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Apple exec Tim Cook talks Apple TV, A4 processor, more

post #1 of 150
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Speaking in San Francisco Tuesday, Apple Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook explained why the Apple TV is still considered a "hobby," and talked about custom-built chips in future products.

Apple TV "still a hobby"

Cook said he believes the Apple TV is an outstanding product, but there just isn't a large enough market to make the hardware worth a great deal of concentration from his company. The product is a "hobby," he said, because it doesn't compare to the phone, computer and MP3 player markets in terms of sales.

"Apple TV is still a hobby," he said. "We've been very clear about that."

But he also suggested the company's set-top-box device wouldn't necessarily lay dormant. It may just take time for the potential market to grow.

"Because our gut says something's there, we're continuing to invest in this," he said. "But today, it's still just a hobby."

Last October, Apple released the 3.0 software update for Apple TV, featuring a redesigned main menu that made navigating content simpler and faster. It also added support for the new iTunes LP and iTunes Extras formats.

Future products to feature custom silicon

Unsurprisingly, Cook said that future Apple products will feature custom-built chips, much like the new A4 processor found in the forthcoming iPad. He said Apple became wary of purchasing chips from other companies designed for different tasks.

"We felt that we had the best knowledge of what we wanted the silicon to do," he said.

By designing its own silicon, he said, Apple can create chips that are best-suited for the company's products, allowing them to run cooler and more power efficient.

"Apple has, for years, been in the silicon design business," he said. "When we were on the PowerPC architecture, Apple always personally crafted the northbridge and southbridge chipset, and so it's not new to us."

Keeping it simple

One focus for Apple, Cook revealed, is to keep matters simple. The Cupertino, Calif., company hasn't been interested in doing large acquisitions because of value and compatibility issues.

"We've always been about making the best product, not having the highest market share or the highest revenue," he said. "And so acquiring a company so our revenue gets larger isn't something that drives us."

The same philosophy applies to Apple's product line. Cook said the company doesn't want to overextend itself, and noted that the company's entire line of products could fit on one table. The only other high-revenue, publicly traded companies that could likely say that would be oil companies, he said.

Most companies, he said, simply aim to get bigger as they become more successful, but Apple has intentionally avoided that approach.

"The management team at Apple would never let that happen," Cook said. "That's not what we're about."

Other notes of interest:

Apple scaled back building stores during the recession, but is picking up steam again in building new retail outlets. He said forthcoming Apple stores in Shanghai and London will "make your jaw drop."

Recent NPD data shows Apple with a 22 percent unit share of desktop sales, with 42 percent of revenue. Cook said he believes the new iMac is the best desktop on the market. "I think people will continue to want a very gorgeous, large screen, all-in-one, simple to use, very elegant machine, and we're going to continue to deliver it."

With 300 million total worldwide PC sales per year, Cook said there is plenty of room for Apple to grow the Mac platform. The company's biggest target remains Windows switchers. "What we have to do is convince Windows users to switch, and we can provide a much better experience than they (Microsoft) can."

The single-carrier model seen with the iPhone and AT&T in the U.S. allows for simplicity and innovation. Without a partnership with AT&T, Apple likely wouldn't have been able to implement visual voicemail with the initial iPhone.

The Mac OS is "amazingly scalable," ranging from Mac computers to the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. In a joke about Microsoft that earned laughter, he said the scalability of Mac OS X gives Apple an advantage over others who are "geographically north."

The iPod touch has been an integral part of the success of the iPhone OS. Every device they sell, he said, helps to fuel more application sales from the App Store. "The iPod touch has been a runaway hit," Cook said.
post #2 of 150
A pretty balanced view from Cook.

The Mac OS is "amazingly scalable"

Aint that the truth!
post #3 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

A pretty balanced view from Cook.

The Mac OS is "amazingly scalable"

Aint that the truth!

Now if they would only fix the BT on the iPhone to work properly like it should and fix the menu system with Front Row, I would be happy.
post #4 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Cook said he believes the Apple TV is an outstanding product, but there just isn't a large enough market to make the hardware worth a great deal of concentration from his company. The product is a "hobby," he said, because it doesn't compare to the phone, computer and MP3 player markets in terms of sales.

