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Intuit intros long-awaited Quicken overhaul for Mac

post #1 of 94
Thread Starter 
After numerous delays, Quicken's long-awaited money management software built specifically for the Mac arrived Thursday in the form of Quicken Essentials for Mac 2010.

Quicken Essentials for Mac is a brand new product developed in Cocoa to optimize the Mac look and feel. It connects twice the number of banks available in the previous offering, Quicken Mac 2007, increasing from 4,000 to 8,000. The company expects to have access to 16,000 banks in the coming months.

"Quicken Essentials for Mac is the first Quicken product to take full advantage of the Mac operating system and development platform," said Aaron Patzer, vice president and general manager of Intuits Personal Finance Group. "Were bringing a completely new Quicken experience to Mac users, helping them answer essential money questions what do I spend, what do I earn, where do I stand on my budgets, what is my net worth, and where can I do better?"

Quicken developer Intuit said the new product earned its name because it offers the "essentials" for the majority of people: How much money you have, how much you owe, all your liabilities and investments, and all of your budgeting.

Quicken Essentials for Mac also sports easier categorization with a new learning algorithm, and also allows conversion for previous Quicken users on both Windows and Mac, as well as users of Microsoft Money.

Advertised features of the new software include:

View your accounts all in one place. Our completely reimagined interface makes it easier than ever to see where you can save more and spend less.
Save time and money. Quicken automatically categorizes transactions so you can see where your moneys going and pay down debt.
Avoid pesky overdraft and late fees. See your current balance, including upcoming bills and paychecks so you always know where you stand.


The new product does drop some features found in the previous version, Quicken Mac 2007, which Intuit said it will continue to support for those that rely on those capabilities. Quicken Essentials for Mac has a "light" investment feature, with a view only version that doesn't have tax lot accounting. It also doesn't do bill pay -- which Intuit said only 6 percent of people used -- and there is no direct integration with TurboTax.



AppleInsider first previewed the Quicken overhaul more than two years ago, in January 2008, when it was then known as "Quicken Financial Life for Mac."







Quicken Essentials for Mac 2010 is available for $69.99 from Intuit. It is available as a direct download, or via CD-ROM.
post #2 of 94
I like the clouds.
post #3 of 94
Now all I want is pocket quicken to come to the iphone OS
turtles all the way up and turtles all the way down... infinite context means infinite possibility
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post #4 of 94
$70 for a crippled version that does not have any features and does not integrate with your tax software is a rip off. Maybe for 29 dollars I would think about it. Apple needs to release iTax and iSave and make these things work. Ah who am I kidding I will have to use windows for all of my financial needs forever.
--SHEFFmachine out
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #5 of 94
So without bill pay, investment management, or TurboTax integration, Quicken for Mac is now basically Mint.com but you have to pay about $70 for the privilege of using it offline instead of using the free online version.

Guess that Mint.com investment Intuit made will pay off.
post #6 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

Now all I want is pocket quicken to come to the iphone OS

Don't bother waiting. If this is the direction Quicken for Mac is taking, then you might as well just use the free Mint.com app.
post #7 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

$70 for a crippled version that does not have any features and does not integrate with your tax software is a rip off. Maybe for 29 dollars I would think about it. Apple needs to release iTax and iSave and make these things work. Ah who am I kidding I will have to use windows for all of my financial needs forever.

You beat me to it. But $29 is still too expensive. $0 is more like it.
post #8 of 94
$70 is way too much for a neutered application. Without bill pay, Turbo Tax compatibility*, file format compatibility with the Windows version, and investment portfolio support, this should be priced at $20, maybe $30 at the outside.

Note to Intuit: We want feature parity, not half a product.

*Quicken and TurboTax are both Intuit products, aren't they?

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post #9 of 94
Nice first baby step towards full feature parity with Quicken Windows, I hope.
post #10 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

Now all I want is pocket quicken to come to the iphone OS

I can't believe they have made no move after 3 years of the iPhone. Maybe they will now that iPad is coming around and will create a larger base.

I pretty much track my money with SplashMoney on the iPhone and use Quicken to download historical data. The iPhone version is good, but I'd tell everyone to avoid the desktop version like a fatal disease, which IT IS to your data. Still, doing it all (get e-bills, pay & record) on the iPhone is fan-friggin-tastic.
post #11 of 94
I used to think I HAD to have Quicken to manage the modest needs of my two small businesses. However, I discovered Moneywell a year ago and until then didn't realize how pleasant a financial app could be to use. Everything in one pane, intuitive and prints out the tax summaries my accountant needs. No need for Intuit's "in the market-outof the market" behavior anymore.

I'd pay twice the cost of Quicken for Moneywell, but actually Moneywell is less expensive as well.
post #12 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

Nice first baby step towards full feature parity with Quicken Windows, I hope.

You might be interested in the following

In the on-air discussion, Patzer said Intuit plans to keep selling desktop versions of Quicken for Windows PCs and Apple (AAPL) Macs for perhaps five years further.


