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Scientific analysis finds iPhone LCD trumps Nexus One OLED - Page 3

post #81 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

It must be true. The article says it is scientific. And the guy who did it is a Doctor.

No, he's a 'PhD', which as you know stands for 'piled higher and deeper.' Just like the wisdom in your posts. Keep them missives comin', buddy!
post #82 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

No, he's a 'PhD', which as you know stands for 'piled higher and deeper.' Just like the wisdom in your posts. Keep them missives comin', buddy!

I believe he was going for a little humor, at least it had me laughing out loud....a la 'Spies Like Us'.
post #83 of 185
Complete lies.

First notice how the two Mars photos are not completly the same. If they are the same, the are zoomed in at slightly different locations. That is hardly scientific. As you would want the exact same photos.

Second, it is not good science to have a preconceived notion. The 'scientist' stated he felt the Nexus was buggy and the iPhone is great. It seems a fair scientific aproach would compare the screens and nothing but the screens. As no matter if the Nexus One is buggy or not, it has no bearing on the quality of the screen.

But that brings me to my 3rd point, that it all could be software related. Gizmodo has reported that 3rd party browsers and photos apps don't seem to have this problem. So maybe Google decided for some reason to display photos a certain way and for most task that works great.

Which brings me to my last point, that again this 'scientist' has preconcieved notions that OLED is 'bad' technology and needs more years to perfect. Well if he wanted to test LCD vs OLED, then be my guest. Get a large sampling of panels and hook them up to the same software/hardware and put out images and see how they handle them. I think in all cases as someone mention before, software and even hardware should be taken out of the equation and the panels tested that way.

Now, they don't provide the NASA Mars picture for reference, but I did load the site in my Zune HD browser and could see the difference between the pictures comporable to what I see on Macbook Alu display. So, in this case the OLED display on the Zune HD appears to be able to show that picture properly. So I am still confused about why OLED is so bad. And yes Sunlight is a negative, but its not like in direct sunlight that I have ideal conditions on any device I have had the chance to play with (Zune HD, iPhone 2G, MacBook, HTC Touch Pro 2)

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post #84 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rokken View Post

I seriously doubt the next iPhone will sport OLED screen. Apple seems to be adopting all its products with IPS screen after the iMac got IPS last year and more recently iPad so I wager we would see an updated MacBook Pro with IPS screen in the near future and a new iPhone with IPS screen in June.

wait, IPS could be a disadvantage on the iPhone. Wide viewing angle isn't welcome for many phone-users due to privacy issues.
post #85 of 185
I just want iPhone 4 to have a A4 like processor and a OLED screen for the enhanced battery life. I could care less about the picture quality. All the OLED's I've seen though look way better than the iPhone screen.
post #86 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

It must be true. The article says it is scientific. And the guy who did it is a Doctor.

Quote:
Dr. Raymond Soneira - Founder, President and CEO of DisplayMate Technologies Corporation

Dr. Raymond Soneira The developer of DisplayMate is an internationally recognized research scientist with a distinguished career that spans physics, computer science, and television system design. Dr. Soneira obtained his Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from Princeton University, spent 5 years as a Long-Term Member of the world famous Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, another 5 years as a Principal Investigator in the Computer Systems Research Laboratory at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and has designed, tested, and installed color television broadcast equipment for the CBS Television Network Engineering and Development Department. He has authored over 35 research articles in scientific journals in physics and computer science, including Scientific American.

Dr. Soneira's background covers a wide spectrum of internationally recognized leading edge research in electronics, optics, applied mathematics, theoretical and experimental physics. For example: he has designed color television broadcast equipment for the CBS Television Network, built a computer mathematical model of a television system for optimizing the camera to receiver performance and accuracy of the optics and electronics for CBS, a leader of a team at Bell Labs Research that built intelligent autonomous mobile robots, designed an all-electronic 360 degree viewing angle imaging laser range finder using the parallax principle, did the mathematical foundation of the fine guidance system for the Hubble Space Telescope, built the accepted standard model of the Milky Way Galaxy (which is named after him), built theoretical high redshift cosmological and stellar models for the Hubble Space Telescope, has done fundamental work on the analysis of clustering and super-clustering of galaxies, plus work in Relativity and nuclear physics.

