or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Mac OS X market share up 29%, Leopard still most common
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mac OS X market share up 29%, Leopard still most common - Page 2

post #41 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by awilensky View Post

I just came from a coffee shop in Beverly MA, and every laptop was an Apple. That's gotta mean something in an age diverse situation.

Which cafe? Atomic or Trevi? I go to both, and I Macs outnumber PCs every time. Even at a big chain like Panera Macs outnumber PCs almost all the time. As more and more high school and college students get Macs, the greater effect it will have on market share. In my graduate program cohort at Endicott College, 11 of the 14 students have Macs, 2 have PCs (both Dells), and one doesn't own a computer, but uses a Mac at her day job to write her papers. I suspect that is true at a lot of colleges.
post #42 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Dawkins View Post

LOL, what a biased fanboy. Did you see what your 1st post?
Windows 7 was released just a few months ago. Already surpassing the sorry Mac marketshare

Can you "give it a few quarters"? I guess: No.

His comment didn't state Mac OS X 10.6 installs would surpass Window 7 in a few months. Frankly I don't know why anyone would compare a licensed OS to an OEM-paired OS unless they have an anti-Apple agenda, which in itself makes no sense.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #43 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Dawkins View Post

LOL, what a biased fanboy. Did you see what your 1st post?
Windows 7 was released just a few months ago. Already surpassing the sorry Mac marketshare

Can you "give it a few quarters"? I guess: No.

I have no idea what you're trying to say here.

In any event, Universal Licensing is what it is. I don't think anyone here was comparing SL to Win 7 sales. Nor would it make much sense to do so. Whatever made you post such a remark?
post #44 of 157
I can think of FORTY BILLION reasons of why the Mac marketshare is not that "sorry".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Dawkins View Post

Already surpassing the sorry Mac marketshare
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #45 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

I suspect that Leopard is still dominant is because there are many Mac users that have not moved to Intel Macs.

You are correct. There are still quite a few pre-Intel Macs around, despite Apple's insistence to the contrary.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #46 of 157
The real story is more complex than vocal Windows users (well, those who aren't complaining) would like to admit. Windows 7's biggest competitor is not OS X. It's Windows XP.

Yes, Microsoft doesn't care because every Win XP sale . . . is a sale, and is $$ in MS' pocket. Well, MS should care. XP was never a very good OS (aesthetics, UI, security, everything), though it was better than what came before. By the time Vista was released it was already an aging dinosaur. By now, it's just a horrible bunch of code. By sometime next year XP will be a decade old. Yuck.

Windows XP constitutes between 60 to 70 percent of the world's computer user base. About two-thirds of XP users do not have hardware new enough to take advantage of Windows 7. Nor is this necessary.

These computers are doing useful functions which wouldn't really benefit by an upgrade. They are old computers running old software which works well enough for occasional business use/running displays/cash registers/light duty use as front ends to mainframes or the web. As such, they are unlikely to be upgraded soon until the hardware breaks. It is not automatic that the owners will buy a new Wintel machine; Apple and Chrome may offer other advantages.

What is most troubling about this story is that 18% of the world's computers were on Vista at Windows 7's release. About half of those had been downgraded to Windows XP. All of those computers should have been upgraded, because Windows Seven offers better security than XP or Vista. But, WIndows Seven's Usage has only moved from 2% to 9% in four months.

This is less than half as fast as Mac users are upgrading to Snow Leopard. Most Mac users tend to upgrade; 93% of Mac Users had upgraded to Leopard in 19 months. Snow Leopard, at current rates, will be at 90% in 12 to 14 months.

This is important because Apple won't move to the 64 bit kernel by default until enough apps have been upgraded to 64 bit code and enough people are already booting into the 64 bit kernel. The main advantage for booting into the 64 bit kernel is enhanced speed, followed by improved security.

The important thing, though, is that the 32 bit Carbon APIs will be rendered legacy, and thus apps in it will be sidelined. The 64 bit Cocoa apps will be much faster and more flexible, so there is little reason for newer machines to use Carbon. The Mac will become fully Object Oriented in five years, when Carbon is gone.

Apple hasn't upgraded all of its own apps to Cocoa yet, but it will before Mac OSX 10.7 is released in 12 to 18 months.
post #47 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I don't believe you.

