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iPod touch users spend more time using apps than those with iPhones

post #1 of 65
Thread Starter 
A new survey of mobile device consumers has discovered that iPhone and iPod touch owners are mostly male, though iPhone users are older and have less time to use downloaded applications than those who have an iPod touch.

AdMob's Mobile Metrics report for January 2010 found that iPod touch users download an average of 12 applications per month, which is 37 percent more than iPhone and Android users. Those with an iPod touch also spend 100 minutes per day using applications, which is 25 percent more than both Android and the iPhone.

iPod touch users are also considerably younger, with 78 percent of them below the age of 25. Compare that with the iPhone, where 25 percent of users are under 25, and 24 percent for those on Android and WebOS.

But iPhone users are by far the most likely to purchase software for their handset, with half of them spending money on at least one application every month. Of those with an iPod touch, 35 percent bought at least one application each month, followed by 24 percent of WebOS users and 21 percent of Android users.

And satisfaction among iPhone users ranked highest, with 91 percent saying they would recommend their device. That was followed closely by the iPod touch, which had an 88 percent recommendation rate. Android users are relatively happy too, with 84 percent saying they would recommend their handset. Palm's WebOS came in last with 69 percent.



It's yet another in a number of surveys that show users are overwhelmingly satisfied with the iPhone hardware. Other surveys have found Android just behind Apple in terms of happiness with their device.

Customer satisfaction with the iPhone OS carries over to anticipation for the forthcoming iPad. Among iPhone owners surveyed, 16 percent said they intend to purchase an iPad. Comparatively, 11 percent of WebOS users and 6 percent of Android customers said they would purchase the first-generation Apple device.



Those numbers generally correspond with a separate survey released earlier this week, which found that 13 percent of respondents are likely to buy an iPad. That number was larger than the 9 percent who said they intended to purchase an iPhone before its debut in 2007.

In the battle of the sexes, AdMob's survey found Android users are overwhelmingly male, at 73 percent of the user base. Comparatively, 58 percent of WebOS users, 57 percent of iPhone users and 54 percent of iPod touch users are male.



The opt-in survey was taken by users on their respective mobile devices by responding to mobile advertisements. The findings were based on 963 total respondents, with 318 Android users, 244 iPhone, 356 iPod touch and 45 WebOS responding between Feb. 5 and Feb. 16.
post #2 of 65
That's because we're too bust reconnecting all our dropped calls. I must have had 3 last night.

But seriously , we use our iPhones as what they are-mobile phones ,so no comparison. We text, make calls, use email.
Most of Apple's apps are toys anyway. That is another reason many of us are dissapointed in the new MaxiTouch. The percentage of really useful apps must be small from what I've seen. Most are childish widgets. Is there a survey out there?
post #3 of 65
This data is not surprising given the fact that the iPod Touch (and to a lessor effect the iPhone) is mostly used for games.

As a adult with mature needs, I have been unable to find enough apps of a quality nature to justify purchasing either device.

I rather have the few apps I did find useful as paid options in dashboard on my MacBook Pro.


With Apple trending towards making the iPhone UI and App Store a future part of touchscreen Mac's, I feel a great sense of uncertainty about my future computing needs with Apple's hardware.
post #4 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


The opt-in survey was ...

...deemed worthless because of the self-selected nature of the respondents.
post #5 of 65
If AT&T would drop the requirement for having a data plan with the iPhone, lots of those Teenager iPod touch users would get iPhones. Right now they all have two devices (iPod and a Cell phone), because their parents won't pay for the data plan.

I know many of you can't see why ANYONE would have an iPhone w/o a data plan, but if the alternative was to have an iPod touch and a separate cell phone, wouldn't an iPhone w/o a data plan be a better solution?
post #6 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

That's because we're too bust reconnecting all our dropped calls. I must have had 3 last night.

But seriously , we use our iPhones as what they are-mobile phones ,so no comparison. We text, make calls, use email.
Most of Apple's apps are toys anyway. That is another reason many of us are dissapointed in the new MaxiTouch. The percentage of really useful apps must be small from what I've seen. Most are childish widgets. Is there a survey out there?