Dr. Soneira works with the 200+ publications that use DisplayMate for editorial testing and lab reviews of video hardware. He is a Contributing Editor to Widescreen Review Magazine, and has written numerous articles for Consumer, Professional, display marketing, and Research publications, such as Widescreen Review Magazine, PC Magazine, Ziff-Davis' ExtremeTech, CNET, Presentations Magazine, Maximum PC Magazine, the Society for Information Display's Information Display Magazine, and a large number of display marketing and Professional Audio-Video publications. His articles have been translated into several languages and have appeared in over 30 publications worldwide.

Yes Genius, compared to you, this "doctor" does appear highly questionable, doesn't he?
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post #87 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post

I just want iPhone 4 to have a A4 like processor and a OLED screen for the enhanced battery life. I could care less about the picture quality. All the OLED's I've seen though look way better than the iPhone screen.

I have yet to see any evidence that an AMOLED display is better on power than an LCD display with an LED backlight for typical usage on such a small display.
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post #88 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by UltimateKylie View Post

Complete lies.

First notice how the two Mars photos are not completly the same. If they are the same, the are zoomed in at slightly different locations. That is hardly scientific. As you would want the exact same photos.

Second, it is not good science to have a preconceived notion. The 'scientist' stated he felt the Nexus was buggy and the iPhone is great. It seems a fair scientific aproach would compare the screens and nothing but the screens. As no matter if the Nexus One is buggy or not, it has no bearing on the quality of the screen.

But that brings me to my 3rd point, that it all could be software related. Gizmodo has reported that 3rd party browsers and photos apps don't seem to have this problem. So maybe Google decided for some reason to display photos a certain way and for most task that works great.

Which brings me to my last point, that again this 'scientist' has preconcieved notions that OLED is 'bad' technology and needs more years to perfect. Well if he wanted to test LCD vs OLED, then be my guest. Get a large sampling of panels and hook them up to the same software/hardware and put out images and see how they handle them. I think in all cases as someone mention before, software and even hardware should be taken out of the equation and the panels tested that way.

Now, they don't provide the NASA Mars picture for reference, but I did load the site in my Zune HD browser and could see the difference between the pictures comporable to what I see on Macbook Alu display. So, in this case the OLED display on the Zune HD appears to be able to show that picture properly. So I am still confused about why OLED is so bad. And yes Sunlight is a negative, but its not like in direct sunlight that I have ideal conditions on any device I have had the chance to play with (Zune HD, iPhone 2G, MacBook, HTC Touch Pro 2)

Take heart. The Sun will rise tomorrow--somewhere.
post #89 of 185
So no OLED in next gen iPhone \
I don't blame Apple, it seems OLED still has some rough edges.

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post #90 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Unfortunately Apple thinks 4:3 is the wave of the future. They advertise how great video and movie playback is on the iPad, yet they slap it with a 4:3 screen. Keep dreaming.

This is a non-issue. 4:3 is roughly the size of a sheet of paper. 16:9 is roughly the size of Legal Paper. I have rarely seen a book that is Legal paper size or anywhere close to 16:9 ratio. The ipad is meant for reading and meant to be held comfortably. Everything else is perks.

Besides, not even BluRay discs are all in 16:9. I have a disc that states (1080p resolution, 16:9), yet native playback on my bluray player shows black bars on the top and bottom.
post #91 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

It does not surprise me from everything I've read that its better. OLED will be better at some point - I think its just not there yet (witness: no one can make one for a 19" TV for less than the price of a house.)

Don't draw the wrong conclusion here. The Nexus One phone's OLED display is inferior to the 3GS's LCD display. That DOES NOT MEAN that all small OLED displays are the same. I guarantee this was a cost issue, and if it were not as important, they could have used a far better OLED display.

Obviously there are a few different types of OLED displays, but if anyone is doubting the technology itself, take a look at the 10.1" Sony OLED TV. It's picture is incredible (and it's OLD)
post #92 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacHarborGuy View Post

The ipad is meant for reading and meant to be held comfortably. Everything else is perks.

In the context of the topic, LCDs don't necessarily facilitate comfortable long-term reading like an e-ink display would.