"Apple TV is still a hobby," he said. "We've been very clear about that."

This tells me that 2011 is going to be the year of AppleTV, much the same way that 2010 is already the year of the iPad. I recall Apple saying similar things about the market for tablets, netbooks and such, just a little over a year ago......
post #5 of 150
Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company.

The A4 - I'm glad he mentioned the part about Apple custom designing their North and South Bridges. Apple back in the day used to custom make many of their ASIC chips at great expense. They now are smart enough (and have the size and shipment numbers) to go the custom route and save money in the process.

Mac OS X has plenty of life and we're now moving into a future where Cocoa has ascended to Chief of frameworks and the iPhone platform is expanding into other products. We should continue to see good scalability from this OS.
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post #6 of 150
Curious how Apple seem almost completely uninterested in the living room. Microsoft, Sony, Netflix, and others will own it for decades to come.
post #7 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company.

The A4 - I'm glad he mentioned the part about Apple custom designing their North and South Bridges. Apple back in the day used to custom make many of their ASIC chips at great expense. They now are smart enough (and have the size and shipment numbers) to go the custom route and save money in the process.

Mac OS X has plenty of life and we're now moving into a future where Cocoa has ascended to Chief of frameworks and the iPhone platform is expanding into other products. We should continue to see good scalability from this OS.

Thanks for a sane comment. Finally I see one around here . . .
post #8 of 150
I'm glad to hear that folks at apple are not forgetting about the touch. Still waiting for a camera/mic to arrive.

Also good news is that apple will not try to overstretch itself (ahem Google ahem). There were rumors of an apple search engine to compete with Google on mobile, which I hope won't come true.
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post #9 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company.

Thanks for the clarity. So many people hate the Apple TV for delivering what is without a doubt a spiritless experience. However, 100% of that is directly attributable to content providers for doing what they do best--trying to find out ways of fucking consumers instead of figuring out the best way to give them what they want--content.

That is the single reason why I pirate, and I'll be happy to admit as much if some idiotic content owner were to ask me why I do so. They claim it takes away from their revenue, but I'd be happy to pay for their product and add to their revenue if they gave me what I want, how I wanted it.

I don't need silly, arbitrary constraints of content. The fact that I have 24 hours to view a rental is the most ridiculous concept known to mankind. It's like an executive got hit with a anvil upside his head, spit out this 24-hour nonsense in a moment of semi-conscisouness, and it became so.

And I can view Season 1 of TV Show X and Season 3, but not Season 2?? because...well, I could care less what the reason is. I'd pay for it if it was available, but as it stands I am firing up Vuze and downloading FREE content to my heart's content.
post #10 of 150
Who wants to bet that they're developing a secret OS X that runs on ARM? I don't know much about ARM, but could it compete with an i7 as far as GHz or scalability?

It must suck to be a developer not knowing when Apple will switch processor platforms. I know if I was M$ or Adobe, I'd hate to rewrite everything again to support a new instruction set.
post #11 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company.

Wal-Mart just bought Vudu. Between Netflix, Wal-Mart, Hulu and a host of other options, Apple may need to get more serious about AppleTV soon or they will be pushed off the cliff by the movie industry and these other companies aligning against them.

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post #12 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

but I'd be happy to pay for their product and add to their revenue if they gave me what I want, how I wanted it.

So basically your way or the highway?
post #13 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Curious how Apple seem almost completely uninterested in the living room. Microsoft, Sony, Netflix, and others will own it for decades to come.

Look at all the work these guys are putting into the living room with very little return. Netflix seems to be the only success story so far. Every Blockbuster in my area has disappeared.

I have an Apple TV and it does enough for me. You can rent movies for $1.00 less than Comcast on Demand, which is a good enough reason for me to use it.
post #14 of 150
It's refreshing to hear from someone talk about not taking their company down the path with guns ablazin' and consume everything in its path, only to die a painful death in the end when it took too much too fast.