I've upgraded dozens and dozens of people to Snow Leopard and had zero problems with any of them.

Even Leo Laporte now says he hates it and regrets upgrading to Snow Leopard. So......

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #48 of 157
Who?

I upgraded as soon as I got my $9.99 disk and haven't looked back.

I like it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Even Leo Laporte now says he hates it and regrets upgrading to Snow Leopard. So......
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #49 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Who?

I upgraded as soon as I got my $9.99 disk and haven't looked back.

I like it.

So do most Mac users, apparently. Or else those Apple customer satisfaction numbers are a conspiracy of some kind.
post #50 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

So do most Mac users, apparently. Or else those Apple customer satisfaction numbers are a conspiracy of some kind.

Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #51 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you.

True.
post #52 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.

From my own experience and other people I know, I really recommend everyone to update to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big step forward.
Apple had me at scrolling
Reply
Apple had me at scrolling
Reply
post #53 of 157
Well, I'm still on Leopard, as I used a PowerMac G5. Also, the last PowerMac's were sold not that long ago, so there will still be quite a few people not upgrading to SL until they get a new mac.
Replace user and press any key to continue!
Reply
Replace user and press any key to continue!
Reply
post #54 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The real story is more complex than vocal Windows users (well, those who aren't complaining) would like to admit. Windows 7's biggest competitor is not OS X. It's Windows XP.

Yes, Microsoft doesn't care because every Win XP sale . . . is a sale, and is $$ in MS' pocket. Well, MS should care. XP was never a very good OS (aesthetics, UI, security, everything), though it was better than what came before. By the time Vista was released it was already an aging dinosaur. By now, it's just a horrible bunch of code. By sometime next year XP will be a decade old. Yuck.

Windows XP constitutes between 60 to 70 percent of the world's computer user base. About two-thirds of XP users do not have hardware new enough to take advantage of Windows 7. Nor is this necessary.

These computers are doing useful functions which wouldn't really benefit by an upgrade. They are old computers running old software which works well enough for occasional business use/running displays/cash registers/light duty use as front ends to mainframes or the web. As such, they are unlikely to be upgraded soon until the hardware breaks. It is not automatic that the owners will buy a new Wintel machine; Apple and Chrome may offer other advantages.

What is most troubling about this story is that 18% of the world's computers were on Vista at Windows 7's release. About half of those had been downgraded to Windows XP. All of those computers should have been upgraded, because Windows Seven offers better security than XP or Vista. But, WIndows Seven's Usage has only moved from 2% to 9% in four months.

This is less than half as fast as Mac users are upgrading to Snow Leopard. Most Mac users tend to upgrade; 93% of Mac Users had upgraded to Leopard in 19 months. Snow Leopard, at current rates, will be at 90% in 12 to 14 months.

This is important because Apple won't move to the 64 bit kernel by default until enough apps have been upgraded to 64 bit code and enough people are already booting into the 64 bit kernel. The main advantage for booting into the 64 bit kernel is enhanced speed, followed by improved security.

The important thing, though, is that the 32 bit Carbon APIs will be rendered legacy, and thus apps in it will be sidelined. The 64 bit Cocoa apps will be much faster and more flexible, so there is little reason for newer machines to use Carbon. The Mac will become fully Object Oriented in five years, when Carbon is gone.

Apple hasn't upgraded all of its own apps to Cocoa yet, but it will before Mac OSX 10.7 is released in 12 to 18 months.

WOW, you made everything so clear! Bravo. Now I understand why Microsoft is loosing money.
Apple had me at scrolling
Reply
Apple had me at scrolling
Reply
post #55 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

This is important because Apple won't move to the 64 bit kernel by default until enough apps have been upgraded to 64 bit code and enough people are already booting into the 64 bit kernel. The main advantage for booting into the 64 bit kernel is enhanced speed, followed by improved security. .

Nice post, but one correction. The use of a 32-bit or 64-bit kernel is independent of the app being 32-bit or 64-bit. MS was lazy on this front for their non-server offerings which has somehow imprinted this idea that you need to have a 64-bit OS (read: kernel) to run a 64-bit app.

The only way Apple will move to a 64-bit kernel as default (or the only option) for consumer Macs is if all major drivers and the most common 3rd-party drivers are 64-bit.

