or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › iTunes price increases mean slower sales for music labels
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

iTunes price increases mean slower sales for music labels

post #1 of 140
Thread Starter 
Since Apple granted music labels the flexibility to set individual song prices between $0.69 and $1.29 on the iTunes Music Store, growth of digital music sales has slowed, one music executive revealed Tuesday.

According to Peter Kafka at MediaMemo, Warner Music Group revealed Tuesday that it has seen digital music sales slow down since the price increase took effect in April 2009. Digital album downloads grew 5 percent in December, down from 10 percent in the September quarter and 11 percent in the June quarter. Digital revenue is slowing as well: Warner saw 8 percent growth in the holiday quarter, versus 20 percent a year before.

Warner CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. reportedly said the pricing change has been a "net positive" for Warner, but conceded that a 30 percent price increase during a recession was not the best move.

The executive went on to comment during Tuesday's quarterly earnings conference call on the effect Apple and its iPad announcement has had on the publishing industry. Specifically, Apple has offered publishers some flexibility in pricing their e-books, as opposed to the more strict approach the company has taken with music.

"During the earnings call, Bronfman sounded a bit wistful as he noted the book industry’s apparent success, with the help of Apple, at raising prices above the $9.99 floor Amazon (AMZN) had set," Kafka wrote.

Bronfman reportedly said, "It’s interesting that the book publishing industry, on the iPad, has much more flexibility than the music industry had."

Last August, Apple's iTunes was found to be a quarter of all music sales in the U.S. That makes iTunes by far the largest music retailer, ahead of second-place Walmart with 14 percent. In all, digital downloads make up 35 percent of music sales, and iTunes accounts for 69 percent of online sales. But despite iTunes' popularity, CDs still remain the top-selling format, with 65 percent of overall sales.

In early 2009, Apple convinced record labels to remove digital rights management from iTunes music downloads. But in the process, the Cupertino, Calif., company conceded price flexibility. Starting last April, some popular tracks saw a 30 percent increase in price, from 99 cents to $1.29.

But as Apple looks to take on Amazon's Kindle in the e-book business, the company has offered publishers the ability to price new hardcover titles higher -- from $12.99 to $14.99 -- than Amazon's $9.99 price. Apple's deal influenced publisher Macmillan to push Amazon to allow it to adjust its prices, to which the bookseller reluctantly agreed. Higher prices on the Amazon Kindle are expected to coincide with the launch of Apple's multimedia iPad in late March.

It is Apple's entrance into the e-book market, with its new iBooks application and accompanying iBookstore, that has caused a new rift between publishers and Amazon. Following Macmillan's lead, Hachette Book Group and HarperCollins have both announced their intent to ink new deals with more flexible price structuring with Amazon.

Publishers have said the increased prices will not lead to greater profits, but will protect the viability of the book marketplace by giving authors and agents the ability to make more money on every digital sale. Some have said they believe the current Amazon $9.99 pricing model hurts retailers who sell the hardcover editions by devaluing books.
post #2 of 140


I mean really, having established the overall value of their music previously at the .99USD-1.29USD price point and then the recording companies begging Apple to be allowed to raise the prices - consumers didn't LEAP at the opportunity to be gouged again??

Stupid, stupid consumers. When will we learn? The demand in the market doesn't drive pricing, the need for yet another house on the French Riviera for a music executive does. As the aging elephant that is the current profit model for the music/entertainment industry does it's death dance we just have to make sure we are a safe distance from it as it thrashes around.
post #3 of 140
So Apple devalued music and Amazon devalued books. Will this mean slower sales for ebooks as well ? Has Apple dug iPad's grave before its launch?
post #4 of 140
The music industry is going to put itself out of business.

It raised prices and has seen a flattening of growth. And still wishes for more price flexibility.

Apple is doing to Amazon something no one has been able to do to Apple - introduce a compelling product and sales platform pair.

iPod and iTunes
iPhone and App Store
iPad and iBook

the iPod superiority as a device insured the success of iTunes
The iPhone + App Store will dominate the smart phone industry
The iPad+iBook/App Store/iTunes trifecta will be interesting to watch. I can see it going both ways (going main stream, or being relegated to niche status).

iPod put YOUR music in your pocket.
iPhone puts the wealth of the internet in your pocket.
iPad... A boon for train commuters, casual browsers and book readers. Not what I call a robust market segment.

But I am going to buy one anyway.
post #5 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to Peter Kafka at MediaMemo, Warner Music Group revealed Tuesday that it has seen digital music sales sales slow down since the price increase took effect in April 2009.

"In other shocking news today, it was revealed that dropped objects fall to earth and water is wet."