I like Apple's conservative approach and it's methods for actually thinking about it's path with some sense of sanity and logic. It's a primary reason I believe that Apple is in such a strong position when compared to other players in the same field.

I'm happy that Apple ignores folks (like certain vocal members here) that think Apple should do whatever it can to grab every bit of market share, including bottom-of-the-barrel segments.

There will be folks here that surely will find a way to rant / whine about Apple's practices in this article.
post #15 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Wal-Mart just bought Vudu. Between Netflix, Wal-Mart, Hulu and a host of other options, Apple may need to get more serious about AppleTV soon or they will be pushed off the cliff by the movie industry and these other companies aligning against them.

Yes I think the "Hobby" refrain coming from Apple is a bit silly. An unenthused Apple isn't going to deliver great products and if they cannot deliver great products then they need to open up iTunes so that purchases play nicely on other hardware boxen.

The movie industry was adamant that Apple not get the type of control they have with music distribution and they do have more options because Apple never delivered the magic bullet in the Apple TV as compared to the iPod Magic Bullet.

Apple has to swim upstream just like everyone else.
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post #16 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The same philosophy applies to Apple's product line. Cook said the company doesn't want to overextend itself, and noted that the company's entire line of products could fit on one table. The only other high-revenue, publicly traded companies that could likely say that would be oil companies, he said.]

I know what he is implying and I like that Apple's product line is so streamlined however the oil companies have way more product than would fit on a table. Oil, grease, gas, diesel fuel, chemicals of every hydro-carbon variety, etc. So, bad comparison.

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post #17 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

This tells me that 2011 is going to be the year of AppleTV, much the same way that 2010 is already the year of the iPad. I recall Apple saying similar things about the market for tablets, netbooks and such, just a little over a year ago......

I hope that you turn out to be correct, but I have a feeling we may not be this lucky. Yes, Apple did say these things about tablets leading up to their announcement of the iPad, but they have been tossing the "it's just a hobby" grenades at us for much longer. I think they are trying to make a point, which is, don't hold your breath.

Now I suppose it is possible, that with the iPad and iPhone, that it is just taking longer for them to get the Apple TV ready for primetime, but I don't think so. I think they could have easily updated the hardware 3 times by now, and wowed us with a software overhaul to catch up to the other living room competitors. But so far not a peep for hardware, and only minor software updates here and there.

They have a long way to go. I hope you're right about 2011.
post #18 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Curious how Apple seem almost completely uninterested in the living room. Microsoft, Sony, Netflix, and others will own it for decades to come.

I'm not sure if the living room will exist for decades to come... Kinda like the dining room is disappearing now (merging to the living room)... Soon it will just be "the room" because there will be no focus and everyone will use their iPad or iGoggles or whatever new convergent device is out.
post #19 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company.

True story, but they are also going after those walking dinosaurs in the publishing industry, so I think they could crack broadcasting if they really made the effort. I'd like to see them go after the set top box makers. The boxes we have now truly suck. If they could integrate ATV into conventional cable set top functions I think they might have a winner. Maybe it just isn't worth the effort?

Either way, I don't think Cook is doing anybody any favors by continuing to publicly call ATV Apple's hobby. Low expectations don't buy you much respect, unless you're Microsoft.

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Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Thanks for a sane comment. Finally I see one around here . . .

Hey read my sig buddy. Read my sig.
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post #20 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Cook said he believes the Apple TV is an outstanding product, but there just isn't a large enough market to make the hardware worth a great deal of concentration from his company. The product is a "hobby," he said, because it doesn't compare to the phone, computer and MP3 player markets in terms of sales. ][/url][/c]

But Apple doesn't seem to want to do or try anything new to the Apple TV to make it a more compelling product. How can they grow the market and make it worthwhile when ATV has stayed basically the same aside from a few software updates? What, exactly, is holding them back? If Mr. Cook wants some ideas, I've got a long list of ideas.
post #21 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Cook said he believes the Apple TV is an outstanding product, but there just isn't a large enough market to make the hardware worth a great deal of concentration from his company. The product is a "hobby," he said, because it doesn't compare to the phone, computer and MP3 player markets in terms of sales.