We have a touch in the kitchen plugged into a Tivoli radio. It's great for listening to This American Life or twit.tv. Or looking up the weather or sending a quick email.

Clearly sales prove there's plenty of use for a touch and most likely the iPad form factor as well.
post #7 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post

With Apple trending towards making the iPhone UI and App Store a future part of touchscreen Mac's, I feel a great sense of uncertainty about my future computing needs with Apple's hardware.

I find it notable that Apple now stresses that they are a mobile devices company. I take this as a clear indication that the desktop will be going onto the back burner.

Especially now that Apple is having a tawdry public feud with Adobe, who used to drive Mac Desktop sales, but now seem unlikely to want to help Apple sell high-priced hardware.
post #8 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Among iPhone owners surveyed, 16 percent said they intend to purchase an iPad. Comparatively, 11 percent of WebOS users and 6 percent of Android customers said they would purchase the first-generation Apple device.

ze-ze-ze-ze-ze... no-no-no-no.

Please tell us how many iPod Touch owners are gonna buy iPad. That's what we call honest journalism and blogging.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #9 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by walshbj View Post

We have a touch in the kitchen plugged into a Tivoli radio. It's great for listening to This American Life or twit.tv. Or looking up the weather or sending a quick email.

Clearly sales prove there's plenty of use for a touch and most likely the iPad form factor as well.

That's sound cool. I'm actually looking for something similar for my kitchen. Amazon had a bluetooth Altec Lansing speaker for nothing yesterday. Does the Tivoli charge the iPod/Phone?
post #10 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by aross99 View Post

If AT&T would drop the requirement for having a data plan with the iPhone, lots of those Teenager iPod touch users would get iPhones. Right now they all have two devices (iPod and a Cell phone), because their parents won't pay for the data plan.

I know many of you can't see why ANYONE would have an iPhone w/o a data plan, but if the alternative was to have an iPod touch and a separate cell phone, wouldn't an iPhone w/o a data plan be a better solution?


Parents buy things for their kids knowing it's going to be lost, loaned, stolen or destroyed, so they certainly are less likely to consider a costly $80-$100 a month for 2 years contract and a $600 iPhone when they could opt for a less costly iPod Touch and a cheap $30, pay as you go cell phone or pre pay monthly plan.

To get more iPod Touch users to be iPhone users, thus not having to lug around two devices, the iPhone will have to have slimmed down in features versions and a monthly plan. Also the kids won't be able to loan their iPhones out to friends to game with, which parents might actually be pleased with.

The multiple versions of the iPod have worked very well for Apple, I fail to understand why they didn't do the same with the iPhone.

People have different needs, thus need different devices and plans.
post #11 of 65
I'm glad to see the competition shaping up. Pleasantly surprised to see WebOS doing well in their survey. I'll have to give their new SDK a go round. The original one using Virtual Box was such crap.


Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

I find it notable that Apple now stresses that they are a mobile devices company. I take this as a clear indication that the desktop will be going onto the back burner.

Because a company worth $180B can't possibly keep making billions a year on Macs. Note that part of their claim for being the largest mobile device company included Mac notebooks.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #12 of 65
I love how some people open their mouths without reading the article.

Anyway, this is no surprised since the iPod Touch is more likely to be used by younger people, like the survey found, with more spare time and limited budget. I can't remember the last time I actually bought paid app. I usually look for a specific app that do a specific function. Then I do my research online to find the best app before paying for it. On the other hand, I download at least 3 free games for my son on his iPod Touch.

Quote:
Customer satisfaction with the iPhone OS carries over to anticipation for the forthcoming iPad. Among iPhone owners surveyed, 16 percent said they intend to purchase an iPad. Comparatively, 11 percent of WebOS users and 6 percent of Android customers said they would purchase the first-generation Apple device.

It is interesting to see if we will actually see a reverse situation when the iPad is released. For example, how may iPad users who never owned an iPhone will buy one because of the iPad. Hopefully we will know in few months
post #13 of 65
You use the iTouch for internet, a remote, games, or even first aid. When doing this -- you are using an application. What else is there to do with an iTouch -- use Skype?