I'm starting to think they had decided to make the iPad a last minute competitor in the e-reader market. Tablet first, book reader second.
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post #93 of 185
HTC have always been bad at video drivers, they released a winmo phone a few years ago with disabled ATI graphics hardware because they couldn't optimise the drivers.

The HTC Magic a Google Experience phone has a 65k display.

So does anyone know if Windows Mobile 7 has moved beyond the 65 thousand colour displays of previous versions of WinMo?

The iPhone has a 16 million colour display.
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post #94 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

How do you propose that I use the display without the phone?

My point is that his testing method does not prove which display is best, just which software + phone hardware + display combination is best.

When a normal display (e.g. TV or computer monitor) review is done, the various displays are compared while connected to the same video source. In this case the 2 displays are connected to completely different sources.

This makes it kind of hard to conclude which display is best, just which total package is best.
post #95 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by UltimateKylie View Post

I think in all cases as someone mention before, software and even hardware should be taken out of the equation and the panels tested that way.

http://forum.xda-developers.com/show...=637063&page=3
post #96 of 185
Well, all that seems unexpected only to someone who does not really sit in the front row while observing the modern technology.
But the purpose of the article is crystal clear. iPhone 2010 is probably going to sport OLED display.

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post #97 of 185
http://www.flickr.com/photos/andyi/s...7623251786252/

He discovered much the same thing. Everybody fixates on the hardware, but the software of a digital camera is as important. Apple's software does a much better job in many ways. If you're looking for a reliable camera that adjusts to different lighting conditions, it's the iPhone.
post #98 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

There are two shades: "iPhone" and "not iPhone."

Do you ever stop and notice how much of a ridiculous fanboy you sound like?
post #99 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by spudit View Post

I believe he was going for a little humor, at least it had me laughing out loud....a la 'Spies Like Us'.

It's good to know that some folks got it.
post #100 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisEMayle View Post

Yes Genius, compared to you, this "doctor" does appear highly questionable, doesn't he?

I'd say that compared to any competent scientific test, his method appears highly questionable.
post #101 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacHarborGuy View Post

The ipad is meant for reading

Yeah. Certainly not best for the 'web or movies or HDTV. And those are the things I'd use a tablet for.
post #102 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by clexman View Post

My point is that his testing method does not prove which display is best, just which software + phone hardware + display combination is best.

This makes it kind of hard to conclude which display is best, just which total package is best.

Bingo. And from what he presents, it seem seems that the N1 loses big time.
post #103 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by UltimateKylie View Post

Complete lies.

First notice how the two Mars photos are not completly the same. If they are the same, the are zoomed in at slightly different locations. That is hardly scientific. As you would want the exact same photos.

I understand the other points, but not this. the photo angle looks quite similar. It looks to me like any difference is at the very edges, the screens are a different aspect ratio.
post #104 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Seems to be the same reason consumers favour shiny screens over matte.

As long as the colours are set to 100% MegaVibrance it's all good, right? Who cares about colour accuracy and correct brightness?

But hey, yet ANOTHER article praising the iPhone (or denigrating the competition) so it MUST be "pure garbage."

In all due fairness though, Dr. Soniera in the article stated that the iPhone's screen isn't the best there is, in fact, it fails quite miserably when other picture qualities are factored. In terms of color accuracy, OLEDs are more accurate by far, mainly due to there being no back light, so colors appear more nature. Whether colors appear over saturated, under saturated, gradated or not, those factors are largely determined by the internal rendering capabilities of electronic devices. To me, this article doesn't say that OLED screens are lacking, but rather the color processing capabilities of the Nexus are sub-par.
post #105 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


How much time do you spend watching video on a small handheld device?

About 2 hours a day. (train commute to work)

So yes, I'd like 16:9.
post #106 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

I always thought my iPhone screen was fine.

Try watching video in a less with brightly lit room. Any darkish scene is just a washed out mid-grey square. It looks dreadful. I've seen plenty of LCDs with terrible black levels before, but the iPhone is the worst of them all.

At least it has a fast response rate.
post #107 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

I'd say that compared to any competent scientific test, his method appears highly questionable.

Please explain what it is about "his method" that "appears highly questionable"?