The fact is Steve Jobs is the largest stock holder of Disney and their content creators, which sort of causes conflicts with other content creators.

You want neutral, go Netflix. They cater to nearly everyone. Only pennies a show, all you can eat.

You get disks if the content creators want that hard ass content protection, you get to stream if they allow it to certain devices too. It's the best of both worlds and why iTunes/Apple TV doesn't cut it.

Apple should buy Roku, mix that into the Apple TV.

http://www.roku.com/netflixplayer/


Quote:
But he also suggested the company's set-top-box device wouldn't necessarily lay dormant. It may just take time for the potential market to grow.

Or waiting till they can buy Netflix cheap.



Quote:
Unsurprisingly, Cook said that future Apple products will feature custom-built chips, much like the new A4 processor found in the forthcoming iPad. He said Apple became wary of purchasing chips from other companies designed for different tasks.

Custom chips for all Apple "consumer" machines is my prediction.

Also no better way to enforce DRM and lock OS X Touchscreen UI, App Store to hardware than that.

Apple wants to sell content, media etc. They want iron clad DRM control, Apple will do so in exchange for renting of content is my prediction.


Quote:
"We've always been about making the best product, not having the highest market share or the highest revenue," he said. "And so acquiring a company so our revenue gets larger isn't something that drives us."

But they did buy several companies and their revenue is getting larger.


Quote:
The same philosophy applies to Apple's product line. Cook said the company doesn't want to overextend itself, and noted that the company's entire line of products could fit on one table. The only other high-revenue, publicly traded companies that could likely say that would be oil companies, he said.

Apple could do well in many aspects of the computing sector if they applied themselves.

The world is crying out for a better OS, just a change, from the crap out of Redmond.



Quote:
Most companies, he said, simply aim to get bigger as they become more successful, but Apple has intentionally avoided that approach.

What the heck is he talking about? Pure propaganda, Apple is huge now, the underdog? NOT.

Grow up Apple, become another GE or Siemens. Don't be scared. Microsoft is vulnerable, eat them!


Quote:
Apple scaled back building stores during the recession, but is picking up steam again in building new retail outlets. He said forthcoming Apple stores in Shanghai and London will "make your jaw drop."


Eye candy church like stores only has a it's effects for so long. People get bored easily, especially if they are struggling in bad recession and avoid the fancy places.

A friend of mine and I like to cruise the malls and bet how many stores have closed, so far I've won every bet.

Quote:
Recent NPD data shows Apple with a 22 percent unit share of desktop sales, with 42 percent of revenue. Cook said he believes the new iMac is the best desktop on the market. "I think people will continue to want a very gorgeous, large screen, all-in-one, simple to use, very elegant machine, and we're going to continue to deliver it."

Good, now make the SSD or hard drive removable please, biggest problem with that device besides the reflective screen.


Quote:
With 300 million total worldwide PC sales per year, Cook said there is plenty of room for Apple to grow the Mac platform. The company's biggest target remains Windows switchers. "What we have to do is convince Windows users to switch, and we can provide a much better experience than they (Microsoft) can."


Did he say "grow the Mac"? Oh sweet jesus, thank you. Hopefully it's the cursor based open OS X UI and not the closed touchscreen iPad UI on Mac's, that would be horrible.



Quote:
The single-carrier model seen with the iPhone and AT&T in the U.S. allows for simplicity and innovation. Without a partnership with AT&T, Apple likely wouldn't have been able to implement visual voicemail with the initial iPhone.

Ok, and with Verison they couldn't do voice and data at the same time neither. OK, we know.


Quote:
The Mac OS is "amazingly scalable," ranging from Mac computers to the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. In a joke about Microsoft that earned laughter, he said the scalability of Mac OS X gives Apple an advantage over others who are "geographically north."

Just don't replace the OS X cursor UI with the iPad touchscreen UI on Mac's please.


Quote:
The iPod touch has been an integral part of the success of the iPhone OS. Every device they sell, he said, helps to fuel more application sales from the App Store. "The iPod touch has been a runaway hit," Cook said.

Screen's too small, but then the iPad is the answer...