I don't understand some comments about "the iTouch being a toy and not useful for adults" -- then you aren't looking. There are serious medical apps, science and conversion tools, and you can attach almost any sensor you can think of to the USB port -- you just have to look around.

It's an amazing golden age where developers are making things for FREE and giving you value, and it doesn't even include Spyware.

And what is wrong with games? I've got a Nintendo DS, and the Free games on the iTouch are better than half the games I pay $15 for. Some games have depth -- some don't. But the problem with development for Games Only platforms is you don't get the free novelties that little kids can pick up -- they usually have a lot of annoying "repeatedly do pointless task" to add "value" to justify the cost. The iTouch/iPod seem like a better playground, where developers and hobbyists can just try out cool things and nobody gets hurt.

Besides the games -- I've never had a more useful device in my life that keeps working and gets more valuable the longer I have it. I have maybe the first or second edition iTouch -- and I've only gotten one or two things that didn't work and I've filled out all 11 panels a few times over, and the first 4 are ALL interesting and useful NON-GAME apps. I've had to prune things down and decide between 3 social media apps, a Wikipedia development environment, an SSH terminal over wireless, an advanced scientific calculator, my drink mixing apps, recipes -- I cannot go through the list. There is just something really useful about having something in your hand that doesn't require you to print it out and you can set it beside your blender in the Kitchen.

When I have 5 minutes to waste -- I pull it out, and I've got something interesting to read stashed along to a podcast on physics, development or whatever.

Sure, you can have conversations and look at trees -- but if you are geeking out or want entertainment -- there is nothing better.

>> But did we need this survey to tell us people use apps more? No. That's all you use -- which, you know, means everything you do with a computer. They might need a survey to see how much typing people do on either device, or web-surfing. But I think we are looking at these things with a microscope too much: They are the future, and everything else will follow the iPhone platform regardless of the moronic PR-Pundits who have to please an advertiser -- we get it.
post #14 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post

With Apple trending towards making the iPhone UI and App Store a future part of touchscreen Mac's, I feel a great sense of uncertainty about my future computing needs with Apple's hardware.

There is a touchscreen Mac by Apple?!

If your statement was true then we would have seen a full Mac OS X on the iPad instead of the iPhone OS. I see the exact opposite. I think Apple made it clear that Mac OS and iPhone OS will not share UI since each serves different purpose and function.

However, if you mean that "future touch screen Macs" will gain multitouch capabilities then I don't know how this can be bad.
post #15 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

That's sound cool. I'm actually looking for something similar for my kitchen. Amazon had a bluetooth Altec Lansing speaker for nothing yesterday. Does the Tivoli charge the iPod/Phone?

It's a great radio, but the downside is the switch has AM-FM-OFF. No aux. So you have to unplug the 3.5mm to listen to the radio. When it's plugged in you're on the iPod/iPhone. Not a dock device.

Still, it's a nice size, has a built in rechargeable battery with nice life, and pleasant radio sound. Sometimes a stereo is too much. It's often plugged into my Airport Express. It's great with AirFoil.

http://www.amazon.com/Tivoli-Audio-P.../dp/B0002HA7OK
post #16 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'm glad to see the competition shaping up. Pleasantly surprised to see WebOS doing well in their survey. I'll have to give their new SDK a go round. The original one using Virtual Box was such crap.


Because a company worth $180B can't possibly keep making billions a year on Macs. Note that part of their claim for being the largest mobile device company included Mac notebooks.

When iTunes first opened, it was a LOSS-LEADER for a while. It wasn't to drive other people out of the market -- it was to CREATE a market. It's finally in the black and there are still people complaining about a 30% haircut by Apple -- when they are perfectly free to do their own marketing, get their own servers and sell applications, good luck on only spending 30% doing that or getting that deal with the Labels -- or with Amazon.com for a book (though they've gotten more competitive since the Kindle has competition now).


The point is; I think Apple understands that they STILL need a foothold in the Desktop. . The iTouch was created FOR the Halo effect of getting kids and people not ready to spend $30 extra a month on a data contract for a cell phone. The VALUE of Apple, is to have your content and creativity enabling be ubiquitous.