Dr. Soneira indicated that he will publish in the second article (of three) the measurements for: color temperature and chromaticity, color gamut, intensity scale and gamma, brightness decrease with viewing angle, black level and contrast ratio shift with viewing angle, color shift with viewing angle, RGB display power consumption, OLED and LCD spectra. Are you saying that you anticipate the way these are achieved, or the measurements themselves are questionable?

In this first article, he discussed the measurements (for peak brightness, black-level brightness, contrast ratio, screen reflectance, high ambient light contrast rating, dynamic color and dynamic contrast, color depth and granularity, and display image) after generating the analytical test patterns with a spectroradiometer and measuring "in a perfectly dark lab to avoid light contamination with devices' backlight set for maximum brightness with the automatic brightness light sensor control turned off, and running on their AC power adapter with a fully charged battery, so that the battery performance and state was not a factor in the results." Was it something about this method that is questionable or lacks competence?

Clexman said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by clexman View Post

My point is that his testing method does not prove which display is best, just which software + phone hardware + display combination is best.

...

This makes it kind of hard to conclude which display is best, just which total package is best.

However, Dr. Soneira stated up front that the "in-depth measurements and analysis were for the OLED and LCD displays on the Google Nexus One and the Apple iPhone 3GS", not the display technologies themselves. He said, "the inner details of the display technologies are very interesting, but our concern here is to evaluate the actual image and picture quality that they deliver." Do his methods not support his objectives?

He further stated that, "some of this is undoubtedly due to poor integration of the display hardware with the Android OS and software. Much of it, however, is simply due to very poor factory calibration and quality control." Was it this assertion you find incompetent?

Please explain, as your point about scientific testing competence is unclear to me. What would the "competent scientific test" consist of?
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post #108 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisEMayle View Post

Please explain what it is about "his method" that "appears highly questionable"?

Dr. Soneira indicated that he will publish in the second article .......... {SNIP}

Please explain, as your point about scientific testing competence is unclear to me. What would the "competent scientific test" consist of?

Excellent post. You expect him to provide a substantive answer?

Good luck. iGenius is just another low value-added bomb-thrower.
post #109 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymccrae View Post

Gizmodo who also picked up the same story, show the problem also affecting the browser. So no the article is not a lie.

http://gizmodo.com/5477320/the-nexus...secret-updated

lol, did you go to your own link? He's already updated the article.
post #110 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

In all due fairness though, Dr. Soniera in the article stated that the iPhone's screen isn't the best there is, in fact, it fails quite miserably when other picture qualities are factored. In terms of color accuracy, OLEDs are more accurate by far, mainly due to there being no back light, so colors appear more nature. Whether colors appear over saturated, under saturated, gradated or not, those factors are largely determined by the internal rendering capabilities of electronic devices. To me, this article doesn't say that OLED screens are lacking, but rather the color processing capabilities of the Nexus are sub-par.

I'm inclinded to agree with you. The images that appear on my Zune HD's OLED screen don't seem to show any of the banding the N1 has.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

Do you ever stop and notice how much of a ridiculous fanboy you sound like?

Don't bother asking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I assume you have never bothered to actually use one. I have (a friend has one), and it's a very, very slick device. The screen is, to my eyes, amazing, and the overall speed and snappiness of the Nexus is leagues ahead of the iPhone. And multi-tasking is, as you might expect, enough to make any iPhone owner green with envy. I know I am.

Him? Actually use a device other than the Apple product before just declaring the Apple product superior? Noooo... That's much too much work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Seems to be the same reason consumers favour shiny screens over matte.

As long as the colours are set to 100% MegaVibrance it's all good, right? Who cares about colour accuracy and correct brightness?

But hey, yet ANOTHER article praising the iPhone (or denigrating the competition) so it MUST be "pure garbage."

So by your logic, any article that praises Apple's competition and shows the short-comings of the iPhone or any other Apple product must also be "pure garbage" too right?
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post #111 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I guess it comes down priorities. Personally I would put text readability and clarity as no.1 on the list, and the OLED in the Nexus One, with it's deep blacks and razor sharp resolution is just streets ahead of the low-res (comparatively speaking) and washed out iPhone display.

