have a chance.

As I have said before, all they need to do is call Palm ASAP. Rubenstein will take the call.
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #77 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

As I have said before, all they need to do is call Palm ASAP. Rubenstein will take the call.

Heh...you think? I think Rubenstein would sing show tunes while dancing naked in Times Square to get that call.

Fortunately I don't recall what Rubenstein looks like so I have no disturbing imagery to try to forget now.
post #78 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No, you can't. All you can say is that you think it is from your own experience, comparing it to a computer screen, or possibly some phone, whose properties you're not stating. Mine is different. And most people who are saying it have never read a book on a portable LCD screened device made for the purpose. Have you, and if so, which one?

I have used computer monitors, laptops, phones, and PDAs all with LCD displays and having also used e-ink I am saying their is absolutely no doubt in my mind that e-ink is superior for reading.

Have you ever used an e-ink device and I mean properly used one such as reading a full book, not merely trying one out for a short period of time?
post #79 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceMcLean View Post

Other job postings support Amazon's recently unveiled Software Development Kit plans for Kindle, intended to create accessory applications for the product. Any apps will almost certainly require existing Kindle users to upgrade to new hardware, as the technical constraints of e-ink would greatly limit what kinds of useful apps developers could create.

This is looking through Apple coloured glasses.

Sure, lots of games can't work with e-ink. But many things can. Taking a look through my first few pages of iPhone apps gives an idea of things that might be useful
1) Calendar
2) weather report
3) Train timetable
4) Messages, Skype
5) Chess with Friends (and other similar "still graphics" games like checkers, backgammon, solitaire, sudoku)
6) TV Guide
7) Quota checker (for phone, internet usage)
8) Surf report
9) Around me
10) Now Playing movie guide
11) News One
12) Allrecipes
13) Baby Namer
13) Wikipedia
14) Zenbe lists
etc.

Sure there's a LOT it can't do, but these kind of apps could be of significant benefit to kindle users
post #80 of 157
Amazon don't have the expertise or experience to make it in to a fully fledged tablet computer. They should leave it as a dedicated reader and make it impossibly thin and light and better than the iPad for ebooks in every way or else quit while they're ahead and go back to just selling digital downloads for other platforms.
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