Right now, I think the BIG holdup on Apple's updates to the desktop and laptops is INTEL's battle for supremacy and abusing its monopoly positions. Apple has to play nice with them and not anger the giant -- but it can't wait forever and NOT put in NVidia graphics cards because INTEL doesn't want to let them be compatible with their latest CHIPs. INTEL wants to own the low-power portable market and the Graphics GPU market. If NVIDIA is gone, you've only got ATI/AMD in the battle. It will be like Coke and Pepsi -- do you see anything on the shelves? Real advancements will stagnate as spending money on R&D is a cost you don't need when people HAVE to buy an INTEL chip with an INTEL GPU to get the best performance/compatibility. Eventually, some company in China will come up out of the blue and steal this market from us, but until then it will be higher prices.

So the LACK of updates on the Desktop/Laptop has to do with a lack of real competition -- and Apple is still innovating and one of the few PC makers around with enough money and savvy to keep the competition alive.

The $1 Billion dollar investment in their own ARM-based processor, as well as giving them a competitive advantage in touch-screen devices, is also an important strategic hedge against ATOM processors -- so that Apple is not dependent like they were with the Power PC consortium when their partners like Motorola and IBM could care less about the next Mac desktop computer. IBM cared about servers and Motorola cared about keeping their head up their rear and being third place in low voltage chips while they gave up their technical lead against the X86 PC platform.

The only saving grace in the Desktop, is that things are FAST ENOUGH for most people. The only thing demanding enough to make users crave more power is 3D, HD Video, and Games --- a small but important segment as far as mindshare. The same group who pans the iPad because it doesn't have features they ignored in other keyboard-less computers.

Hopefully, Apple will be forced to be OPEN one day on the iTunes platform with competition -- right now, however, if I were the Government, I'd let them have their monopolies because it's necessary to create NEW MARKETS. The PRINT industry, is going to continue getting rid of content creators and reporters until they bridge the gap to micro-payments and digital delivery -- at least they know it like the Music Industry does not. They'd prefer their own walled gardens but all of them know that it's going to be through something like iTunes -- or it's going to be through Google where most readers get enough from the summaries and they don't even get a share of ad revenue.

So no money, or make Apple the publishing king and afford to keep your company going.

>> Anyway, everything is connected to everything -- and Apple will not be giving up their Desktop business, or their Laptop business even if they make many more dollars on iPads -- because they are big enough now, and they know their value is NOT the super-cool gadget, but the Synergy of iTunes and ENABLING users. If I'm plugging in an iphone to a PC -- I don't get that real Apple experience.
post #17 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post

This data is not surprising given the fact that the iPod Touch (and to a lessor effect the iPhone) is mostly used for games.

As a adult with mature needs, I have been unable to find enough apps of a quality nature to justify purchasing either device.

I rather have the few apps I did find useful as paid options in dashboard on my MacBook Pro.


With Apple trending towards making the iPhone UI and App Store a future part of touchscreen Mac's, I feel a great sense of uncertainty about my future computing needs with Apple's hardware.


I totally disagree. I like to think I am an adult being 50+ and I use lots of apps that are not games.
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
post #18 of 65
Interesting! It made me look at my 3Gs...I know this is anecdotal...but I see, 1. I haven't DL'd that many and 2. the ones I have DL'd most lean towards productivity and not games, In fact no games:

Paid Apps:
Pocket Universe: MacWorld recommendation.
RedLaser: UPC scanner app recommended by my daughter.
TuneIn Radio: to listen to NPR live.
RowMote: To turn my 1st gen iPhone into a universal remote...(have yet to setup though)

Free Apps:
DropBox: File access, brilliant, btw
Nike+: Running. Excellent
Chase: Banking.
MobileMe Gallery: Access MobileMe
Skype: texting daughter who is out of the country.
ATT MyWireless: Access Account.
AntiMosquito: Which works, btw
Redbox: Just to screw with the Movie Industry
InTuna: Guitar tuner

I'm thinking of getting TomTom, some sort of Golf App when start playing again and a business card scanner.
post #19 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new survey of mobile device consumers has discovered that iPhone and iPod touch owners are mostly male, ....