Rather have Apps on my MacBook Pro instead so I can use the same Apps on both my iPod Touch and my MacBook Pro and have them sync automagically.
post #22 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by esummers View Post

I'm not sure if the living room will exist for decades to come... Kinda like the dining room is disappearing now...

With clever use of overlays and simulated environs, the walls of our houses will simply disappear and become another information/entertainment delivery device.

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post #23 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

With clever use of overlays and simulated environs, the walls of our houses will simply disappear and become another information/entertainment delivery device.

The iHouse... I think I saw the prototype on youtube once.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHO8l-Bd1O4
post #24 of 150
as defined by SJ only? How about some new iPhone models to appeal to a larger audience, or is one size fits all going to work for Apple long term? OK, with that philosophy, make the best business bPhone then. Let's get on the enterprise. best product only, as in one product fits all, i'm not buying this for a long term strategy.
post #25 of 150
The problem is that when Apple releases something, the media think it's going to take over the world, if it doesn't then it's a flop. Apple TV is probably doing "alright" it's selling and the market is still growing. Apple doesn't normally jump into young technology unless it sees a future potential. I think Apple have a lot planned for the Apple TV, but it's waiting for the market to catch up.
post #26 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something but right now the infrastructure isn't ready. I know of so many areas where Comcast is the only "real" broadband company. .

Exactly...I just read today in the WSJ Movie Studios currently make only $400 million per year from downloads, $18 Billion from DVD sales, $14 Billion from paid and unpaid TV airings and $9 Billion from theatre ticket sales....

$400,000 million on downloads! Talk about being in its 'Infancy!' The big question is can they quantify the bit.torrent losses by not moving quicker with Apple/AppleTV? I would estimate that just like the music industry they are losing millions each day in pirated movies!

Sheez! Get on board! There is a 'tectonic shift' in the way media is going to be consumed!

Edit: A Billion is a thousand million!

Edit: I think I have those numbers right...doing it from memory!

Edit: ABC News has just restructured and by the sounds of it is laying off 25% of its personnel.
post #27 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple TV = Hobby primarily because cracking the Oligarchy of the Broadcast media is a bit tougher than cracking the music industry. If Apple can deliver lower cost shows and broadband speeds and penetration rise they could be onto something.

Hey, the negotiations with the broadcast media for iPad content, such as the 99¢ TV shows with ABC and CBS, are going to be good for the Apple TV. It may be a hobby, but it plays well with their overall strategy.
post #28 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by esummers View Post

I'm not sure if the living room will exist for decades to come... Kinda like the dining room is disappearing now (merging to the living room)... Soon it will just be "the room" because there will be no focus and everyone will use their iPad or iGoggles or whatever new convergent device is out.

My living/dining room is kind of like that, the only boundary is the edge of carpet to wood floor. For a long time, first time visitors thought there wasn't even a TV. There is a ceiling mounted projector that seems to hide in plain sight, you don't see a screen if it's off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistergsf View Post

But Apple doesn't seem to want to do or try anything new to the Apple TV to make it a more compelling product. How can they grow the market and make it worthwhile when ATV has stayed basically the same aside from a few software updates? What, exactly, is holding them back? If Mr. Cook wants some ideas, I've got a long list of ideas.

I really don't get it either. The Apple of a few years ago probably would have just dumped the product. At the very least, it seems they could offer a streaming video plan, partner with Netflix, Hulu or do their own system. Hardware-wise, they could drop an A4 or a successor in there, offer one without a hard drive and sell it for less. They keep saying that below $200 is their hottest price point that gets people buying their iPods, why not do the same for AppleTV? A4 should cost less per unit than a discrete intel CPU, support chipset & nvidia GPU.
post #29 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Yes I think the "Hobby" refrain coming from Apple is a bit silly. An unenthused Apple isn't going to deliver great products and if they cannot deliver great products then they need to open up iTunes so that purchases play nicely on other hardware boxen.

The movie industry was adamant that Apple not get the type of control they have with music distribution and they do have more options because Apple never delivered the magic bullet in the Apple TV as compared to the iPod Magic Bullet.

