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AT&T partners with Alcatel, Ericsson for 2011 LTE deployment

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
AT&T announced Wednesday that it will begin to roll out its "4G" high-speed, next-generation mobile broadband network with Alcatel-Lucent and Ericsson in preparation for a 2011 commercial deployment.

AT&T's Long Term Evolution network will deliver higher broadband throughput and lower latency than the company's existing 3G network. Trials for the new network are expected to start later this year, and new 3G equipment provided by the companies will be easily convertible to LTE. This will allow AT&T to upgrade existing equipment and software, rather than install new equipment to transition to LTE.

"The selection of Alcatel-Lucent and Ericsson is an important step forward in our ongoing mobile broadband strategy, which is focused on delivering the best possible combination of speed, performance and available devices for customers at every level of technology deployment," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "AT&T has a key advantage in that LTE is an evolution of the existing GSM family of technologies that powers our network and the vast majority of the world's global wireless infrastructure today."

Competitor Verizon also has plans to adopt LTE in the future. The transition is expected to cost U.S. carriers an estimated $1.78 billion each in the first year alone. Verizon, too, has entered into partnerships with Alcatel-Lucent and Ericsson for its own LTE network.

The agreement with AT&T designates Alcatel-Lucent and Ericsson as the domain suppliers for its Radio Access Network Domain. The multi-year agreement covers radio access equipment that will be deployed at multiple sites across AT&T's network in preparation for the LTE expansion.

Preparation in 2010 for LTE, along with improvements to AT&T's 3G network, will be a part of between $18 billion and $19 billion in capital expenditures for the company this year.

Last year, AT&T deployed high-speed 3G High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology to a number of cities across the U.S. By the end of 2011, the theoretical 7.2Mbps download speeds are expected to be available to 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.

Currently, the iPhone is only available on GSM networks. While SIM card-based phones are the standard internationally, carriers such as Verizon and Sprint in the U.S. use CDMA-based networks.

But Verizon's adoption of LTE could change that. Unlike the artificial split between North America and the rest of the world today, a large number of both domestic and international carriers plan to move to LTE within the next few years, including AT&T and T-Mobile USA.

If LTE catches on, the switch could let Apple build iPhones that stay with one core technology but which could be used worldwide with no real compromise. But with wide LTE deployment not planned until 2011, it is unlikely a LTE-capable iPhone would arrive before then.
post #2 of 22
Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...
post #3 of 22
Still waiting for the $29 a month unlimited voice and data plan that makes buying a $600 iPhone worth it.

Until then, my MacBook Pro and cheap voice phone is doing the job for me.


By the way

Google has announced it's rolling out FREE fiber optic broadband in select cities, 100x faster than anything available.

http://www.google.com/tisp/install.html


Free VOIP for everyone, no need a expensive cell contract...


The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...

Why in the world would you want push to talk, when you can get unlimited talk with unlimited internet on the iPhone for $99.00 a month.
post #5 of 22
http://www.networkworld.com/news/201...g-rollout.html

Excerpt:

Quote:
In addition to switching its 3G network to HSPA 7.2, AT&T is also hoping to boost network capacity by utilizing more spectrum on the 850MHz band. The company is hoping that deploying its 3G network over the 850MHz spectrum will solve some of the big capacity and propagation problems it has encountered in major markets such as New York and San Francisco.

Rival carrier Verizon is expected to be the first U.S. carrier to commercially deploy LTE, as it plans to launch 4G services in about 30 major markets in the United States throughout 2010. Verizon late last year started trialing LTE in both Boston and Seattle, and in its initial trials with partner Vodafone, Verizon has achieved peak speeds of 60Mbps on its LTE network.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...

Push To Talk: Ha! that's really awesome. (If you're living permanently in 1996)
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Push To Talk: Ha! that's really awesome. (If you're living permanently in 1996)

Yeah, that brings up images of firemen or steel workers, who incidentally all wear heavy gloves so that isn't going to work on an iPhone.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Still waiting for the $29 a month unlimited voice and data plan that makes buying a $600 iPhone worth it.

Until then, my MacBook Pro and cheap voice phone is doing the job for me.


By the way

Google has announced it's rolling out FREE fiber optic broadband in select cities, 100x faster than anything available.

http://www.google.com/tisp/install.html


Free VOIP for everyone, no need a expensive cell contract...



You joke, but funny how life imitates art

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/...erimental.html
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
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iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
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post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...

i used to have a blackberry on Nextel with PTT. it was the most annoying phone i've ever used
post #10 of 22
Oh no, not another rollout of a new technology that starts from zero again in terms of coverage.

Can we just have saturated, max-speed 3G instead?

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...

Breaker-Breaker-One-Nine - Rubber Ducky, are you out there?

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

Oh no, not another rollout of a new technology that starts from zero again in terms of coverage.

Can we just have saturated, max-speed 3G instead?

Yeah. I'm worried about the change-over too.
Quote:
This will allow AT&T to upgrade existing equipment and software, rather than install new equipment to transition to LTE.

Does this mean that they will upgrade the existing 3G equipment on a tower to switch it over to 4G?
Would that mean that 3G coverage would drop significantly as they modify the equipment?

Or am I reading this too simplistically?
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
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Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
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post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Still waiting for the $29 a month unlimited voice and data plan that makes buying a $600 iPhone worth it.

Until then, my MacBook Pro and cheap voice phone is doing the job for me.


By the way

Google has announced it's rolling out FREE fiber optic broadband in select cities, 100x faster than anything available.

http://www.google.com/tisp/install.html


Free VOIP for everyone, no need a expensive cell contract...