While it's still early in the game, my guess is that 10.7 will default to 64-bit for all Macs. Nothing an with a 32-bit CPU (eg: Core Duo) or 32-bit memory addressing (ie: Macs that can only use 3GB RAM) won't be updatable to 10.7... to name a few. You'll be able to boot into 32-bit if needed as this will be a common troubleshooting tip if a peripheral doesn't work. By 10.8 there will be no 32-bit kernel support.

So far, only the improved security is the only advantage for every Mac running in 64-bit over 32-bit. I've seen a few Macs not run as well as 64-bit due to less than stellar 64-bit driver support, often in the GPU.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #56 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

In this little rant of yours what you are failing to understand is for every 5 Mac users there are 90 Windows users. So you cant compare OSX upgrade data to Windows data. Also the fact that Netbooks use Windows XP and are big sellers slants the numbers.

Windows 7 sold more copies in pre orders then SL has sold to date.

Windows 7 has been out for two months and it already has a larger install base then SL and Leopard and Tiger combined.

Lets also point out that with a much smaller install base over 20% of Mac users are still running an OS two generations or older.

1) Win7 has been out for over 4 months, not 2 months.

2) Good job comparing 5 users from a PC OEM to a 90 OS users that cover every other OEM.

3) Of course Win7 sales are larger than SL sales WHICH IS DESIGNED TO RUN ON INTEL MACS. The number of Win7 Public Beta from nearly 14 months ago likely got installed on more machines than on Macs. Note, the nearly 14 months ago comment.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #57 of 157
I upgraded to Snow Leopard because I read that it was to be the foundation for all these great new software programs that would be faster and better. As far as the nuts and bolts are concerned, the only Kernel I'm familiar with is the one with the secret recipe for fried chicken.

And I like to stay current. I figure sooner or later I'm going to want to do something that will require the snowy cat. The price was reasonable too. If it had been $130 I might have passed for now because there were no new features that I felt I needed.

A different story with Leopard. Quick look is a must. I miss it every time I touch a PC. And of course the easy "set it and forget it" time machine. Plus the easier networking with the new finder window.

As far as the problems, I'm confident Apple will release an update that will address any issues. Just as they did with Leopard, Aperture, Mobile Me, etc.

Just a little disappointed that I've had crashes. Glad to hear that it's only me. I bet you guys never have a dropped call or a yellow monitor!
post #58 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Nice post, but one correction. The use of a 32-bit or 64-bit kernel is independent of the app being 32-bit or 64-bit. MS was lazy on this front for their non-server offerings which has somehow imprinted this idea that you need to have a 64-bit OS (read: kernel) to run a 64-bit app.

The only way Apple will move to a 64-bit kernel as default (or the only option) for consumer Macs is if all major drivers and the most common 3rd-party drivers are 64-bit.

Ah, true. I stand corrected. Your point about drivers is a good one. That is, in many ways, just as critical as app-migration to 64-bit.
post #59 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerseymac View Post

I upgraded to Snow Leopard because I read that it was to be the foundation for all these great
A different story with Leopard. Quick look is a must. I miss it every time I touch a PC. And of course the easy "set it and forget it" time machine. Plus the easier networking with the new finder window.
\\

Quicklook is the cornerstone of my daily productivity on a Mac.

Quicklook + Exposé + Spaces. The icon previews (in icon view in the Finder) are a wonderful little touch as well. A minor convenience, but one that I really appreciate from time to time. I have an entire folder of media that I play through icon previews almost exclusively. Love it. In fact, they aren't even previews but full "mini-players." You can watch an entire video like that.

By the way, a little trick:

http://www.macosxhints.com/article.p...90912030240376

Very cool.
post #60 of 157
Why do you guys have to get into these stupid arguments?



Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Windows 7 sold more copies in pre orders then SL has sold to date.

Your own words. "For every 5 Mac users there are 90 Windows users."

Quote:
Windows 7 has been out for two months and it already has a larger install base then SL and Leopard and Tiger combined.

"For every 5 Mac users there are 90 Windows users."

Are you getting it yet? 90 customers tend to buy more than 5 customers.

Quote:
Lets also point out that with a much smaller install base over 20% of Mac users are still running an OS two generations or older.