Apple has to swim upstream just like everyone else.

The problem isn't that Apple TV isn't a good product or that iTunes content isn't playable on other companies devices. The problem is that iTunes content isn't good enough to replace cable. No online solution is and the content providers want to keep it that way. Cable brings them a lot of money and they don't want to risk that revenue stream by making online content too attractive.

What Apple needs for Apple TV is a distribution deal that will allow iTunes to provide a better service than cable currently does. Once they have that, Apple TV becomes very attractive as is. You would buy Apple TV just like you buy a digital cable box now. To get that deal though, Apple has keep Apple TV low profile. Content providers are attached to cable, but they are also greedy. If Apple can convince them that a better iTunes deal will bring them more customers outside of the living room they might go for it. That is precisely why Apple is using the iPad to negotiate 99 cent episodes instead of an improved Apple TV. Once Apple gets the deal they need, they can bring out the new and improved Apple TV and make their push into the living room.

Decoupling internet service providers and television content providers is probably one of the toughest things to do, but that is exactly what we need to happen if we ever want truly great online content distribution, be it from iTunes, Hulu, Netflix or something else. Making Apple TV better than it is now is trivial when compared to getting a content deal that is competitive with cable.
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post #30 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Curious how Apple seem almost completely uninterested in the living room. Microsoft, Sony, Netflix, and others will own it for decades to come.

I don't think people spend that much time in the living room. I think Apple would hit the Auto Industry before taking over living room.
Apple TV is very hard to achieve as the Broadcasting industry is being so hard to crack.
Plus people can play iPhone and iPad in the living room, so its not all that bad.
Apple had me at scrolling
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post #31 of 150
I think Mac Mini is due for a Core i5/i7 update
post #32 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

The problem isn't that Apple TV isn't a good product or that iTunes content isn't playable on other companies devices. The problem is that iTunes content isn't good enough to replace cable. No online solution is and the content providers want to keep it that way. Cable brings them a lot of money and they don't want to risk that revenue stream by making online content too attractive.

What Apple needs for Apple TV is a distribution deal that will allow iTunes to provide a better service than cable currently does. Once they have that, Apple TV becomes very attractive as is. You would buy Apple TV just like you buy a digital cable box now. To get that deal though, Apple has keep Apple TV low profile. Content providers are attached to cable, but they are also greedy. If Apple can convince them that a better iTunes deal will bring them more customers outside of the living room they might go for it. That is precisely why Apple is using the iPad to negotiate 99 cent episodes instead of an improved Apple TV. Once Apple gets the deal they need, they can bring out the new and improved Apple TV and make their push into the living room.

Decoupling internet service providers and television content providers is probably one of the toughest things to do, but that is exactly what we need to happen if we ever want truly great online content distribution, be it from iTunes, Hulu, Netflix or something else. Making Apple TV better than it is now is trivial when compared to getting a content deal that is competitive with cable.

Holly crap! That is very well written!
post #33 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

I don't think people spend that much time in the living room. I think Apple would hit the Auto Industry before taking over living room.
Apple TV is very hard to achieve as the Broadcasting industry is being so hard to crack.
Plus people can play iPhone and iPad in the living room, so its not all that bad.

I would respectfully disagree about 'spending time in the living room!' TV and movies not to mention games take up a lot of time...

I enjoy watching movies on my AppleTV. I want to support Apple in 'cracking' the studios.

On a side note the only reason I have cable is so I can watch Formula one races in HD on SpeedTV.

I hate to say this but I'm very close to giving up on cable....and forgoing F1 this season....and only watch movies....Maybe I can bit.torrent HD F1 races...not sure though.

But the money I save by not having cable I could invest in a 27" iMac and a "n" Time capsule...up my internet speed to the max...Just saying!
post #34 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Wal-Mart just bought Vudu. Between Netflix, Wal-Mart, Hulu and a host of other options, Apple may need to get more serious about AppleTV soon or they will be pushed off the cliff by the movie industry and these other companies aligning against them.