I'm sure at least ONE person working for the record companies took freshman economics? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?
post #6 of 140
And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29....
post #7 of 140
The music companies have gotten exactly what they wanted. Unit sales are down so they pay the artists less money. The higher per unit prices mean total revenues stay the same or increase. The best of both worlds for them, but just the opposite for the artists and consumers.
post #8 of 140
Boy, these executives are REALLY dumb. They're so dumb that they just love to kill their own business. They should have kept the 99 cent price and sell more songs but instead, they want to be greedy and push people to steal their music instead. Good job!

Bronfman's an idiot for saying that the publishers are better off getting a higher price. What that will do is force people again to steal their books rather than buy it. Who do you think loses in the end? Not the consumers. Publishers should have kept the $9.99 policy that Amazon wanted. After all, they know what the consumers want since they have the data which supports higher demand below the $10 price point.
post #9 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Bronfman reportedly said, "Its interesting that the book publishing industry, on the iPad, has much more flexibility than the music industry had."

Music and books are quite different businesses. Music is a commodity, with zillions of units being traded. It also had a huge piracy problem. By comparison books are a niche market now, with units being sold to few readers (compared to music listeners). There was also very little piracy in the book market compared to music. Music vendors can easily make up in volume what they lose in unit price. Book sellers don't have as much margin to do that.

eBooks are the future of publishing, but they will never sell in the quantities that songs do. So Bronfman is either being disingenuous or is just dense.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #10 of 140
More utter nonsense from the backwards music industry. Especially with the book comparison. Well, dummy, $9.99 is artificially low for a book considering new hardback typically sell for $18-30. Even on a big sale, they usually only dip to about $13.99 or so. CDs on the other hand top out at $16 generally and can normally be found for $12 regular price and as low as $7 on sale.

Plus, books are different animal. No one's clamoring to buy one chapter of a book at a time because the rest of the book sucks.

Complete neanderthals are in charge of music labels these days.
post #11 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

So Apple devalued music and Amazon devalued books. Will this mean slower sales for ebooks as well ? Has Apple dug iPad's grave before its launch?


NOPE.
The iPad will still be a HUGE SUCCESS
iBooks is just a feature. A single App, if you will.

Wait till you start seeing all the sophisticated, powerful, yet easy & intuitive-to-use iPad Apps.

The iPad will be a HUGE SUCCESS because of the endless possibility of the Apps.

No need to refute. Time will tell all.
post #12 of 140
As they say record execs, be careful what you wish for.
post #13 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"During the earnings call, Bronfman sounded a bit wistful as he noted the book industrys apparent success, with the help of Apple, at raising prices above the $9.99 floor Amazon (AMZN) had set," Kafka wrote.

Bronfman reportedly said, "Its interesting that the book publishing industry, on the iPad, has much more flexibility than the music industry had."

Sure Edgar, the music industry and publishing industry are identical. Rotten Apple. If only you had been in charge, you'd still be on top of the world.
post #14 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Publishers have said the increased prices will not lead to greater profits, but will protect the viability of the book marketplace by giving authors and agents the ability to make more money on every digital sale. Some have said they believe the current Amazon $9.99 pricing model hurts retailers who sell the hardcover editions by devaluing books.

No matter how many times they repeat this statement, I can never understand. If anyone does, could you please enlighten me? How is it possible that the model will help them make more money "on every digital sale" but not lead to greater profits?

More money per sale = more profits. If not, that means the higher prices hurt demand, and if that's the case, then it is just a dumb move and they would not do it, as no one would gain from it.
Help kill Adobe's Flash. Complain to websites using it. Join YouTube's HTML5 beta (http://www.youtube.com/html5)
Reply
Help kill Adobe's Flash. Complain to websites using it. Join YouTube's HTML5 beta (http://www.youtube.com/html5)
Reply
post #15 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston View Post

And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29....

ditto. I haven't seen one at all, nevermind seeing one worth wanting.
post #16 of 140
Quote:
Since Apple granted music labels the flexibility to set individual song prices between $0.69 and $1.29 on the iTunes Music Store, growth of digital music sales has slowed, one music executive revealed Tuesday.


Yep, stupid move there.

Price is a signal, it can tell people which song is worth buying and which isn't.

Now faced with higher prices for select songs, people began to conserve and not buy the 99¢ songs as much, this lead to a overall decrease in sales.

It would have been better to keep the songs all at 99¢, this way let people judge which is good, they will buy more this way than being told by a higher price what is good and what not is good.