When you can slip that Macbook Pro in your pocket and take it anywhere you go, let us know.
post #14 of 22
is Apple and ATT missing a big opportunity here. ATT should borrow about 10 billion from Apple's cash coffers and use it to roll out the ultimate network in the shortest amount of time. With the best phone, tablet, software and delivery system, coupled with an awesome (ATT) network, it would be world domination (well, at least in the USA.) It would make the Microsoft Windows and Office monopoly pale in comparison. (an saying ATT and awesome in the same sentence just doesn't sound right!)
post #15 of 22
AI writes "..If LTE catches on..."

What the hell is that supposed to mean? All the GSM carriers are going LTE and so is Verizon. Catches on? The only questions are the effective timetable for LTE rollout and when the corresponding handsets to make use of it will become available.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Still waiting for the $29 a month unlimited voice and data plan that makes buying a $600 iPhone worth it.

Until then, my MacBook Pro and cheap voice phone is doing the job for me.


By the way

Google has announced it's rolling out FREE fiber optic broadband in select cities, 100x faster than anything available.

http://www.google.com/tisp/install.html


Free VOIP for everyone, no need a expensive cell contract...



Wait... Apple released a smartphone called "MacBook Pro & Cheap Voice Phone" with a $29 unlimited data and voice plan?!!!
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Another reason I switched to the original iPhone from my Nextel/Sprint i90c, the TDMA network is mostly nonexistent overseas, making your phone a brick. STILL waiting for Nextel Style Direct Connect (Push To Talk) on AT&T iPhone...

A company I worked for used to love those nextel phones. We got a new cfo and he was having meetings with mangers and supervisors to discuss the problems we were having and what improvements we needed to make. He grew so disgusted with people interrupting the meetings with those things he banned them from meetings and by the end of the first week they were all replaced with non-push to talk phones. They may have their place but few people really need them. Although I do understand why people in the construction trades love them, that demographic probably is not best served with a iphone.
Crying? No, I am not crying. I am sweating through my eyes.
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Crying? No, I am not crying. I am sweating through my eyes.
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post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddyp View Post

A company I worked for used to love those nextel phones. We got a new cfo and he was having meetings with mangers and supervisors to discuss the problems we were having and what improvements we needed to make. He grew so disgusted with people interrupting the meetings with those things he banned them from meetings and by the end of the first week they were all replaced with non-push to talk phones. They may have their place but few people really need them. Although I do understand why people in the construction trades love them, that demographic probably is not best served with a iphone.

They are also a godsend to selfish louts who turn them up full-blast in restaurants and hotel lobbies so we all get to hear "beedleyBEEP" and then a loud metallic voice. Then the lout presses the PTT button and, holding the instrument 5 feet from his head, replies in a shout-voice. BeedleyBEEP!

Half the Nextel owners should stick their phones in an uncomfortable place.
A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
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A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
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post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

Yeah. I'm worried about the change-over too.

Does this mean that they will upgrade the existing 3G equipment on a tower to switch it over to 4G?
Would that mean that 3G coverage would drop significantly as they modify the equipment?

Or am I reading this too simplistically?

Way too simplistic, unfortunately.

They can't just upgrade the equipment. They'll add new equipment to handle the new frequencies (700Mhz band, in the US at least!) and also to handle the new modulation and protocols they need to support, as well as new hardware to handle 4G/3G handover. What this all means is that they will "launch" LTE in 2011 but the coverage will SUCK for probably a year, and then be GENERALLY BAD for 2 to 4 more years depending on where you live. Look at how long it took to get 3G out everywhere. That's what's going to happen again.

What this means is that even if you're living in an area that has LTE you'll still need a phone with EVDO/1xRTT/CDMA or HSPA/EDGE/GSM backup depending on whether you're using a Verizon or AT&T "LTE" phone. Eventually they'll drop the old network but it will take years. Also, imagine that Verizon want to launch a worldwide smartphone. It would have to be LTE/EVDO/1xRTT/CDMA/HSPA/EDGE/GSM. And keep in mind that even on LTE there are going to be many different frequency bands like how it is today.

So, LTE is going to make things faster but at the expense of making things a whole lot more complicated for a while. It's no panacea.

AT&T have the advantage during this transition because their 4G/3G products will be worldwide and cheaper, as today... Eventually AT&T and Verizon will be more level as they'll be able to release LTE-only products, and by then Sprint will probably be dead or wishing they hadn't picked WiMax.

In short, buy AT&T.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by notabull View Post

AT&T have the advantage during this transition because their 4G/3G products will be worldwide and cheaper, as today... Eventually AT&T and Verizon will be more level as they'll be able to release LTE-only products, and by then Sprint will probably be dead or wishing they hadn't picked WiMax.

In short, buy AT&T.

AT&T has always been having the advantage of cheaper gears because of GSM economies of scale --- it doesn't mean anything when AT&T doesn't spend the money on the network.

Verizon has always been stuck with higher priced network infrastructure gears because CDMA never had any great economies of scale --- it doesn't mean anything when Verizon has always been willing to spend the money on infrastructure build-outs.
post #21 of 22
AT&T is one of the leading telecommunication companies in the US. You can always count on them. There are some cases when you might be depressed with its services, but rest assured you would have to be more disappointed if you are with some other service providers. They are one of the oldest in this fields so they are more experienced even thought they upgrade their products slowly but they always provide quality service.
post #22 of 22
I'm skeptical a LTE only phone would work well on Verizon's network. It would be like if the iPhone had only 3G, no EDGE. By the time Verizon builds up its LTE to be self sufficient, 5G will be rolled out.
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