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Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Last night I went to see Blue Wild Angel:
Jimi Hendrix Live at the Isle of Wight
(Murray Lerner, USA, 2001, Video with surround sound, 102 mins)

Very revealing documentary. This was Jimi's last performance...18 days later, he was dead. He really only did the concert only to get more money to complete the Electric Ladyland Studios in New York City and finish recording his new album. In this unedited and restored version you can really see his frustration with his fame and its responsibilities. Once he came onstage the crowd (which was 600,000 muddy, sleepy and impatient on the third day) demanded "Purple Haze", Foxy Lady" and all his old tunes whereas Jimi wanted to play his more new works. Which he did with less than enthusiastic response.

He looked pretty frustrated (and coked-out) throughout the show. He had a lot of technical difficulties. At one point while jamming you can hear through his amplifiers the communications of the Isle of Wight crew. Then there were the usual amplification problems. So, Jimi just turned everything up to 11. Still, some moments were astounding ("Red House", Foxy Lady" and a 17 minute "Machine Gun" was amazing).

It's sad that he couldn't continue. The director was there to ask questions, and I asked what he might know as to what Jimi would have done if he had lived. He said that one project in mind was record an album with Miles Davis...one can only dream now...

If this film comes around to you all...see it. Should be out on video and DVD in the Summer.
I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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post #2 of 5
He actually played a number of times with Miles, but Miles said that he should learn to read music (so the story goes)

anyway, Miles recorded everything that he ever did.... so in theory there should be some Miles/Hendrix tapes in the Miles archive. <img src="graemlins/surprised.gif" border="0" alt="[Surprised]" />

I saw that movie and thought it was very tragic: he was intesly dark on stage. That version of Machine Gun is absolutely EPIC!!!! It makes pansies out of everything that calls itself intense Rock and Roll -- He is clearly dealing with so much: tradition, tragedy strife suffering, religion: all these things are encapsulated in that piece and more: He has the depth that only someone who is working out of the "tradition of teh New" as in the improvisational tradition of African American music and the Blues can understand, and he shows that he is working intesly with that tradition and all of its burdens.

in fact it clearly transends Rock and becomes MUSIC: no, becomes EVENT!! No, MANIFESTATION!!!

as does several versions of Machine Gun

Did you notice at the beginning there is an incident with one of teh promoters who (if memory serves me) basically either kind of slaps Hendrix or tells him to shut up . . . something like that . . . it lends to the sense of tragedy to the whole proceedings as it reveals the kind of things a black performer had to deal with even in the 'open' environment of the times.
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

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"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by pfflam:
<strong>He actually played a number of times with Miles, but Miles said that he should learn to read music (so the story goes)

anyway, Miles recorded everything that he ever did.... so in theory there should be some Miles/Hendrix tapes in the Miles archive. <img src="graemlins/surprised.gif" border="0" alt="[Surprised]" /> </strong><hr></blockquote>

Hmmm, interesting point there. The director said too that Miles went to Hendrix's funeral...which was surprising since; Miles didn't like funerals and he didn't "get out much" in that period of his life. Sure would be interesting if the Hendrix family has some tapes they are sitting on. It took this director 30 years to get the money, time and permission to finish this documentary.

[quote]<strong>I saw that movie and thought it was very tragic: he was intesly dark on stage. That version of Machine Gun is absolutely EPIC!!!! It makes pansies out of everything that calls itself intense Rock and Roll -- He is clearly dealing with so much: tradition, tragedy strife suffering, religion: all these things are encapsulated in that piece and more: He has the depth that only someone who is working out of the "tradition of teh New" as in the improvisational tradition of African American music and the Blues can understand, and he shows that he is working intesly with that tradition and all of its burdens.

in fact it clearly transends Rock and becomes MUSIC: no, becomes EVENT!! No, MANIFESTATION!!!

as does several versions of Machine Gun

</strong><hr></blockquote>

Errr, "Right on dude!" <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />

The version he did at the Fillmore East rocked (Buddy Miles played drums...?) Actually, he seemed very distant at this show. He came on stage and said hello and peace and love..."but if you ain't into peace, then **** you..." This version of "Machine Gun" is the original unedited version, which was cut in the first documentary for time's sake. It was cool to see the audiance last night applauding between songs...

[quote]<strong>Did you notice at the beginning there is an incident with one of teh promoters who (if memory serves me) basically either kind of slaps Hendrix or tells him to shut up . . . something like that . . . it lends to the sense of tragedy to the whole proceedings as it reveals the kind of things a black performer had to deal with even in the 'open' environment of the times.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Didn't see that...? Hendrix not only had to deal with the racial issues but also being a "superstar". In this documentary it showed that Hendrix's promoters wanted him top billing, even though the concert promoters wanted each days performers listed in alphbetical order. But they got what they wanted...Hendrix (as in Woodstock) played last and onstage at 2:00 AM in the morning! :eek:
I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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post #4 of 5
I meant that Miles recorded all of his own studio jam sessions.

An interesting note: Mike Stern who played guitar with Miles in the 80s said that when he played with Miles he couldn't play the way that he would have liked to (which would have been Be-boppy, and to my mind infinitly more boring, as in his other stuff w/out Miles) because Miles just wanted him to play loud and "sound like Jimmy"

Apparently Miles had invredible respect for Hendrix . . . and from Miles, that means a hell of a lot.

[ 02-17-2002: Message edited by: pfflam ]</p>
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #5 of 5
also, I think that the movie that I saw was some special presentation of the concert footage, uncut and not edited for a documentary . . .


also, if you gaven't heard the Berkeley version where the security walkie-talkies are coming over the amps: its incredible.

There is also this version that I have on an EP that has an excellent introduction slow and quite: the EP has a picture of a mermaid on the cover.... ever heard it?

but clearly the live version of Are You Experienced on the Hendrix Concerts double album (with the oil painting on the cover) is the high point of contemporary music!!!!
(as I say over and over on these boards)
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
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