I think the most telling measure of the bunch is the gender gap on Android phones. Although there are exceptions, women don't generally like to tinker with their phones hardware or software and just want them to work as expected, when they are needed.

This survey seems to be saying that if you like Linux, and like tinkering with settings all day long, then Android is for you (and you are probably male).
post #20 of 65
Well, yes!

It's all about older generations' fascism!! Plain and simple!!

Those shameless daddy-os clearly see with all their experience iPod has considerably less value, than iPhone, and they chose to heartlessly hand it to young people! What an affront!!

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #21 of 65
I'm really letting the side down here. I don't download anywhere near the average amount of apps.

I download 2-3 apps a month. They're mostly non-free games that I've either been recommended by friends or that have received a good review in the printed media. I just don't have the time to go trawling through the app store. It's a shame as I'm sure that I'm missing out on some real gems.

On a related note, has anyone noticed how the indie devs are so much better at creating games for the iPhone? All of the big players try to adapt their existing IP to the iPhone and it simply doesn't work. Give me Flight Control and Field Runners over Street Fighter 4 and Metal Gear Solid any day of the week!
post #22 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I think the most telling measure of the bunch is the gender gap on Android phones. Although there are exceptions, women don't generally like to tinker with their phones hardware or software and just want them to work as expected, when they are needed.

This survey seems to be saying that if you like Linux, and like tinkering with settings all day long, then Android is for you (and you are probably male).

good point...kind of like Windows PC's and old cars that don't work...guys like to 'tinker' with them and women just want them to work.

My GF is very impressed with my iPhone but doesn't want one....where as my 24 year old daughter looks at her iPhone as an 'indispensable' part of her life!, Music, photos, text, email, phone calls, contacts, Apps, etc., etc.
post #23 of 65
Well of course the iPod touch is going to get more use out of apps. Us iPhone users depend on it for voice services, with 3rd party apps not a priority. Well, at least for me...
post #24 of 65
I have to agree, as an iPhone owner, AT&T's lack of functionality does cause you to spend time dealing with dropped calls. I have to say, though, amidst all the of games and fart apps in the App Store, there are plenty of functional and useful apps. I run a brand strategy firm, and can run my business from my iPhone. With access to Basecamp and Highrise, a to-do list with Things, Evernote for random items I don't want to forget, and ability to create a contract with Docs-to-Go, or "fax" a doc with scanner Pro or JotNot...I leave my MBP at home more and more. Of course, I'm sure that many of the posters above have real jobs and can't work on their cancer cure on the iPhone (or write code for another far app). I know many businesspeople that find their iPhone a critical tool (and most of them were Blackberry users).
post #25 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Those with an iPod touch also spend 100 minutes per day using applications

Could that number possibly be real?!

Fascinating data across the board. Although not terribly surprising that young people are using apps more. I see it as somewhat analogous to texting. Texting has its uses as does every form of communication. The same is true for pocket computer app use.

The distinction seems to be that older people tend to focus more on productive purposes while younger people tend toward both entertainment and productivity. Certainly this is just a generalization and use isn't a black or white situation between entertainment and productivity. But it does seem to ring true.

If looking to communicate, texting is invaluable in many scenarios. But it can also be a productivity sapper if used in scenarios where it isn't optimal. When people's time becomes more constrained, as tends to happen with career, family, and economic responsibilities, they reevaluate how they're spending time. While texting does maintain a relationship of sort with the recipient of the text, it isn't as quality of a relationship as fostered by phone calls or face-to-face time. In otherwords, texting is like junk food for relationship hunger. Quick and easy but not terribly rewarding.

The same is true for app use. Tiny pocket computers are great for their mobility but absolutely horrible for most productivity tasks. The screen size and lack of good input hardware is only tolerable because of what it makes possible while away from a full-blown computer. While I technically can do my company expense reporting on my iPhone, it would take 20 or 30 times as long as would sitting down with a real keyboard and mouse. The same is true for composing email, or reading business documents. It is great to have that capability while mobile, but if used when a real computer is otherwise available, that would be a colossal waste of time.