The "Great Recession" isn't really to blame for decreased digital music sales, people are buying more computers than ever before to kill idle time at home to save money, self entertain themselves, including buying music. It's the poor decision to allow variable prices, but the music industry thought Apple was getting too powerful and wanted to put the brakes on.


Stupid, stupid, stupid. But then that's the music industry for you.
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
post #17 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

So Apple devalued music and Amazon devalued books. Will this mean slower sales for ebooks as well ? Has Apple dug iPad's grave before its launch?

I'm not sure 'devalued' is the right term. I would say re-valued, as napster and other song sharing schemes had reduced the value of a song to functionally nothing.

The 0.99 USD price point was small enough to entice people back from file sharing sites, and allowed them to consume the media the way they wanted, why spend $20 for a CD when all you want is one song?

iTunes cut the knees out from under the CD market, the price of a CD in the late 90s was significantly higher than it is now.

Black markets form when demand price or volume do not intersect supply price or volume. And file sharing is nothing more than a black market.

The music industry's arrogance led to it's fall, not the internet.

As for books, it's a different model completely. And one that is only marginally relevant. My wife and I have thousands of books. And several hundred electronic books. We don't own a kindle or other eBook device. We read them on our phones (iPhone(me), Palm Centro (wife).

I think that Amazons price was bound to fail, especially when they tied thier price to exclusivity. Why should a publisher cut a better deal with an electronic vender, undercutting it's own physical sales? The Kindle and all book readers are nice, but they will not change how literature is consumed (ala iTunes vs. the CD).

No, in the future, Amazon will sell eBooks that are iBook compatible, because they don't have a compelling device.
post #18 of 140
They could lower the price of music via digital download and make even more money but that would further erode the sale of physical media. The record industry isn't ready for that. Or, individuals who have worked their way up the corporate ladder thinking one way, are simply too obtuse to pursue an entirely different approach. Some folks who have enjoyed financial success stop thinking because they don't begin to question their approach being as it's that approach which they perceive has brought them the wealth they enjoy.

Even when the path to success is clearly mapped out, there is a refusal to embrace it. The human mind, especially operating within a corporate framework, is a curious beast.
post #19 of 140
You can't really compare books and music.

Books, really can't be consumed through other means. Sure, you can go to the library or borrow the book. Maybe buy it used after several weeks to months after the initial release. But most people who buy books - buy books. Many keep them to be enjoyed again.

Music, on the other hand can be consumed on the radio for free. Satellite radio for a fee. It may be torrented or downloaded by other means, eschewing the exchange of money for a product. Further... the general lack of quality music these days in pop music -- means that music is disposable and not "timeless."

Pricing is psychological. I don't think I have ever come across a 69-cent song on iTunes. Most these days are $1.29. I know I buy less. It is easy, mentally at least, to click "BUY," when I am buying a 99-cent song. 30-cents more... I think about it.
post #20 of 140
Well this deserves a big fat, duh!
post #21 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... Publishers have said the increased prices will not lead to greater profits, but will protect the viability of the book marketplace by giving authors and agents the ability to make more money on every digital sale. Some have said they believe the current Amazon $9.99 pricing model hurts retailers who sell the hardcover editions by devaluing books.

This is absolute BS.

These "publishers" give the author a few pennies on each book even though the production costs are ridiculously low. Even a fifty percent increase in the selling price would just up each of the parties profits by the same amount. So instead of making a dollar on a $9.99 eBook the authors will make $1.50 and the publishers (who contribute very little to the value of the product at all), will still make the lions share of the profit.
post #22 of 140
Traditional manufacturers and publishers just don't get the Internet and they don't understand who their customers really are. They think their customers are those traditional brick and mortar retail store owners. These are folks who constantly complain that the Internet is ruining their businesses with ruinous discounting. They put pressure on manufacturer's and publishers to get prices up so that there will be an, ahem, 'level playing field.'

That's nonsense of course. The real customers are the ultimate consumers who are proving that price is an important variable. Both the music companies and the book publishers would be trying to lower prices, rather than raise prices, if they had a clue.
post #23 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston View Post

And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29.

Very fair point. Variable pricing really means a lot of stuff now costs $1.29.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #24 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by reliason View Post

...I think that Amazons price was bound to fail, especially when they tied thier price to exclusivity. Why should a publisher cut a better deal with an electronic vender, undercutting it's own physical sales? The Kindle and all book readers are nice, but they will not change how literature is consumed (ala iTunes vs. the CD).


Amazon wanted to sour the adoption of the Kindle, the best way to achieve this was by lower e-book prices than the paper book. Just like the 99¢ per song did for the iPod.