Even more stupid! What are you even trying to say here? That 80% of Mac users are using either of the two OSs released in the last 2.5 years.... is a bad thing?
post #61 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

I had no problems upgrading, but then my MBP was less than 6 months old when I upgraded. Could be that older MBPs may have had some problems?

No. I have one of those, on it now, and it has been essentially flawless.
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #62 of 157
Snow Leopard didn't run well at all on my unibody MBP with 2GB RAM. I got constant beach balls from simple things like scrolling down a web page (even without Flash) with just a few simple programs open. Eventually it slowed to a crawl even with all programs closed and required a restart. I looked at Apple's forums and found a few very long threads with people experiencing the same issues. Since upgrading to 4GB RAM it's run great though, even with heavy multitasking. So I wouldn't recommend SL with less than 4 gig of memory. Maybe 10.6.3 will be a big step forward performance wise even for users with less RAM, we'll see.
post #63 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonefree View Post

Snow Leopard didn't run well at all on my unibody MBP with 2GB RAM. I got constant beach balls from simple things like scrolling down a web page (even without Flash) with just a few simple programs open.

If that is the case then I'm screwed. My iMac only supports 2 gig. If an update doesn't fix the problem I'll have to downgrade. I already did a clean install and updated Flash. I run iLife and Toast for the most part. I have very few third party apps on my machine. What a shame.

At least everyone else has had a "flawless" experience.
post #64 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Even Leo Laporte now says he hates it and regrets upgrading to Snow Leopard. So......

Who the heck is Leo Laporte, and is there a reason we should care about him/her?
post #65 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

What are you going on about again??

Maybe you should read what you wrote...

You quoted this from the article

Quote:
or Microsoft, Windows XP remains the dominant platform, with 51.8 percent of users running the operating system. In fact, Quantast found that Windows XP actually gained share in January, due to strong sales of netbooks.

Windows Vista commands 37.4 percent of PC users, while Windows 7 has been adopted by 10.2 percent.

Saying this was disturbing, but you didn't think that fact that Leopard was still the highest on the Mac side was an issue. Both will change as time goes on, XP will fall in numbers and Windows 7 will increase, just like your reference to SL, it will also rise in time.
post #66 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

WOW, you made everything so clear! Bravo. Now I understand why Microsoft is loosing money.

Maybe you can help them in tightening up their money??
post #67 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Maybe you should read what you wrote...

You quoted this from the article



Saying this was disturbing, but you didn't think that fact that Leopard was still the highest on the Mac side was an issue. Both will change as time goes on, XP will fall in numbers and Windows 7 will increase, just like your reference to SL, it will also rise in time.

What's disturbing is that XP, one of the lousiest, most insecure, ugliest, unstable operating systems - which was already an aging, absolute dog of an OS three years ago, is *still* on 60-70% of the world's computers, with Vista being so bad that people actually *downgraded* to XP.

THAT is what's disturbing.

Leopard being the highest on the Mac side . . . is just a great, technologically current OS that's still in wide use. No problems there. It isn't a decade-old junk operating system from MS.
post #68 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

I can think of FORTY BILLION reasons of why the Mac marketshare is not that "sorry".


1. sorry that they contributed to a massive cash balance for a company? great if you are shareholder (well not really, cos you dont get a share of that 40)
2. what percentage of that 40 came from mac?
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
post #69 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

What's disturbing is that XP, one of the lousiest, most insecure, ugliest, unstable operating systems - which was already an aging, absolute dog of an OS three years ago, is *still* on 60-70% of the world's computers, with Vista being so bad that people actually *downgraded* to XP.

THAT is what's disturbing.

Leopard being the highest on the Mac side . . . is just a great, technologically current OS that's still in wide use. No problems there. It isn't a decade-old junk operating system from MS.

Hmm, I have a XP based laptop here, I don't have any issues with it, it runs fine, it is secure, it is stable, and it isn't that ugly. I also have a Vista 64 box, it also runs fine, I don't have many issues with it. Maybe it is you having the issues with it.

I also have two Leopard boxes, and two Snow Leopard boxes. And to say that Leopard doesn't have any issues is being a bit stupid, Leopard was terrible at its intial release, as was Tiger, and Snow Leopard, they all required several service packs to get stability back
post #70 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Dawkins View Post

LOL, what a biased fanboy. Did you see what your 1st post?
Windows 7 was released just a few months ago. Already surpassing the sorry Mac marketshare

Can you "give it a few quarters"? I guess: No.