This isn't to say that younger usage is inferior. The age groups are just different in regard to the underlying cost/benefit tradeoff of texting or app usage.
post #26 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

Well of course the iPod touch is going to get more use out of apps. Us iPhone users depend on it for voice services, with 3rd party apps not a priority. Well, at least for me...

While reading the article that was my first thought.

I have a 3Gs, am 50, run own business and estimate my usage to be 50% phone calls, 25% email/internet access, 25% texting and all the rest!

But that second 50% keeps me really happy because of the advantage of having all of it in one device in my pocket! All for about $3/day!
post #27 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by aross99 View Post

If AT&T would drop the requirement for having a data plan with the iPhone, lots of those Teenager iPod touch users would get iPhones. Right now they all have two devices (iPod and a Cell phone), because their parents won't pay for the data plan.

Doubtful. Teenagers have iPods because they are irresponsible when it comes to cell phones (and even iPods!). They are constantly losing them, breaking them, or allowing them to get stolen. Parents are not going to spend the money on an iPhone when they can get a cheap free phone through the carrier.

Dumb survey. Adults have iPhones. Kids have iPods. Adults are more busy than kids. Adults don't have time to play with apps on their iPhones like teens do.
post #28 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Interesting! It made me look at my 3Gs...I know this is anecdotal...but I see, 1. I haven't DL'd that many and 2. the ones I have DL'd most lean towards productivity and not games, In fact no games:

Paid Apps:
Pocket Universe: MacWorld recommendation.
RedLaser: UPC scanner app recommended by my daughter.
TuneIn Radio: to listen to NPR live.
RowMote: To turn my 1st gen iPhone into a universal remote...(have yet to setup though)

Free Apps:
DropBox: File access, brilliant, btw
Nike+: Running. Excellent
Chase: Banking.
MobileMe Gallery: Access MobileMe
Skype: texting daughter who is out of the country.
ATT MyWireless: Access Account.
AntiMosquito: Which works, btw
Redbox: Just to screw with the Movie Industry
InTuna: Guitar tuner

I'm thinking of getting TomTom, some sort of Golf App when start playing again and a business card scanner.

I'll have to try the antimosquito- I get bit all night in summer cause the neighbor has a pond.
post #29 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I totally disagree. I like to think I am an adult being 50+ and I use lots of apps that are not games.


Perhaps you can help direct me to a way that I can find the top 100+ best useful apps the App Store offers without the chore of reading each description and misleading name?

By going by the "most sold" all it turns up is games, porn and crap.

thanks
post #30 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

That's because we're too bust reconnecting all our dropped calls. I must have had 3 last night.

But seriously , we use our iPhones as what they are-mobile phones ,so no comparison. We text, make calls, use email.
Most of Apple's apps are toys anyway. That is another reason many of us are dissapointed in the new MaxiTouch. The percentage of really useful apps must be small from what I've seen. Most are childish widgets. Is there a survey out there?

Oh dear, the troll has awoken.

There are plenty of useful apps. When you search for something on the internet you have to ignore the first few responses, same with the app store. I have downloaded loads of little apps which from basic network ping tools to activesync troubleshooting tools. When Apple state 'theres an app for that' seems that they aint lying.
post #31 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Dumb survey. Adults have iPhones. Kids have iPods. Adults are more busy than kids. Adults don't have time to play with apps on their iPhones like teens do.

At least not until Apple adds the "explicit" section of iTunes .
post #32 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loup407 View Post

I have to agree, as an iPhone owner, AT&T's lack of functionality does cause you to spend time dealing with dropped calls. I have to say, though, amidst all the of games and fart apps in the App Store, there are plenty of functional and useful apps. I run a brand strategy firm, and can run my business from my iPhone. With access to Basecamp and Highrise, a to-do list with Things, Evernote for random items I don't want to forget, and ability to create a contract with Docs-to-Go, or "fax" a doc with scanner Pro or JotNot...I leave my MBP at home more and more. Of course, I'm sure that many of the posters above have real jobs and can't work on their cancer cure on the iPhone (or write code for another far app). I know many businesspeople that find their iPhone a critical tool (and most of them were Blackberry users).