Intuit released this crippled version of Quicken for the Mac because Intuit does not plan to continue with Quicken for the desktops. The product will be phased out in favor of online mint.com. Do you think it is a coincidence that the CEO of mint.com is now in charge of all Quicken products?
post #13 of 94
I want to use mint.com but is it really safe? Giving out my bank account information is like asking a stranger to take something out of my eye... that's just me, but maybe I'm overreacting.
post #14 of 94
I honestly can't imagine living on Mint.com or similar. I have over 23 years of data in Quicken at my "fingertips". Maybe I don't really need it, but I've used the ability search for a purchase years ago frequently.

I hate that I have to have VMWare Fusion on my Macs to run Quicken Windows, but even before this obvious severe castrating of the Mac version, Quicken for Mac was a joke if you had business and investment data to track.

I looked at iBank on the Mac, but too much hassle to import data over. I guess Intuit's forcing us to find a way out of their proprietary data format eventually.

The fact that Intuit owns Mint.com now is probably a good indicator that Mint.com is on its way out too. I have Mint.com, but it's just no replacement for my desktop Quicken.
post #15 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilogic View Post

I want to use mint.com but is it really safe? Giving out my bank account information is like asking a stranger to take something out of my eye... that's just me, but maybe I'm overreacting.

I think you're overreacting. My understanding is that Mint doesn't actually get your password data, it's passed on to some password broker that all the banks already use to store you login credentials. Do a little Google searching for a clearer picture, but I'm pretty sure no one's had their financial data compromised just by the act of registering acccounts with Mint.
post #16 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by philu View Post

Don't bother waiting. If this is the direction Quicken for Mac is taking, then you might as well just use the free Mint.com app.


Intiut bought Mint.com. Also, there is already a free Quicken app for the iPhone that is basically the same as Mint's app. It even supports more banks than Mint does (none of the banks I use are supported by Mint).
post #17 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

*Quicken and TurboTax are both Intuit products, aren't they?

Yes they are.
post #18 of 94
I almost think Intuit is worse than Autodesk when it comes to supporting the Mac. We were looking at Quickbooks Enterprise for the office, but with no Mac support we will just stick with our existing crap.

Moving your finances online seems pretty dumb in my book. Talk about an identity thief's treasure trove! Anybody tried gnuCash as a QB alternative recently?
post #19 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebaker355 View Post

Too little, too late. Intuit has never been serious about a financial app for the Apple platform. Go with iBank instead - works with many banks online and has a great iphone app (for $5).

Say what? Maybe not Quicken but Turbo tax for Mac rocks. Isn't that a financial application?
post #20 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

I honestly can't imagine living on Mint.com or similar. I have over 23 years of data in Quicken at my "fingertips". Maybe I don't really need it, but I've used the ability search for a purchase years ago frequently.

I hate that I have to have VMWare Fusion on my Macs to run Quicken Windows, but even before this obvious severe castrating of the Mac version, Quicken for Mac was a joke if you had business and investment data to track.

Totally in agreement with you. I can't believe that after waiting for //years// for a decent Mac equivalent of Quicken for Windows, this is the best they could do. I've been using Quicken since version 4 or 5 for DOS, and was looking forward to finally getting a powerful, native version that would run on my Mac, rather than having to rely upon VM Fusion, etc. That looks like it's never gonna happen.
post #21 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

I honestly can't imagine living on Mint.com or similar. I have over 23 years of data in Quicken at my "fingertips". Maybe I don't really need it, but I've used the ability search for a purchase years ago frequently.

I hate that I have to have VMWare Fusion on my Macs to run Quicken Windows, but even before this obvious severe castrating of the Mac version, Quicken for Mac was a joke if you had business and investment data to track.

I looked at iBank on the Mac, but too much hassle to import data over. I guess Intuit's forcing us to find a way out of their proprietary data format eventually.

The fact that Intuit owns Mint.com now is probably a good indicator that Mint.com is on its way out too. I have Mint.com, but it's just no replacement for my desktop Quicken.

I'm in the same boat, and share your frustration. I have been looking forward to a powerful native version of Quicken for Mac for years, but I guess that's never gonna happen. (Sigh).
post #22 of 94
I am using budget software from YouNeedABudget.com that meets my needs better. YNAB--unlike what I saw in the Quicken screenshots--focuses on monthly budgeting rather than mere transaction tracking. One of the basic ideas in YNAB is to use last month's income for this month's expenses to avoid living from paycheck to paycheck. I realize that's not going to work for everyone, but I like it.

Someone above mentioned Moneywell. That looks interesting, too. Do the amounts in the budget "buckets" roll forward from month to month?
post #23 of 94
I was intrigued until I reached the $70 part. iBank costs a good deal less and for that I can put up with its quirks. Moneywell is another one that looks interesting, but this Quicken looks like a damp squib, and an expensive one at that.
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post #24 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

I think you're overreacting. My understanding is that Mint doesn't actually get your password data, it's passed on to some password broker that all the banks already use to store you login credentials. Do a little Google searching for a clearer picture, but I'm pretty sure no one's had their financial data compromised just by the act of registering acccounts with Mint.