Seriously Ricardo, wouldn't you just be happier posted over at the Windows Supersite than at AppleInsider? Don't you feel the least bit silly spitting and gibbering in these posts? You surely must know that you are not going to change anyone's mind here with mindless arguments (paraphrasing from above) of "hur-hur-hur the cleaned up mess that was Vista is now Windows 7 (cuz Redmond couldn't even maintain the Vista moniker cuz it suxxored) wuz channel-crammed and forced into OEM builds to look good enough to outpace Snow Leopard you tools!"

I am glad Microsoft was able to remedy the issues with Vista and deliver a solid and decently performing version in Windows 7. Lords knows their consumer market needed it badly. It is laughable that you have to keep referring to something that everyone here has openly acknowledged - that Microsoft has the majority marketshare in OS sales. No one here has made any attempt to refute that very obvious and plain fact. That act alone seems to indicate a large amount of insecurity and doesn't help your case at all.
post #71 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

What's disturbing is that XP, one of the lousiest, most insecure, ugliest, unstable operating systems - which was already an aging, absolute dog of an OS three years ago, is *still* on 60-70% of the world's computers, with Vista being so bad that people actually *downgraded* to XP.

THAT is what's disturbing.

That's why they love it..It means job security
post #72 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.



Snow Leopard has been the best update to Mac OS X ever. I've had it since launch trouble free.

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply
post #73 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post



Snow Leopard has been the best update to Mac OS X ever. I've had it since launch trouble free.

Feature wise yes, stability wise, no
post #74 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Feature wise yes, stability wise, no

You gotta be kidding me

Smoothest and most stable update

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply

iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

Reply
post #75 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post

You gotta be kidding me

Smoothest and most stable update

His post makes little sense since it was nearly feature-free. I was impressed with the stability of the SL well into the Betas, which is something I didn't expect.

Apple's Mac growth means that even if a smaller percentage experience issues that the ring of people having problems will be louder. I wonder if there is a formula for that.

I look forward to this year's WWDC where I assume we'll get a preview of the UI changes to come in 10.7. I wonder if a tick-tok method upgrade cycle Ã* la Intel for their OS releases would be feasible. One focusing on foundation changes with the next focusing on UI changes.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #76 of 157
Wow, Windows sure it dominant. It's good to see the Mac still growing though.
post #77 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

His post makes little sense since it was nearly feature-free. I was impressed with the stability of the SL well into the Betas, which is something I didn't expect.

Yes I forgot, you are always right and everyone else is wrong. SL was buggy on release, that is a fact, so was Leopard, I can't say about Tiger because I didn't upgrade until around 10.4.3. If you were impressed by the stability, then all that says is you don't have a high standard level.
post #78 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Thanks.

What about worldwide?

Same here, let's wait for tomorrow's results on NetMarketShare (most interestingly this table), which are global.
post #79 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Wow, Windows sure it dominant. It's good to see the Mac still growing though.

Windows used to be far more dominant. It's in fact experienced its greatest decline in share (along with share value) under Ballmer.
post #80 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Anecdotal: But I was using my macbook yesterday in McDonald's (free wifi-and no I don't eat the food-just coffee!) And a retired gentlemen made a comment to me, that all the 'computers' in here are 4 macs! I held up my iPhone 3Gs and said, '5!' He opened his belt clip and pulled out an iPhone 3G and said, '6!'

Pretty cool!

I had that situation in my local coffee shop. When I opened my Mac book Pro someone shouted out "that's number 12 now". I looked up and all the patrons had Macs of various flavors. We all laughed and it became a great conversation piece.

Mac Pro Dual 2.8 Quad (2nd gen), 14G Ram, Two DVD-RW Drives, OS X 10.9
Mac Book Pro Core 2 Duo 2.16Ghz, SuperDrive, ATI X1600, 2GB RAM, OS X 10.7
1TB Time Capsule

Reply

Mac Pro Dual 2.8 Quad (2nd gen), 14G Ram, Two DVD-RW Drives, OS X 10.9
Mac Book Pro Core 2 Duo 2.16Ghz, SuperDrive, ATI X1600, 2GB RAM, OS X 10.7
1TB Time Capsule

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Mac OS X market share up 29%, Leopard still most common