Hey I'm glad you contributed...I'm going to look into those apps you use! Especially the ability to fax a doc from the iPhone! As a real estate agent sounds pretty cool. Have you tried Dropbox?

And the other one recommended by MacWorld was 1Password used in conjunction with Dropbox....haven't used it yet but they are very impressed with 1Password...anyway thanks again for the recommendations!
post #33 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

Oh dear, the troll has awoken.

There are plenty of useful apps. When you search for something on the internet you have to ignore the first few responses, same with the app store. I have downloaded loads of little apps which from basic network ping tools to activesync troubleshooting tools. When Apple state 'theres an app for that' seems that they aint lying.

What flavor is your kool-aid this morning? I never said they're weren't any useful apps , that's only what you inferred.
post #34 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

The percentage of really useful apps must be small from what I've seen. Most are childish widgets. Is there a survey out there?

It isn't that I don't see why you feel like that.
Yet another interesting fact is third-party apps have by now replaced almost without exception Apple's ones on my iPhone screen of daily useful stuff...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post

Perhaps you can help direct me to a way that I can find the top 100+ best useful apps the App Store offers without the chore of reading each description and misleading name?

By going by the "most sold" all it turns up is games, porn and crap.

thanks

Why not trying googling for the best apps. There are countless sites that list, test and rank apps base on the site's focus.


Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

Oh dear, the troll has awoken.

Someone must have said his name three times.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #36 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

I'll have to try the antimosquito- I get bit all night in summer cause the neighbor has a pond.

Let us know!

I'm originally from Minnesota, and there are two types of mosquitos. Those that are so small and can fold their wings back and squeeze thru the screen of the screen door and those that are big enough to just open the screen door using the door knob!
post #37 of 65
Out of all the Apps for the iPhone/Touch, most are junk. That's what Mac users used to say about PCs.

There are some winners out there, though.
post #38 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Out of all the Apps for the iPhone/Touch, most are junk. That's what Mac users used to say about PCs.

There are some winners out there, though.

I agree with you and like a previous poster said, I usually rely on personal recommendations or MacWorld Magazine, or their Video podcasts. Going thru the iTunes App store is just too time consuming....
post #39 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Why not trying googling for the best apps. There are countless sites that list, test and rank apps base on the site's focus.


I've done that, unfortunately haven't found a user rated site or a non-bias or non-compensated site to be able to just find the best apps.

Perhaps you can recommend such a site?

I would really like to find just the best useful apps the App Store offers, not porn, games, fart apps and the like.

thanks, sorry to be a bother....



Quote:
Someone must have said his name three times.


to bad his need for abuse and those who need to respond, conflict with everyone's else's need to have a meaningful discussion.

there should be a way to separate the two needs somehow
post #40 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post

That's because we're too bust reconnecting all our dropped calls. I must have had 3 last night.

But seriously , we use our iPhones as what they are-mobile phones ,so no comparison. We text, make calls, use email.
Most of Apple's apps are toys anyway. That is another reason many of us are dissapointed in the new MaxiTouch. The percentage of really useful apps must be small from what I've seen. Most are childish widgets. Is there a survey out there?

The usefulness of an app is utterly subjective. Let's say someone puts out a news app for Arsenal Football Club. To an Arsenal fan, that's going to be really interesting. To a Chelsea fan, the app probably has zero value.

In any case, the percentage of "useful" apps is immaterial. You're setting up a weak straw man argument.

No one is forcing any smartphone user to download apps. In a capitalist system, a wide variety of choices is considered to be a positive. If Amazon.com (and its partners) offer a million SKUs, that's not a bad thing.

If you want to fault Apple's iTunes Store for not offering better granular controls in finding the apps you like, that's a reasonable assertion (although you did not make that). If you want to fault Apple's iTunes Store for the sheer variety of apps, your assertion would be laughable.

Now which will it be?
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