I also heard that AMEX is giving its account members a mint.com type of functionality that allows you to register accounts and such.

I have a question with Mint. I have everything setup through my online banking, CC transfers, bill payees, etc. Does Mint know how to break down these transactions, or will it just present you with the statement view of all transactions which you then have to manually categorize?

I guess I should google it more...
post #25 of 94
I have to wonder why they bothered. Once again it's missing features from the Windows version. Even Microsoft took 10 years to learn that while Office looks Mac-like, it's missing features cripple the software compared to the Windows version.
post #26 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Note to Intuit: We want feature parity, not half a product.


Quit whining. You knew that there was little software available when you bought a Mac!

Do we hate Intuit now, like we hate Adobe?
post #27 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by philu View Post

Don't bother waiting. If this is the direction Quicken for Mac is taking, then you might as well just use the free Mint.com app.

I would love to use mint.com, but they don't support my bank so I can't use it. So my only choice is to use something like Quicken which can import the OFX file the bank creates.
post #28 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by philu View Post

So without bill pay, investment management, or TurboTax integration, Quicken for Mac is now basically Mint.com but you have to pay about $70 for the privilege of using it offline instead of using the free online version. Guess that Mint.com investment Intuit made will pay off.

Inuit says that only 6% pay bills through Quicken, but that sounds fishy. It can't be. I've been paying bills electronically with financial software, first Managing Your Money and then Quicken, for almost 20 years. To me that's a core feature, not a bell or whistle that people don't really use.

As you said, without bill pay, investment management and tax integration, the application is worth very little.
post #29 of 94
I was a quicken user for a long long Time- I went to a PC and was using Parallells- I looked at every product and was waiting for the quicken for mac to come out. When I heard it was not going to have bill pay I gave up on it.

So I went to www.yodlee.com

They run the back end of MINT and many other big banks.
So far so goo.
post #30 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Quit whining. You knew that there was little software available when you bought a Mac!

Do we hate Intuit now, like we hate Adobe?

True dat- but that's why we use bootcamp and parallels.
post #31 of 94
Very light investment information and no integration with Turbo Tax? You are kidding, right? No thank you.
post #32 of 94
Over priced - under powered. The lack of Turbo Tax integration, poor reporting and minimal investment tracking are show stoppers for me. Intuit continues to drop the ball for Mac users.
post #33 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebaker355 View Post

Too little, too late. Intuit has never been serious about a financial app for the Apple platform. Go with iBank instead - works with many banks online and has a great iphone app (for $5).

What I can't understand is why the former CEO of Intuit is on Apple's board, given the lackluster Mac support the company has historically provided. Can't he pull a little weight?

http://about.intuit.com/about_intuit...l_campbell.jsp
post #34 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebaker355 View Post

Too little, too late. Intuit has never been serious about a financial app for the Apple platform. Go with iBank instead - works with many banks online and has a great iphone app (for $5).

Intuit is leaving the PPC in the dust. Essentials is an Intel only application.
I have tried Moneydance and Moneywell, but I keep going back to iBank.
I had too much trouble balancing my checkbook with Moneywell and
did not like the way Moneydance works.
post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Quit whining. You knew that there was little software available when you bought a Mac!

Do we hate Intuit now, like we hate Adobe?

Not as much as we hate a certain someone......
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Where a calculator on the ENIAC is equpped with 18,000 vaccuum tubes and weighs 30 tons, computers in the future may have only 1,000 vaccuum tubes and perhaps weigh 1.5 tons.
by Popular Mechanics
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post #36 of 94
Yes...very strange "update". I WILL NOT be spending $70.00 for what really is a large step backwards for Intuit (Mint) Quicken. I agree, this is a paid version of mint.com. Hopefully Intuit will read these, sell very few copies, and completely re-write the program. For now, I am staying with 2007 version. They blew it!!
post #37 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

The fact that Intuit owns Mint.com now is probably a good indicator that Mint.com is on its way out too. I have Mint.com, but it's just no replacement for my desktop Quicken.

Actually its the opposite. Intuit now point you towards mint.com instead of their own QuickenOnline, so I think their plan is to move to mint.com, and probably phase out QuickenOnline.
post #38 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyDax View Post

I like the clouds.

Cloud Financing... One day you have a solid investment/retirement portfolio then POOF, the next day you don't...

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #39 of 94
Looks like I'll be sticking with Quicken 2004 - at least until the G5 iMac holds out anyway.

Agree that this software is way too expensive for the features. Plus it only took them forever to come up with this. Been promising a Mac version forever.
post #40 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

Quit whining. You knew that there was little software available when you bought a Mac!

Do we hate Intuit now, like we hate Adobe?

You don't even own a Mac. Quit pretending like you have a stake in this...

For anyone else, Quicken for Mac *used* to have those features in previous versions.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
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