Hopefully what will spur adoption of the iPad is the ability to rent books, with the option to buy, opening up a whole new market which the Kindle can't compete just yet.


Quote:
No, in the future, Amazon will sell eBooks that are iBook compatible, because they don't have a compelling device.

I don't think so, Apple won't allow their DRM to work with other hardware makers like the Kindle, I can almost bet on it. The DRM will be tied to the A4 processor somehow, and since the Kindle can't get access to the A4...
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
post #25 of 140
"During the earnings call, Bronfman sounded a bit wistful as he noted the book industry’s apparent success, with the help of Apple, at raising prices above the $9.99 floor Amazon (AMZN) had set," Kafka wrote.

Bronfman reportedly said, "It’s interesting that the book publishing industry, on the iPad, has much more flexibility than the music industry had."

Ironic statement, given that the music industry used DRM free downloads on Amazon as a tool to get Apple to raise iTunes prices.
post #26 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

This is absolute BS.

These "publishers" give the author a few pennies on each book even though the production costs are ridiculously low. Even a fifty percent increase in the selling price would just up each of the parties profits by the same amount. So instead of making a dollar on a $9.99 eBook the authors will make $1.50 and the publishers (who contribute very little to the value of the product at all), will still make the lions share of the profit.

Maybe Apple are betting some writers might end up self publishing through iTunes? And even though it looks like they are helping the publishers right now things could change in the future?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #27 of 140
if you want to support the record companies ---> buy the music

if you want to support the artist --------------> go to the concerts (and buy t-shirts too)
[center] "Hey look, it's in the center. I am SO cool!"[/center]
Reply
[center] "Hey look, it's in the center. I am SO cool!"[/center]
Reply
post #28 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by swtchdtomak View Post

"During the earnings call, Bronfman sounded a bit wistful as he noted the book industrys apparent success, with the help of Apple, at raising prices above the $9.99 floor Amazon (AMZN) had set," Kafka wrote.

Bronfman reportedly said, "Its interesting that the book publishing industry, on the iPad, has much more flexibility than the music industry had."

Ironic statement, given that the music industry used DRM free downloads on Amazon as a tool to get Apple to raise iTunes prices.

He's talking pricing. From the start iTunes was .99c - that's all he's stabbing at. Don't get me wrong, I think pricing digital books like this is stupid in many ways.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #29 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston View Post

And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29....

There are some, but they're just token tracks. Sadly, it was just a ploy try getting the public on the industry's side and not Apple's.

I don't have a problem with $1.29 if I wanted the song, if it's worth buying then it's probably going to get far better play value than most other media, but it really plays poorly with pricing psychology.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stompy View Post

Sure Edgar, the music industry and publishing industry are identical. Rotten Apple. If only you had been in charge, you'd still be on top of the world.

The music industry is far more price-rigid than publishing and the movie industry. It's easy to find $6 new DVDs of decent back catalog movies, but almost impossible time finding a music CD in that range at retail, unless it's one of those low-rent compilation CDs, and not original albums.

Quote:
Originally Posted by m2002brian View Post

if you want to support the record companies ---> buy the music

if you want to support the artist --------------> go to the concerts (and buy t-shirts too)

That's a different ball game. The venue takes a pretty big cut of the ticket price.
post #30 of 140
I like iTunes for buying single songs. If I like most of the songs on an album, I buy the CD and then copy it to my iPod. CD's are like books, after its been out for a while, you can get a great buy or you might be able to find a used copy at an store like Amoeba. I don't buy an album for only one song--I look for another source to get a copy. If I want a book, I wait until the price drops--I like hard cover if I intend to keep it for long time. I can see a place for eBooks and it will suit a certain group fine. So it is not surprising if you raise the price, not all of the people will pay.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #31 of 140
The good news is that I found a whole trove of songs in the iTunes Store that are 69 cents.

The bad news is they are all by Sasquatch.
post #32 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

This is absolute BS.

These "publishers" give the author a few pennies on each book even though the production costs are ridiculously low. Even a fifty percent increase in the selling price would just up each of the parties profits by the same amount. So instead of making a dollar on a $9.99 eBook the authors will make $1.50 and the publishers (who contribute very little to the value of the product at all), will still make the lions share of the profit.