If Apple were to offer a choice on the next iPhone between LCD and OLED, I'd choose OLED in an instant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I assume you have never bothered to actually use one. I have (a friend has one), and it's a very, very slick device. The screen is, to my eyes, amazing, and the overall speed and snappiness of the Nexus is leagues ahead of the iPhone. And multi-tasking is, as you might expect, enough to make any iPhone owner green with envy. I know I am.

I agree 100%. I must wear reading glasses to use my iPhone for email and browsing, or zoom in quite a bit and do the scroll right/left thing. With the Nexus One I am able to read the text without reading glasses. That alone makes the N1 a better device for 95% of my usage.

The contrast is amazing on the Nexus One, and the blacks are actually black, no matter what brightness the screen is set to. My only gripe with the N1's screen is it is a bit over-saturated in the reds while watching video. That's a software issue, easily corrected when Google gets around to it. I can wait.

The resolution on the Nexus One is amazing. Check my twitter post from yesterday comparing screen captures of Google Earth from a Nexus One and an iPhone. I should try to take a picture of the two screens side by side to show that you really can see the difference, it's not just an issue of the screen resolution producing a larger picture.
post #112 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymccrae View Post

Gizmodo who also picked up the same story, show the problem also affecting the browser. So no the article is not a lie.

http://gizmodo.com/5477320/the-nexus...secret-updated

Sheesh...you seriously think that just because Gizmodo aggregated the post onto their site that it's an accurate story? How much origianl content does Gizmodo (any Gawker site) produce? All they do is scour the net and repost other blog's/site's stuff. That doesn't make the original story accurate.

The conclusions in the original article are flawed. I tested myself, as did my friend with an N1, using the same photo the original tests did.

In the Gallery app, yes, there is banding. In the Browser app, there is not. SIDE-BY-SIDE on my N1 vs my iPhone 3G[s], in the browser, the N1 looks better, no banding, nothing negative. The application is flawed, not the hardware or OS. Google will update it, problem solved. Even if Google doesn't update Gallery, there are third party apps for viewing your pictures already (I use Astro File Viewer).

Look, I'm as big an Apple Fanboy as the next guy around here. Check my post history here and across all the other sites I'm sure we both visit. I've got 4 iPhones, one of each model. It was an amazing device that couldn't be compared to for 2.5 years...but like it or not, the Nexus One puts the iPhone line to shame in almost every respect. The only thing the iPhone does better, and not by much, is act as an iTunes-media media player.

Apple may wow us with the 4th gen iPhone, but it's vaporware until I see it. It's also going to be a locked down, Apple's way or the highway, device where I can't decide what the look and feel is, or even what kind of apps I want to put on it. Not that I want boob-jiggling apps, but it pisses me off that Apple's decided to go all prude on us and delete 5,000 "suggestive" apps. (I'll admit to having a swimsuit model app...LOL)



Quote:
Originally Posted by dcdttu View Post

This article isn't true. Did you guys test the N1?

The problem is that the Gallery app in the N1's 2.1 Android software is rendering images in such a way that the bars show up. Has nothing to do with the display (and by the way OLED and LED displays are apparently typically 18 bit, but coded in 16 bit. The iPhone is no exception).

If you go to the Browser in the N1 and go to the exact image of the sunset on Mars, you get a beautiful, barless rendering. This also works fine in any of the image viewers available in the Market. The display is a gorgeous OLED display capable of displaying as many colors as any other modern smartphone, including the iPhone...

You guys should update this article, as it is not true.

The article is true. It's true in that some scientist performed an experiment and reported his results. What's inaccurate are the conclusions that the scientist made. He used one application to compare the results, and didn't allow for the fact that the application might be the problem, not the hardware. The application will be fixed, then the tests will be completely invalidated from that point forward.
post #113 of 185
Ha ha. You guys all get so overly stressed with each and every AI article. You're all going to die of stress if you don't just chill out a bit.

Reminder: This is an All-things-Apple website so if you're allergic to apples, ...


Interesting article. I hope they do a comparison with the Motorola Droid too.
post #114 of 185
It seems very common nowadays that people must confess that they own apple products so they deserve the rights to complain apple.

Come on, if you think iPhone pales to N1, don't have to say you own 4 iPhones.
post #115 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous guy View Post

In the context of the topic, LCDs don't necessarily facilitate comfortable long-term reading like an e-ink display would.