And align against them is what they want to do. They have seen the music industry be squeezed by Apple and though I believe it is not a bad thing (someone had to do it) the movie industry and television companies are not exactly eager to jump into bed with Apple. Other avenues through Netflix, Hulu, and others may gain traction.

However I think the problem with the apple way to a movie company is why make a deal for content to apple only products? This is all the more true with television content. Why would a company want to siphon themselves off from the rest of the potential money to be made. I think these video media companies are trying to figure how they really want to do this and how are they going to maximize profit.
post #35 of 150
I'm happy with my Apple TV the way it is. I guess I'm not your average user but my biggest complaint is that there's no way (that I've found) to play an entire season of a TV show without pressing play after each episode finishes.
post #36 of 150
This is not exactly on topic, other than it being my prediction of how Apple's focus on simplicity will play out for "multi-tasking" (aka background Applications that weren't written by Apple).

In middle-to-late March, Apple will host an event demonstrating iPhone/iPad OS 4 — like many are predicting, it will include a dashboard-like feature. Developers will be able two write two types of dashboard widgets:
  • Standalone — simple widgets such as the weather widget that is on the Mac OS/X dashboard as well as the similar one on the current iPhone.
  • Application Widgets — These have a full application associated with them, but also have a widget that you can display quickly.

The "Application Widgets" will allow the user to run apps in the background. So, for example, Pandora could write a widget that is connected to their app that will keep playing music in the background and display a set of play/pause/skip controls along with the name of the song playing, etc. Apple's own iPod/Music app will have a dashboard widget for controlling it as well.

The user will probably determine which widgets to place "on the dashboard" in way that is similar to the Mac OS/X dashboard interface — they will press something and a set of available widget icons will appear at the bottom of the screen and they will be able to drag them onto the dashboard.

Anyway, my prediction... we'll see how I do in a month
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By the way, they will not demo the 4th generation iPhone in March, they will wait until April or May.
post #37 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by masstrkiller View Post

And align against them is what they want to do. They have seen the music industry be squeezed by Apple and though I believe it is not a bad thing (someone had to do it) the movie industry and television companies are not exactly eager to jump into bed with Apple. Other avenues through Netflix, Hulu, and others may gain traction.

However I think the problem with the apple way to a movie company is why make a deal for content to apple only products? This is all the more true with television content. Why would a company want to siphon themselves off from the rest of the potential money to be made. I think these video media companies are trying to figure how they really want to do this and how are they going to maximize profit.

I have one word for the movie industry....'Redbox' $1 video rental soon to be in every, grocery store, convenience store and gas station near you! F the movie/cable and TV industries!

Did you see the 3hr. NBC winter Olympics presentation Saturday night? Out of 3 hours 1.54 hrs. were commercials, 11 minutes were replays, 12 minutes were special interest stories and 17 minutes was watching Bill Costas 'talking' next to his on set fireplace! It's like eating at McDonald's- just crap!
post #38 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

I'm happy with my Apple TV the way it is. I guess I'm not your average user but my biggest complaint is that there's no way (that I've found) to play an entire season of a TV show without pressing play after each episode finishes.

Me too, Rich...there is a real convergence of not just movies but my photos, my music, my ripped DVD's and just before xmas AppleTV added internet radio, most without any commercials! all the stereo cables, stereo boxes, tuners, power plugs, attenna have been replaced by one HDMI cable and the AppleTV's elegant 'box!'
post #39 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The Mac OS is "amazingly scalable,"

Linux does the same.
American centrism dominates 50% of the population here. That half don't think outside the box ... or perhaps just don't think. © digitalclips
Reply
American centrism dominates 50% of the population here. That half don't think outside the box ... or perhaps just don't think. © digitalclips
Reply
post #40 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

Who wants to bet that they're developing a secret OS X that runs on ARM? I don't know much about ARM, but could it compete with an i7 as far as GHz or scalability?

Does no one here read for content anymore?
Quote:
It must suck to be a developer not knowing when Apple will switch processor platforms. I know if I was M$ or Adobe, I'd hate to rewrite everything again to support a new instruction set.

Apple isn't about to switch platforms on the desktop or even the notebooks. The differences in capability are massive here.

Dave
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