Publishers will make less money using the 70/30 Apple iBooks way that the $9.99 Amazon way. Publishers are already selling their books to Amazon at $14.99. Amazon is losing $5 for each $9.99 book they sell on the Kindle.
The publisher goal is not to achieve a short term immediate profit. They want more control over pricing, which can help in the long term. It is not about printing and production cost as well. Most university textbooks cost $100+ and they go through the same production process as a $40 book. One of my professors wrote two books in construction management, which are taught worldwide. He told me he will never write another book again because of how little he gets for it.
post #33 of 140
How is Warner arguing that the change was a net positive when their growth in revenue slowed? I thought they were in the business of making money, yet they are happy when their statement implies that they could have made more money under the old price model?
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
post #34 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

I don't think so, Apple won't allow their DRM to work with other hardware makers like the Kindle, I can almost bet on it. The DRM will be tied to the A4 processor somehow, and since the Kindle can't get access to the A4...

I think I mistyped. What I meant is... that Amazon will make money selling eBooks for the iPad, either through a 'kindle' app on iPad or as DRM free, ePub format files that (hopefully) Apple allows to be read in iBook. Similar to ripping your own CDs to your music library.

The Kindle, as a product, is most likely headed toward Microsoft Zune status. It will linger, but never be very relavant.
post #35 of 140
The economy has been in the tank for over a year and people are increasingly realizing they don't have discretionary money to throw around. Apple's charging an extra twenty-five cents is basically immaterial. Are any OTHER discretionary categories of spending growing? I don't think so.
post #36 of 140
This is the single reason why i went down the Napster/Spotify route.

I've kind of got used to the idea of rental as opposed to ownership, although i still indulge every now and then.

Still love ya Apple but your just to expensive for me these days.
A reputation is not built upon the restful domain of one's comfort zone; it is made out of stalwart exposition of your core beliefs, for all challenges to disprove them as irrelevant hubris.- Berp...
Reply
A reputation is not built upon the restful domain of one's comfort zone; it is made out of stalwart exposition of your core beliefs, for all challenges to disprove them as irrelevant hubris.- Berp...
Reply
post #37 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston View Post

And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29....

I've seen one. However, it was an alternate version of a very old, minor pop hit from decades ago, recorded by the same artist, but obviously an early recording that wasn't as polished. I didn't bite.
post #38 of 140
Full scale internet riot going on at MacDailyNews...

http://macdailynews.com/index.php/we...omments/23972/
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
post #39 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston View Post

And I've yet to see ANY song at 69 cents. Even stuff from the 70's or 60's is full price. And god forbid some 70's song was just in a movie - price magically jumps to 1.29....

Either you are too lazy to look or too stupid to read. The following are just a few albums with song prices ranging from a high of 0.67 to a low of 0.05 (canadian iTunes store - the us store will probably be cheaper)

Under the table and Dreaming - Dave Matthews Band - $7.99 - 12 @ $0.67
The Best of Simon & Garfunkel - Simon & Garfunkel - $9.99 - 20 @ $0.50
The Carpenters Greatests Hits - \tThe Carpenters - $5.99 - 16 @ $0.37\t
The Complete Billie Holiday - \tBillie Holiday - $9.99 - 35 @ $0.29
Elvis 75 - Elvis Presley - \t$7.99 - 25@$0.32\t\t
Emmylou Harris Anthology: The Warner / Reprise Years - $9.99 - \t44@\t$0.23\t
In My Lifetime - \tNeil Diamond - \t$24.99 -\t71@\t$0.35\t
The Most Essential Classical Music In Movies - \tVarious Artists - \t$5.99 - \t49@\t$0.12\t
Respect - The Very Best of Aretha Franklin - \tAretha Franklin - $9.99 - 43@\t$0.23\t
50s Rock N' Roll Valentines - \tVarious Artists - \t$19.99 - \t129@$0.15
Ultimate Alabama 20 # 1 Hits - \tAlabama - $9.99 -20@$0.50\t\t
Essential Jazz Masters - \tVarious Artists - $9.99 - 186@\t$0.05\t

The last one (Jazz Masters is downloading as we speak .. I found it while researching for this post ... you could look up "researching, it's in the dictionary)\t.... contains artists like Duke Ellington, Miles Davis etc.\t\t

Your posts would be more meaningful if you would "learn" before you speak.
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
post #40 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

Either you are too lazy to look or too stupid to read. The following are just a few albums with song prices ranging from a high of 0.67 to a low of 0.05 (canadian iTunes store - the us store will probably be cheaper)
[...]
The last one (Jazz Masters is downloading as we speak .. I found it while researching for this post ... you could look up "researching, it's in the dictionary)\t.... contains artists like Duke Ellington, Miles Davis etc.\t\t

Your posts would be more meaningful if you would "learn" before you speak.

Your examples are albums, not individual songs as the article states. I randomly checked 3 of the albums you posted and none offer the 69¢ pricing. Some songs even had the $1.29 pricing.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › iTunes price increases mean slower sales for music labels