I'm starting to think they had decided to make the iPad a last minute competitor in the e-reader market. Tablet first, book reader second.


I have used a few E-Ink displays, and in all honestly, I am not impressed with those screens at all. Also, the whole idea of "LCD's don't necessarily facilitate comfortable long-term reading" is kind of BS.

When using a desktop computer, we are sitting with out back straight up in a specific position for possibly hours on end. That, in and of itself, is not a "natural reading experience". At the end of the day my eyes are not hurting because I have looked at an LCD for too long, but rather, my back is killing me from sitting in that position.

The Sun is many times brighter than an LCD backlit screen, and I don't hear people complain about their eyes hurting during day to day outdoor activity.

Using a laptop, even sitting on a couch, is also not a "natural reading experience" because of how unnaturally you have to hold the laptop. Flat on your lap or on a table in front of you. You also need to have it positioned at a distance so you can type on the keyboard.

The iPad, as well as other tablet devices before and after the iPad, have a much more natural shape and size that fits a reading device, just like a Kindle.

Also remember that not all E-Ink screens are the same technology. Some use actually pixels that rotate from black to white (or some shade of light gray), while others are little black dots that poke thru white or gray surface. All of the technologies, however, are slow. They have GREAT battery life, but everyone who I have talked to locally that has seen or used an eBook reader does not believe that the technology is anywhere near "mass market", and probably won't be for another 5-10 years.

Don't get me wrong though. I do want color E-Ink to become a technology that is used everywhere. Think of a color E-Ink computer monitor with response times that equal that of even the average LCD monitor.


We won't know how well or how bad the iPad will be for reading until it's actually out and people use it for extended periods of time.
post #116 of 185
When I first came across this article I read it on my Nexus one... I could CLEARLY see the difference between the two pictures, on the iPhone result I didn't see any banding at all. If this test was actually accurate then I shouldn't have been able to tell the difference between the two when viewing the pictures....

Edit:

Decided to look into this a little more.



I used the colour scale image on http://tech-lobby.com/wp-content/upl.../scaletest.jpg and opened it with Gallery and then with Astro Image Viewer. The image viewer had less banding. I even took screenshots with the Dalvic Debug Monitor to see side by side. The Gallery is lower quality, thus proving the results of this test flawed. Even if the iPhone screen is better it would be due to software, not hardware. Therefore "iPhone LCD trumps Nexus One OLED is an inaccurate statement, the test was limited by software, not hardware.
post #117 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisEMayle View Post

He further stated that, "some of this is undoubtedly due to poor integration of the display hardware with the Android OS and software. Much of it, however, is simply due to very poor factory calibration and quality control." Was it this assertion you find incompetent?

Please explain, as your point about scientific testing competence is unclear to me. What would the "competent scientific test" consist of?

Yes he is incompentent, he is saying that Nexus One only uses 16 bit color so it has banding and a poor pictures quality. If he had opened the same images on the browser or on other pitcure viewers he had noticed that there is no banding and a superb quality picture.

All the results about picture quality, lower display technology are totally wrong.

Scientific? I don't whink so
post #118 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

Yes he is incompentent, he is saying that Nexus One only uses 16 bit color so it has banding and a poor pictures quality. If he had opened the same images on the browser or on other pitcure viewers he had noticed that there is no banding and a superb quality picture.

All the results about picture quality, lower display technology are totally wrong.

Scientific? I don't whink so

I hope you don't mind; I sent your response to Dr. Soneira requesting his response for clarification.
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post #119 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisEMayle View Post

I hope you don't mind; I sent your response to Dr. Soneira requesting his response for clarification.

Better send this link: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=637063

And if I have to testbanding in a device I will use an image with the native resolution to avoid any resizing artifact, he is not using native resolutions nor for the iPhone nor for the Nexus and the only thing that he has proved is that Nexus has bugs in image scaling
post #120 of 185
[CENTER]"Soneira said eyeballing the screens isn't enough."

Hmmm? For those who actually used their device/smartphone displays... Viewing the most pleasant looking display of Information/Media is certainly the most important criteria.[/CENTER]
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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